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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little-Pink-Hen View Post
    Its the only way I've ever spoken to my dd. I don't do baby talk. It's not productive in learning language. If dd has a nick name for something it's her own invention and doesn't get reinforced by us.

    Sorry, I'm not sure if you saw my info above, but Infant Directed Speech (baby talk) is very productive in learning language

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    Responding to babbling to me is different to baby talk. Baby talk is what I described in my previous post. The replacing of proper letters and sounding of words with different letters to make it sound 'cute'. IMO that isn't conducive to good speech.

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    I ask my newborn if she wants a feed and wait for a response.

    I forget I'm not breast feeding a toddler any more.

    I talk to jasper like an adult most of the time. kinda like I would an adult visiting from overseas who speaks but is still learning English. so I speak clearly and provide explanations in simple language when I need to. there's no point talking to him in a way he can't follow.

    also like grocery shopping I ask my babies if we should get chicken or mince or if we need eggs and did daddy want honey or jam while they stare at me and coo.

    I also often repeat back to jasper full sentences - I do it all the time so much so I accidentally do it to df when he doesn't complete a sentence properly.

    like jasper says "mummy sandwich - table"

    "jasper, would you like to eat your sandwich at the table?"

    "yes - juice cup"

    "did you want to have juice in your cup? what kind of juice?/colour cup"

    though I don't correct him all the time - I don't mind if he keeps saying "that's berry scary!" or "my can't like that" or "mummy get up! it's day time! it's not dark time anymore!"



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    Last edited by Boobycino; 05-06-2012 at 23:10.

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    Regina phalange - interesting info... Although i dont understand how responding to infant babble with meaningless babble, is any more useful than responding with proper words... My understanding is that the infant obtaining a response is the important part that reinforces language is bidirectional etc? So babble is no more useful in this case that real words?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regina Phalange View Post
    Sorry, I'm not sure if you saw my info above, but Infant Directed Speech (baby talk) is very productive in learning language
    I meant baby talk long after the child had started gaining verbal language. Eg: dwinkie, sgetti, Milkie, tanas when they are toddlers and preschoolers and can easily pick up the word.
    When I am speaking to my preschoolers that I teach ill say would you like a drink of milk? We are having spaghetti for lunch, would you like sultanas as well?
    If they say they would like tanas or love sgetti I'll reply here are sultanas, I love spaghetti too!

    My fil constantly talks like a baby to dd it annoys me so much when her pronunciation is great already

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regina Phalange View Post
    Sorry, I'm not sure if you saw my info above, but Infant Directed Speech (baby talk) is very productive in learning language
    It's interesting you and I have both study language development in uni yet have different knowledge etc. language development is a passion of mine as well

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Trooper View Post
    Regina phalange - interesting info... Although i dont understand how responding to infant babble with meaningless babble, is any more useful than responding with proper words... My understanding is that the infant obtaining a response is the important part that reinforces language is bidirectional etc? So babble is no more useful in this case that real words?

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    Definitely the bidirectional factor in speech development is reinforced by any turn-taking by mum and bub, so it doesn't matter if you babble or coo or read the financial section of the newspaper, the baby will learn to take turns in conversation as you listen and respond to their vocalisations and make vocalisations of your own.


    Also, if your baby (say, 5 months old) babbles 'ba ba ba ba' to you, and you listen and then babble back to them 'ba ba ba ba, da da da da', they will listen to the new sound 'da' and will start to learn to copy that sound, so that is where babbling with an infant can be helpful, as they will listen and try to copy.

    But there are many different factors in speech development, independent of the bidirectionality of the conversation, that are developed through Infant Directed Speech. Studies consistently show that children respond to and acquire language through the higher pitch, simplified vocabulary, fewer syllables, repetitive speech patterns, repetitive questioning, grammatically simple nature of Infant Directed Speech. So it's not just babbling back to your baby, you modify the speech as the child gets older, and combine it with adult speech as well. (Which is also referred to as Child Directed Speech, I guess suggesting that it isn't just for babies, but toddlers & children as well
    Last edited by Cinderella82; 05-06-2012 at 23:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little-Pink-Hen View Post
    I meant baby talk long after the child had started gaining verbal language. Eg: dwinkie, sgetti, Milkie, tanas when they are toddlers and preschoolers and can easily pick up the word.
    When I am speaking to my preschoolers that I teach ill say would you like a drink of milk? We are having spaghetti for lunch, would you like sultanas as well?
    If they say they would like tanas or love sgetti I'll reply here are sultanas, I love spaghetti too!

    My fil constantly talks like a baby to dd it annoys me so much when her pronunciation is great already
    I see what you're saying! I think the important factor with Infant Directed Speech, the focus is on being a level ABOVE where the child is currently at in their speech and language, not a level below. So, if a preschool child says to you 'I want sultanas', you wouldn't say 'Oh, you want a tana? Yummy tanas!', but you might say that to a 6 month old (although, I would say SULtana at any age But if a 2 year old said to you 'I want sultanas', you would perhaps say something like, 'You would like some sultanas? Sure, I'll get some sultanas while you finish your lunch', or something like that. You wouldn't speak that way to an adult.

    Interesting that you haven't learned about Child Directed Speech at uni! Are you studying Early Childhood? How far into the degree are you? Perhaps it is still to come!

    Boobycino described it well above in her post about repeating her son's sentences back to him, that is using Child Directed Speech, but she is not talking down to him. If she spoke that way to her husband, he might feel like she was talking down to him but it is developing her son's vocabulary, etc. and using speech in a repetitive pattern in a way that is age-appropriate for him.
    Last edited by Cinderella82; 05-06-2012 at 23:24.

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  12. #39
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    My Ds got lucky then lol.
    I have never done the goo goo ga ga baby talk to him and he speaks very well for a 2 year old,

    He refers to himself as I already which I am not sure how or where he learned (I guess from me saying things like oh you farted / I farted / you sneezed / I sneezed / are you okay? Yes i'm okay lol at 2 he will ask people 'you okay?' If they seem sad or sick and tell me I stuck / I fell etc etc)

    I was the same though, at 2 I *should* have been delayed in speech as a result of my hydrocephalus but could speak very well.

    Mum never did baby talk with her children either so I guess thats why I didnt

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    See that i agree with - makes sense to use simple syllable words, in an excited/higher pitch voice, with a baby.. But i would argue as long as they are real words... Ie drink vs dwink.

    I also think it makes sense to talk a level above where the child is at... As lil pink hen made the example with a child using the word sultana, then the adult saying 'tana' or 'tarni warni' or whatever other ridiculous baby talk term you want to throw in there - it is redundant if the child is already a step ahead.

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