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  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post
    Totally against.

    When does your 'right to die' become a pressure to die? You might just be going along with what others think to go with the flow, or have no medical insurance and not want to be a perceived 'burden' on your family? Or worse an insurance policy that you think could help them once you've passed on?
    I do agree this is a very big downfall, but the problem is to avoid this risk, so many people are being tortured by denying the right to die when they would choose.

    It is a very tricky situation, but people need to have the right to choose for themselves.

    However, it needs to be their choice, not someone elses. I pointed that out with my quandry above when I was being asked to choose on behalf of my mother. I know that I would not have wanted to live that way, but did not feel I had the right to choose for her when I didn't know her wishes.

  2. #72
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    Ive spent seven years working in homes for the aged and disabled as a nurse and nurse manager and after seven years holding hands of dying people and supporting their families i never came across a person or family who didn't state that the end wAs cruel and there should be a better way to go... One of my last shifts before maternity leave was nursing an elderly italian while she passed and her entire family was there i wont go into detail but it was the most horrific end I've ever known so much so I've not and will not return to aged care, and that wS three years ago....
    Yes it needs to be well regulated and requires a lot of consideration and preparation, but the option should be avaliable...

  3. #73
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    "I've watched many loved ones suffer through cancer and all of who sadly passed. They could not wash themselves, go to the toilet and had no sense of who was who. You could tell the immense amount of pain they were in.
    Why do you think there is a reason for suffering? "


    No problem, I'm not taking it as you having a go.

    I think that if it becomes 'the norm' or legal or even 'trendy' then people would feel that they become a liability to their family/partners or friends. It could be financially, emotionally, physically, arranging an appropriate home to look after them etc, that they would be pressured to say 'well if I get too bad/hard/expensive, just end it'.

    I don't believe that people nowdays have the same respect for the elderly and dying, and if you can't wash your own butt then somebody should. Whether they be family or paid carers (whether you can afford it or not), we do it for babies why can't we do it for the dying?

    Yes there is sometimes and perhaps often pain and suffering in death, my beliefs are religious and spiritual in this regard (perhaps not the place to debate them here!) but there should be better care for the dying, whether it be pharmeacutical, with housing/homes/hospitals, pastoral care, more care and love by the families, better food etc - to assist those dying and make the transition more comfortable.

    This means government and private care facilities, but mostly a mindset by the general population that people dying aren't going to hurt you and you (mostly) can't catch it, and they aren't going to break if you give them a hug.

    We just aren't putting as much effort into looking after the dying who really need it, I guess is what I mean.

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  5. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialPatrolGroup View Post
    I think that it is much more clear cut when you consider only the wishes of the person who is suffering, but it is also impotant to remember that it is a huge burden to shoulder for the people who are assisting the person to end their life. When a persons bodily autonomy implicates another person there has to be a shared responsibility for it, and very clear guidelines. Ideally we would need to implement an tribunal or something of the like where willing doctors, ethicists and judges would participate on a rotating roster (I don't believe that anyone could bear to preside over these decisions day in day out).
    This!!!!! Also, I believe if the capability is there, there should be a bedside hearing to confirm that this is still their wish. If a legal document was implemented then how often would it need to be reviewed to ensure its validity? I am pro euthanasia.. Through and through. But I just had a horrible thought and something for you all to think about. Hypothetically, it was legal.. Someone had consented to end their life when the time came.. And they were unable to speak. What a horrible thing if they became scared or had one last thing to say or do and changed their mind? Makes me shudder a little.

  6. #75
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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    For. Completely for. I am so ashamed that our country has such backwards policies.

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  8. #76
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    for euthanasia.

    having seen my mother die a long, painful death from cancer (basically starving) and then my grandmother who wanted to die, but her body kept going....

    i think it definitely requires a lot of legal documentation such as wills, witnesses, final decision by the person etc.

    i can only hope that if i am ever in that situation, i am of able body to do the job myself and not put my loved ones through any extra pain.

  9. #77
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    I can't forsee it becoming "trendy".

    I imagine there would be strict control, many steps to take...plenty of counselling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulahoop View Post
    [I]
    I don't believe that people nowdays have the same respect for the elderly and dying, and if you can't wash your own butt then somebody should. Whether they be family or paid carers (whether you can afford it or not), we do it for babies why can't we do it for the dying?

    Yes there is sometimes and perhaps often pain and suffering in death, my beliefs are religious and spiritual in this regard (perhaps not the place to debate them here!) but there should be better care for the dying, whether it be pharmeacutical, with housing/homes/hospitals, pastoral care, more care and love by the families, better food etc - to assist those dying and make the transition more comfortable.

    This means government and private care facilities, but mostly a mindset by the general population that people dying aren't going to hurt you and you (mostly) can't catch it, and they aren't going to break if you give them a hug.

    We just aren't putting as much effort into looking after the dying who really need it, I guess is what I mean.
    The majority of people I've nursed just want to die at home in their own beds not be dumped in facility where you go to die. I cant actually recall anyone terminal showing any interest in food much actually either, if the disease doesn't leave you nauseated the treatment usually will, thats if you have the physical ability to swallow and digest without choking as the swallow and gag reflex is often the first to go hence most people die of malnutrition and dehydration.
    You'll notice most who agree have witnessed a cruel end, its often that that causes more pain than the loved one passing...

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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    I can't forsee it becoming "trendy".
    I agree. In fact, I find the implication offensive. Trendy to not want people to spend their last days in horrific pain and discomfort?

    When I think of euthanasia, I don't think of people who 'could' possibly be cured, I think of those (and there are a lot out there) who are not being cured because they are not curable. If cancer has spread to the blood, bones, then brain and the doctors will not cure the patient because he or she is just too far gone, this person is NOT going to magically get better. It's just not going to happen. Prolonging the inevitible and watching them suffer because WE don't "believe" in euthanasia is cruel. People are doped up on morphiene, starved....but we won't let them go with peace and dignity

    I agree with lambjam, I'm ashamed to live in a country that allows people to suffer the unimaginable.

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    Against. If a person is unable to end their own life...I just believe the opportunity for error is just too great (eg a relative interested in $$ conning an elderly cancer Patient to end their life).

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