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  1. #1
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    Default Bringing home a puppy

    We will be bringing a four legged member into our family on Friday, and I am after some advice. I ave never owned a dog before and am quite nervous.

    What do you feed your puppy, and how much/often?

    Also, anyone have tips on house training for me?

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    Talk to the breeder, they are the best ones to give you all those answers

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    Shall be doing that ta. Just thought others may have advice too.

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    Feed what the breeder fed. If it's a terrible brand like Pedigree, Safeway Select brand or Chum, change it, but gradually.

    Dry food I *highly highly* recommend is Black Hawk Holistic. Absolutely the top dry food on the market at the moment, has had no recalls, made in Australia from fresh Australian ingredients and I have not heard a word of complaint about it. My Brogan {wolfhound} was losing some rump fur due to skin oil balance issues. Switched to Black Hawk from Nutro, and the change was amazing even in the first week.

    For wet I will always always recommend raw. It can be made or bought pre-made. It's the top choice for quality and health. Here's Australia's original brand: http://www.barfaustralia.com/
    Google 'barf diet for puppies' for recipes, etc.
    Good canned foods, I can only recommend Nature's Gift. The rest are terrible quality with too much corn filler and byproducts.

    Housetraining. My dogs were all strictly raised from pups because I wanted the safest, best family pets that I could have. They were crated or in a puppy pen with toys and chew treats. Every hour I would put a leash on their collar, say "outside!", walk with them to the back door, and take them outside.
    I upped it by attaching a string of large bells to the doorhandle. Every time we went to the door, I'd ring the bell with my hand or foot, and treat the pup. Every time they touched the bell, even by accident, they'd get a treat, then I'd open the door and we'd go outside.
    My adult dogs all ring the bell when they need to go outside. Very useful; no barking, no clawing, no whining. And no peeing on the floor!

    While outside, keep them on the leash. Take them to the area you want them to eliminate, and watch them carefully. As soon as the pup starts squatting, say "Go toilet!" and treat them {if they'll take it}
    Do that every single time they squat.
    Soon you can say "go toilet!" and they'll squat straight away.

    Why this? Because this command is incredibly useful. No more waiting for sniffing, circling, pawing, deciding. When they're adults, you can march out to a certain area, say "go toilet!" and they will immediately squat and eliminate.
    You can imagine how useful this is on car trips, visiting people, on walks, outside the vet's office, and on holidays.
    Never ever punish the pup for eliminating inside. If it eliminates inside, it's not his fault; you were not fast enough or watchful enough.

    I crate and contain because this stops a number of behaviours. It stops chewing on furniture. It stops peeing/pooing on certain areas. It stops playing with toys that don't belong to it. It teaches calm behaviour in a contained area {excellent for boarding, car trips or vet emergencies}. It stops children annoying the pup. It encourages chewing/playing ONLY with the things in it's area. It stops stealing food off benches.
    The list goes on.

    Here's simple tips on crate training/penning: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cratetraining.htm

    Since you seem unsure, here's my best tips.

    To teach leash training; only feed the pup if he's on leash. No exceptions. Take out the food, keep it out of reach, take out the leash, clip it on, then put the food down.
    After a week or so, hold the end of the leash, say "Time to go!", walk a few steps while holding the food bowl, then set it down. Lengthen the distance walked every few days.
    Soon, when you pick up the leash, the pup will follow eagerly.

    Keep a pocketful of treats at all times so you can reward desirable behaviour.

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    I am also a vet nurse and, without wanting to sound rude, I think it is a big call to say that no breeder knows what is best for your dog. I think that there are a lot of extremely knowledgeable breeders out there with valuable advice.

    You really need to do your own research in terms of diet and what training methods suit you best. It will also depend on the breed of dog you're adopting.

    Have you looked up Ian Dunbar's website www.dogstardaily.com and downloaded his FREE books? They are fantastic! And his methods make sense to me, see if you agree. His "bite inhibition" info is fantastic.

    As far as diet goes, continue feeding your new pup the diet the breeder was feeding, and then, if it doesn't suit you (or him/her) or you do some research and find that you want to change, then do so gradually. Puppies get upset tummies really easily from diet change or overfeeding so everything has to be done slowly.

    Your local vet team will definitely have some great advice for you too.

    I also think that the dogzonline forums are full of some fantastic advice so look them up too

    Good luck! New puppies are great!

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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonc View Post
    Being a veterinary nurse at the RSPCA I would never evvvvvvver recommend talking to breeders about nutrition, or anything really. They may have the best intentions but they have no idea of what is medically, nutritionally or mentally best for your dog.
    Unfortunately everyone thinks they are the best qualified and it is really your veterinary team. They have done a lot of clinical studies and have the appropriate resources available to give the most up to date recommendations instead of outdated bad techniques.
    I have had people tell me their dogs breeders told them to feed their puppy week bix (!!!!!!!!!) and that it IS appropriate to,use choker chains on dogs. Sooooooo not true!!! (There are so many resources available instead)

    If you would like to do some reading I'd suggest starting with the rspcas website and talk to your local vet nurse! We are here to help!

    On a personal level-& to answer your question!!!: when my poochies were little they were fed Hills Science Diet puppy, there is a feeding guide on the side of the pack that you need to abide by, you feed appropriate to body weight, you wouldn't feed a chihuahua the same as a St Bernard!! They were fed 2-3 times a day depending on ow old they were- they are just like babies needing small frequent meals.

    I hope this helps, please feel free to pm me if you have any questions!! Good luck!
    And I would never ever feed Hills'.
    The corn and grain filler content is way too high for what you pay for it.
    Even working formulas like Bonnie are lower in fillers and price.

    Vets as a majority do not know what is best for diet. Their nutrition courses are funded by pet food companies.
    Most vets still recommend dry-only diets for cats, despite overwhelming evidence that is causes renal and kidney failure, tooth decay, obesity and diabetes.

    The breeder, who has raised these pups from birth, as well as other litters before them, and several adults, knows more about your pup than the vet who has never met it before.

    Also, check chains have their place in training, as does any training tool.
    It's not a "choker" it's an auditory marker
    That's why they're made out of metal, because the sound of the loose running chain is what checks the behaviour, not their typical bogan use as a strangulation torture instrument.

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    Quote Originally Posted by supa_star323 View Post
    We will be bringing a four legged member into our family on Friday, and I am after some advice. I ave never owned a dog before and am quite nervous.

    What do you feed your puppy, and how much/often?

    Also, anyone have tips on house training for me?
    I love 'dogz online' for anything dog related- it's a purebred forum, but owners of mutts are welcome too.

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonc View Post
    Sorry but you are misinformed.
    Your theory on CHOKER chains is incorrect. Try putting one just on your forearm- not your neck, and pull on it, then come back and see me.
    I guess our hospital sees more tracheal injuries than others...
    No my knowledge of check chains is not incorrect.

    Try seeing a private, professional trainer and asking how they're used.

    As I stated, their intention is not to choke the dog and leave it thrashing on the end of a leash, being slowly strangled as the owner barks "SIT! SIT! SIT!" at their gasping puppy.
    That is the use that irresponsible, uneducated idiots put them to, which provides no training other that to destroy trust and take several steps backwards in having a well turned out family member.

    The people that have educated themselves on their appropriate and responsible use have no such injuries, the same as Haltis, harnesses, slip collars, muzzles, sensory correction collars, crates, flat collars, and a ton of other behavioural aids.

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    Basic advice for bringing home a new puppy. Patience is key. Reward acceptable behaviour whenever you see it with lots of cuddles, praise and most of all tiny treats. The treats need to be small because if you are giving your puppy gigantic chunks of stuff all the time you will be overfeeding and it will be too distracting for the puppy who then takes ages to eat. Feeding 2 - 3 times a day is best because, like babies, they need to eat small ammounts often. I used to feed my puppy dry in the morning, a small bone or raw chicken neck at lunch and wet at night. Do not feed alcohol, chocolate, avocado, cooked bones, dairy, onion, garlic (onion and garlic are in dispute but can be potential liver toxins) or anything high in sugar, salt or fat.

    Join a dog forum and spend lots of time researching on the net.
    When you bring your pup home. Have a space all its own set up with it's water bowl, food bowl,and a bed or a blanket. It will be nervous so deposit the pup in its little spot then sit down somewhere and leave it be. If it comes to you be calm and quiet and affectionate. Don't force the training till it has settled in after a day or two.

    What type of pup are you getting? Because that may help determine your approach to training.

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    Find a vet you trust, go to puppy preschool and see if youhave a pet cafe nearby. The BARF diet is best, but my dog has dry food too. He has mince and also fish. Lots of meaty bones. He has a vet check every 6 months and is in great health. He is 3, the other dog is nearly 15 and in perfect health and a pleasure to be around.


 

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