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  1. #21
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    I agree with pp's. Start to introduce your daughter to the fact that their are multiple religions. Watch a movie with Jewish people in it. See if you can take a tour of the local mosque. Perhaps your daughter will start asking questions in RE class and come to her own conclusion that it's a load of BS. She would have learnt critical thinking skills and made up her own mind... You're just there to guide her...

  2. #22
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    Yes, some children are more susceptible than others, I agree. But the question I would be asking is why is that so? Is it because they don't feel strong enough to question things? I'm not talking about the little ones, 5 or 6 year olds, but many older children are perfectly capable of forming their own opinions about all sorts of things, religion education at school, included.

    I would want to know why my child doesn't question what they are told. I think it's perfectly normal for them to do this.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    If children were sat down in a class for half and hour each week and taught that Luke Skywalker REALLY was a Jedi who could use the force, and they got stickers that said 'the force is with YOU' to go on their 'worksheets' that said the same thing -- I'm pretty sure you'd have a hard time trying to 'undo' all of that as a parent.
    We shouldn't have to contradict a 'teacher figure'.

    Don't send your kid if you don't believe?? Problem solved??

    ..No.
    There's still a problem...
    That's 20 hours worth of school LEARNING time that those kids who are 'sent out' miss out on.
    While the other kids are being instructed, communicated with, have interaction with a 'teacher' etc....My kids have to sit in a room and busy themselves -- supervision ONLY..no interaction from a teacher 'allowed'!

    Segregating children based on THEIR PARENTS FAITH - for indoctrination purposes is an outdated and unfair practise.
    My son used to bring home RE sheets that he had added his own tweaks to - light sabers, jedis fighting etc. I don't think he was very popular in class.

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  5. #24
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    I agree, comparative religious studies are fine, they can even to help promote tolerance of other cultures and belief systems in communities, but in a society that likes to promote its public education system as secular, this form of covert religious indoctrination is unacceptable.

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    Busy-Bee  (01-06-2012),FiveInTheBed  (01-06-2012),SassyMummy  (01-06-2012),WorkingClassMum  (01-06-2012),~ElectricPink~  (02-07-2012)

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Refresh View Post
    Why don't you start looking at some of those other religions with her?
    Mostly due to not having the time right at this point. I ticked RE because i figured it would be best for the professionals to do that way they could answer all her questions as i know nothing and really dont understand most of it.

    CMF - shed be upset because if i removed her from it id be taking away something she seems to be enjoying and the fact that all her friends get to go would upset her

  8. #26
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    It sounds like my daughter is much like Ana's... she will question things, but she knows she goes to school to learn and thus doesn't question what she's taught there. Her teachers "knows all," in her opinion. After all, why would a teacher teach if they didn't know everything?

    Perhaps if she was preached to elsewhere, she would question it... but she knows she's at school to learn and would probably view a religious lesson much the same as she views a maths lesson - as fact.

    I'm also not exactly simply "not religious," I actually think religious indoctrination can be quite harmful and damaging so I actually want it kept well away from her. I talk to her about religion - we were talking about Hindu gods the other day and the idea of reincarnation (while I was driving... lol... bit of a difficult convo to have...), so it's not like we never discuss religion or religious matters... I just don't trust her ability to critically think yet. She's almost 7. She's very black and white in her thinking, and I truly believe religious education would be harmful to her.

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbygirl View Post
    Mostly due to not having the time right at this point. I ticked RE because i figured it would be best for the professionals to do that way they could answer all her questions as i know nothing and really dont understand most of it.

    CMF - shed be upset because if i removed her from it id be taking away something she seems to be enjoying and the fact that all her friends get to go would upset her
    Fair enough! Maybe just introduce it in a chat on the way home from school? Like "did you do religion today? What did you learn? Ooooh that's interesting, did you know that some people believe xyz? Isn't that cool, that some people believe *scripture stuff* and some people believe xyz! There's allll different things to believe in, maybe one day when we're at the library/at home on the computer we can look up some of them and see how different they all are!"

    I understand it's upsetting and confronting. I must admit I was very confronted when my DD told me so bluntly "God made the world in 6 days", I didn't realise it would be drummed into them as truth like that. I went to Catholic schools from K-10 and I was never forced to believe in Creation, so kinda didn't expect it from a public school of all places!

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarabelle View Post
    Yes, some children are more susceptible than others, I agree. But the question I would be asking is why is that so? Is it because they don't feel strong enough to question things? I'm not talking about the little ones, 5 or 6 year olds, but many older children are perfectly capable of forming their own opinions about all sorts of things, religion education at school, included.

    I would want to know why my child doesn't question what they are told. I think it's perfectly normal for them to do this.
    Well i think for in my case with my 6 year old is that my parenting stuff is parenting with facts.

    What i mean is everything i have taught her my self is either the law or a complete fact (except santa, easter bunny & toothfairy)
    Like - you must be a good person to others
    -you must go to school
    -you must wear your seat belt
    -2 + 2 = 4.

    Things like sexuality - iv told her facts - girls do kiss boys & girls do kiss girls
    -clothes - this is a skirt, shirt, shorts, dress, you can wear any of them
    - this is blue, this is pink , you can have both
    Skin comes in a ton of different colours
    Iv given her the facts and told her it is all ok and she can have/be both and never told her that she had to choose or that there is a wrong or right one, it is just what it is.

    So she has never been in a situation where she had to decide which she felt was the right belief.

    So to her some one in a teaching/authority position is always going to tell her the facts .

    Does that make sense?? Im not sure if thats come out right but hopefully you get the jist of it.

    The beliefs in my house are be a good person, use manners and respect.
    We stay away from topics like religion, indepth of peoples race because we simply dont know the facts and dont want to mislead dd in anyway.

    We dont believe at all in religion and some things really pi$$ us off but we dont talk about it period, shes to young to understand our reasons why we dont like it, hence why i figured RE was going to be the best way to give her the facts on each different religion without accidentally misleading or swaying her in a certain direction

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SassyMummy View Post
    It sounds like my daughter is much like Ana's... she will question things, but she knows she goes to school to learn and thus doesn't question what she's taught there. Her teachers "knows all," in her opinion. After all, why would a teacher teach if they didn't know everything?

    Perhaps if she was preached to elsewhere, she would question it... but she knows she's at school to learn and would probably view a religious lesson much the same as she views a maths lesson - as fact.
    her.
    This excatly. This is Basically what i was trying to say. Youve said it better!! Haha

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    I understand it's upsetting and confronting. I must admit I was very confronted when my DD told me so bluntly "God made the world in 6 days", I didn't realise it would be drummed into them as truth like that. I went to Catholic schools from K-10 and I was never forced to believe in Creation, so kinda didn't expect it from a public school of all places!
    Yeah excatly. It was like no religion and then BAM "god dod this god that"
    It was unexpected and shocked me.

    And then it was a feeling of being way out of my depth and had gone on a bit to long for me to step in and say um well some people think xyz

    And now its like she loves it, and she thinks her RE teacher is amazing, i feel like its beyond anything i can could actually pipe in on. I suppose its a scary area for me - not knowing facts and then i dont want to disappoint her ir make her feel different towards the teacher.

    I dont know i just feel out of my depth and feel a professional could handle it better than me. Maybe im making it more a big deal than it is, i dont know, i just know that this is how im feeling and i dont want to upset my dd, i cant bare to see her upset .

    Being in this unknown territory is scary and unknown.


 

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