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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squishy115 View Post
    Nice one Misscheeky...thank you! As a teacher of young kids, breaking the 'baby talk' habit is hard. By structuring your questions and sentences properly - such as, "would you like a sandwich?" rather than "you want sandwich?" - you are modeling appropriate grammar from a young age. They may not get it until they are much older, they may pick out the key words - "want sandwich" - to start with but they will get there.

    Two thumbs up from me!
    Thank you! This has made my day, feeling like a great Mummy today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benji View Post
    I sometimes find myself treating and speaking to DS in ways that are far above his age and comprehension. It's very unfair, sometimes I forget he's only 6. In terms of the human life, that's still very young. I do have to stop myself sometimes.

    I always get him to remind me of things we need. He has a crazy good memory so he never forgets things while we're at the shops etc wheras I do.
    I dont think that is unfair at all.. I think sheltering and/or lying to a child is far worse!

    Children comprehend much more than we give them credit for - and after all we are raising little adults, not perpetual children

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  4. #23
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    My ds is so ld for his age,he got me to apply for a debit card when he was about 7 ,telling me that credit cards are bad...

    He talks about lots of adult stuff ( nothing inappropriate though )

  5. #24
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    I have always spoken to DD like an adult thing is she always replies!

    She has always had great language skills so I have never seen then need to baby her in ways of communication anyway.

    When we go to the shops I will say okay DD don't let Mummy forget bread! She always reminded me!.. My 2 year old has a better memory then myself

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    That's not crazy at all. I address questions like that to my dog. Now that's crazy.

    Sometimes I then answer the question as her and have a whole conversation with myself. Maybe I'm weirder than I realised. lol

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  8. #26
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    OJandMe is offline I am the strength my children will have.
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    We've always spoken to all the kids properly. my MIL doesn't and it drives me crazy...

    she'll say things like.. "You need Ma to wipe your bottee (bottom)" or "let's get your bot bot (bottle) and say "tatas" (bye)"..... omg... drives me NUTS.

    Because DH and I have always spoken to the boys in regular language they have a very good vocabulary and a pretty amazing ability to verbalise how they are feeling. DH is an extremely good communicator, we're both words and language people, so our house is constantly filled with talking, song and reading.

    We often get comments about how well the boys converse.

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    Absolutely not crazy, I natter away to my DD about everything and anything!
    I do think that Infant Directed Speech (‘baby talk’) is also really important though – I studied Infant Directed Speech at Uni, and it really does aid in the acquisition of language, & is used by many cultures around the world. Babytalk’ does also really have an important role to play in language learning. So, even though it is great to integrate adult speech in your communication with your child, baby talk is also really beneficial.

    I have a link here that sums it up pretty well - sorry, it's just from Wikipedia I don’t have access to any of the studies that I used at Uni… it does give a basic summary, though!)


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_talk

    Here are some quotes from the link:


    "it has been found that six month olds can discriminate between medial position syllables in words with multiple syllables when infant directed speech is used. Therefore, infant directed speech is a powerful tool in providing a base for language acquisition. Infants are able to apply principles of this practice to larger words and sentences as they learn to process language."

    "Research suggests that infant directed speech promotes the processing of word forms and allows infants to remember words when asked to recall them in the future. As words are repeated through infant directed speech, infants begin to create mental representations of each word. As a result, infants who experience infant directed speech are able to recall words more effectively than infants who do not."

    "Shore and other researchers believe that baby talk contributes to mental development, as it helps teach the child the basic function and structure of language.[9] Studies have found that responding to an infant's babble with meaningless babble aids the infant's development; while the babble has no logical meaning, the verbal interaction demonstrates to the child the bidirectional nature of speech, and the importance of verbal feedback. Some experts advise that parents should not talk to infants and young children solely in baby talk, but should integrate some normal adult speech as well."
    Last edited by BH-tech; 07-01-2015 at 11:50.

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  11. #28
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    I have done this with both my kids. I remember a friend saying when my first was really little - "she doesn't understand you, why are you asking her things?". I felt embarrassed at the time, but really it makes sense. And surprise my kids have a great vocab. Personally I'm not a fan of baby talk... would the widdle bubby girl wike a wittle dwink *shudder*.

  12. #29
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    HugsBunny is offline Once upon a time there was a bunny.........
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    I talk to my kids like little adults and have done from the time they were babies.

    I quite often have a more intelligent conversation with my almost 7yo than with most adults.

  13. #30
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    Its the only way I've ever spoken to my dd. I don't do baby talk. It's not productive in learning language. If dd has a nick name for something it's her own invention and doesn't get reinforced by us.


 

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