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  1. #21
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    Ulysses is offline In the eyes of a child you will see...the world as it should be.
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    According to the CDC

    In the U.S., up to 20 percent of persons with measles are hospitalized. Seventeen percent of measles cases have had one or more complications, such as ear infections, pneumonia, or diarrhea. Pneumonia is present in about six percent of cases and accounts for most of the measles deaths. Although less common, some persons with measles develop encephalitis (swelling of the lining of the brain), resulting in brain damage.
    As many as three of every 1,000 persons with measles will die in the U.S. In the developing world, the rate is much higher, with death occurring in about one of every 100 persons with measles.
    Measles is one of the most infectious diseases in the world and is frequently imported into the U.S. In the period 1997-2000, most cases were associated with international visitors or U.S. residents who were exposed to the measles virus while traveling abroad. More than 90 percent of people who are not immune will get measles if they are exposed to the virus.
    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nearly 900,000 measles-related deaths occurred among persons in developing countries in 1999. In populations that are not immune to measles, measles spreads rapidly. If vaccinations were stopped, each year about 2.7 million measles deaths worldwide could be expected.
    In the U.S., widespread use of measles vaccine has led to a greater than 99 percent reduction in measles compared with the pre-vaccine era. If we stopped immunization, measles would increase to pre-vaccine levels.
    Sounds a little bit more than just a disease we let our kids get to raise their immunity? It can be a very serious disease if left to thrive. Better safe than sorry and do what we can to prevent it.
    Last edited by Ulysses; 31-05-2012 at 10:38.

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  3. #22
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    Ulysses is offline In the eyes of a child you will see...the world as it should be.
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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Whilst those figures may be correct for America I don't think they are accurate for Australia. Between 1966 and 1975 (ie prior to vaccination of 12 month olds) There were only 146 deaths recorded.
    I am unsure of your point missie-mack? The USA is a good example of what can happen in a developed society, the results of a disease left to it's own devices would be the same in many westernised cultures. 146 deaths (although you have not provided a reference of where you got this figure from) of infants less than 12 months old in less than 10 years is alot - let me see that is approximately 16 deaths per year. That figure does not include the incidence of death of children above 12 months, pneumonia, ear infections or brain damage - those figures you quote (which a reference would be good for validity) are only in relation to death. Death is not the only negative outcome of a disease.

    The Australian Govt. published these figures in their immunisation handbook
    between one in 1000 and onein 5000cases ofwild-type measles result in severe acute encephalitis with a 10% mortality and considerable morbidity.
    and these figures from the ABS

    There were a total of 45 registered deaths from measles between 1982 and 1992, with 9 of these being children aged 0-6 years
    18 deaths due to measles and 6 due to whooping cough in the period 1988-92
    Which makes it more deadly than whooping cough by 3 fold.
    Last edited by Ulysses; 31-05-2012 at 11:11.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    I've yet to hear of anyone getting brain damage from a common cold.
    Brain damage? No. But lung disease? Yes, very common. Especially in the aboriginal communities. When colds develop into lung infections, it is critical that it be adequately treated with antibiotics. We are seeing now, adults in their 30s and 40s dying of lung disease because they never received proper health care for respiratory infections when they were younger.

    Brooke88 >
    It is always hard not to worry when your kids are sick. I'm glad they are ok. But like lulu2 said, at least they were immunised so it was lessened. My 7 month old son has just recovered from whooping cough, so after almost a month of sleepless nights up with him, yeah i know sick kids really pulls at your heart strings.

    It is an article written purely to scare parents into vaccinating. But unfortunately, the constant bombardment of these fear-feeding articles make the immunising parents unnecessarily terrified too.
    Last edited by steel magnolia; 31-05-2012 at 11:13.

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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Whilst those figures may be correct for America I don't think they are accurate for Australia. Between 1966 and 1975 (ie prior to vaccination of 12 month olds) There were only 146 deaths recorded.
    Only? 146 too many I would say

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  9. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Talk about jumping to conclusions. My point was simple. Your stats were inaccurate and based on a community that lives in an entirely different hemisphere with a different health system. ETA And whilst going off on your own tangent- there was 146 deaths. Period. No age restrictions. That includes the elderly at a time when everyone had measles.
    my statistics were not inaccurate unless you have a problem with numbers from the CDC whom the entire world uses for statistical data. The incidence is not important however the results of the disease are i.e. the number of people who suffer adversely versus the number of people who are infected - its mathematics, and it is in a country with a similar health profile, so i totaly disagree with you there, and so does the australian govt. because alot of their data and recommendations is based on incidence of disease in other countries. The last outbreak in Australia was known to have come from a group of unimmunised persons from overseas - see the Australian immunisation handbook - so it is alot more relevant than you think.

    Again, I would like to see a reference for you numbers. I notice it is missing, for the sake of validity it would be good to see it if you dont mind
    Last edited by Ulysses; 31-05-2012 at 11:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bin13 View Post
    Only? 146 too many I would say
    I agree

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustShiney View Post
    Brain damage? No. But lung disease? Yes, very common. Especially in the aboriginal communities. When colds develop into lung infections, it is critical that it be adequately treated with antibiotics. We are seeing now, adults in their 30s and 40s dying of lung disease because they never received proper health care for respiratory infections when they were younger.

    Brooke88 >
    It is always hard not to worry when your kids are sick. I'm glad they are ok. But like lulu2 said, at least they were immunised so it was lessened. My 7 month old son has just recovered from whooping cough, so after almost a month of sleepless nights up with him, yeah i know sick kids really pulls at your heart strings.

    It is an article written purely to scare parents into vaccinating. But unfortunately, the constant bombardment of these fear-feeding articles make the immunising parents unnecessarily terrified too.
    If you could vax for lung disease, and prevent the majority of this illness, of premature death, that would be great, right? That's why people vax for measles. I don't think the article was written to scare- just to inform.

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  15. #28
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    shame we don't have a vaccine for the common cold, but thank goodness we have one for measles

    Maybe one day they can fix that though.

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  17. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Talk about jumping to conclusions. My point was simple. Your stats were inaccurate and based on a community that lives in an entirely different hemisphere with a different health system. ETA And whilst going off on your own tangent- there was 146 deaths. Period. No age restrictions. That includes the elderly at a time when everyone had measles.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ulysses View Post
    my statistics were not inaccurate unless you have a problem with numbers from the CDC whom the entire world uses for statistical data. The incidence is not important however the results of the disease are i.e. the number of people who suffer adversely versus the number of people who are infected - its mathematics, and it is in a country with a similar health profile, so i totaly disagree with you there, and so does the australian govt. because alot of their data and recommendations is based on incidence of disease in other countries. The last outbreak in Australia was known to have come from a group of unimmunised persons from overseas - see the Australian immunisation handbook - so it is alot more relevant than you think.

    Again, I would like to see a reference for you numbers. I notice it is missing, for the sake of validity it would be good to see it if you dont mind
    missiemack- I'd be interested to see a reference for these numbers too?

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    can speak for missiemack - but i did find those figures she quoted on the who website:
    http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/87/1/07-046375.pdf


 

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