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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post
    N
    I don't believe that people nowdays have the same respect for the elderly and dying, and if you can't wash your own butt then somebody should. Whether they be family or paid carers (whether you can afford it or not), we do it for babies why can't we do it for the dying?

    Yes there is sometimes and perhaps often pain and suffering in death, my beliefs are religious and spiritual in this regard (perhaps not the place to debate them here!) but there should be better care for the dying, whether it be pharmeacutical, with housing/homes/hospitals, pastoral care, more care and love by the families, better food etc - to assist those dying and make the transition more comfortable.
    No one is advocating that once someone reaches a point of not being able to wash themselves they are put to sleep to make things easier for family. If an individual feels the desire to not want to live once they get to that stage, then I believe they should have every right to check out.

    I also agree there should be better care for the dying - those that choose to keep living. But IMO no one has the right to effectively force others to keep living painful, unhappy lives bc they themselves wouldn't opt for euthanasia

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    OK - perhaps 'trendy' to me is more of a satistical sense, rather than fashion, I accept that was probably not the best word.

    But I stand by the rest, I don't believe another has the right to take your life. Period. I too have seen a few very close family members die of long term illnesses which has made me stand by my belief more. We should take more care and love for the dying.

  3. #83
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    SpecialPatrolGroup is offline T-rex is cranky until she gets her coffee.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post
    OK - perhaps 'trendy' to me is more of a satistical sense, rather than fashion, I accept that was probably not the best word.

    But I stand by the rest, I don't believe another has the right to take your life. Period. I too have seen a few very close family members die of long term illnesses which has made me stand by my belief more. We should take more care and love for the dying.
    We do need to take better care of the people are dying and remember that dying is a part of life but if someone could have given my grandmother peace, we would have been so grateful. She would lie in her bed and ask "why is he punishing me?". If prolonging that is loving and caring, I clearly don't know what love is.

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    Benji  (27-05-2012),katezane  (27-05-2012)

  5. #84
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    All for it. Seeing someone die of muscular dystrophy was horrible, especially when it comes the the part where your muscles won't let you breathe and you end up suffocating to death. In the 21st century it seems cruel to me that these people suffer when they needent have or want to.

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    100% for! Why should people have to go through those last painful months/ weeks? Let them choose to go peacefully and with dignity!

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    I think firstly to make a decision people need to know about the process of dying. Even in its final stages a person can be unresponsive and had no food or fluids for almost two weeks before they pass. I don't want to go onto details as it can be traumatic and unfair to those who have seen it first hand to relive those experiences, but the final stages are unfair and undignified and heartbreaking to watch family members wanting to be there to provide comfort in the end but the end dragging on for upwards of a week.
    I think where euthanasia comes into the equation is where you are shortening this process, where death is impending and imminent, not up and about one moment and in a coffin the next...

  9. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post
    Totally against.

    When does your 'right to die' become a pressure to die? You might just be going along with what others think to go with the flow, or have no medical insurance and not want to be a perceived 'burden' on your family? Or worse an insurance policy that you think could help them once you've passed on?

    We should have much better paliative care available, and to the PP no sorry I don't believe that the government keep us alive to get the revenue, it costs so much to keep people in hospitals and nursing homes.

    I have had the situation where my mother was very sick and people said she was better off dead. A month later she was hosting a lunch in the back yard for her girlfriends. Sure with help, but she was totally there. When she died, it was surrounded by the best medical help, her husband and daughters and when she believed her God had called her.

    I don't believe that someone has the right to say the time has come for another person, ever. I believe that death may be slow and sometimes painful, but that is for a reason. What is it? I can only guess and I have a few inklings, but I guess I'll know when I get there.

    I realise this is going against the majority and I'm a bit surprised at the responses to be honest, but I love a healthy debate and if you disagree go right ahead - I don't see it as 'bubhub bullying' but a right to your beliefs.

    Peace out!
    I just spent 6 months nursing my MIL through the end of her journey with terminal cancer. The things she endured to prolong the inevitable were horrific, and her last 2 days were spent in a drug induced coma, to combat the pain she felt.
    I would not wish for any living thing to go through that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Against. If a person is unable to end their own life...I just believe the opportunity for error is just too great (eg a relative interested in $$ conning an elderly cancer Patient to end their life).
    can you expand a little please?

    personally I imagine if the individual cannot physically administer the final drug themselves - the responsibility would be handed to a medical professional who had witnessed signed (by the patient) paperwork, and who would have to consult peers, be double checked etc.

    ...not a relative.

  11. #89
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    I'm for euthanasia.

    My nanna has got a slow progressing dementia and it's cruel what she's going through. She's bedridden, can barely talk and is so thin you can see the shape of her bones.
    I'm in tears everytime I see her.
    She always said she didn't want to get like that. I believe that she should have been able to consent to end it when she was of a sound mind so she wouldn't suffer.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using BubHub

  12. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialPatrolGroup View Post
    We do need to take better care of the people are dying and remember that dying is a part of life but if someone could have given my grandmother peace, we would have been so grateful. She would lie in her bed and ask "why is he punishing me?". If prolonging that is loving and caring, I clearly don't know what love is.
    I dont' see our (as humans) role as prolonging - nor as shortening. I am certainly not stating that your grandmother being allowed to die without euthenasia as being that you don't love her, I'd be horrified that my beliefs were being taken that way.

    I'm talking about Paliative Care being improved across society, and perhaps if it was then people wouldn't be so scared of dying, conditions for the dying improve and people generally wouldn't be so removed from taking care of their dying relatives.

    Here's a broad definition from WHO (and certainly one for debate in itself!):


    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:
    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.
    I Trust this helps explain my position more.

    xx


 

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