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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by trishalishous View Post
    I just spent 6 months nursing my MIL through the end of her journey with terminal cancer. The things she endured to prolong the inevitable were horrific, and her last 2 days were spent in a drug induced coma, to combat the pain she felt.
    I would not wish for any living thing to go through that.
    My condolances trishalishous.
    I know it's bloody hard and there are no winners.
    I respect your beliefs.
    x

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCT View Post
    100% for! Why should people have to go through those last painful months/ weeks? Let them choose to go peacefully and with dignity!
    Exactly this

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    I think the discussion of quality palliative care is a separate issue to euthanasia. For those that don't want to end their lives, they should be treated with dignity, made comfortable and be given the best quality of life that can be administered.

    But some don't want palliative care. For those people it's my opinion they should have a right to choose.

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    AppleIsleSMum  (28-05-2012),Benji  (28-05-2012),FiveInTheBed  (27-05-2012),jennibear  (28-05-2012),Rutabaga  (29-05-2012),SpecialPatrolGroup  (28-05-2012),sweetseven  (27-05-2012),trishalishous  (28-05-2012),Witwicky  (28-05-2012),wrena  (28-05-2012)

  5. #94
    heeeeerekittykitty's Avatar
    heeeeerekittykitty is offline My babies, my cats ....ahhhh , bliss !!!
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    Absolutely for . My reasons could go forever as to why so I'll just say for .

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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    can you expand a little please?

    personally I imagine if the individual cannot physically administer the final drug themselves - the responsibility would be handed to a medical professional who had witnessed signed (by the patient) paperwork, and who would have to consult peers, be double checked etc.

    ...not a relative.
    I think in some cases the Ill person may 'choose' to end their life when they really don't want to. For example, they may be depressed and think their family is better off without them. Or a relative who cares more about inheritance they will get may talk someone into euthanasia (eg providing lots of information on it, swaying the persons mind. Or simply by going on and on about how hard it will be to watch the person suffer, they would end it if they had the choice etc). I know folks would try and put safeguards in place such as counselling, assessments to determine a persons state of mind etc. I just think these would be easily fooled.

  7. #96
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    Laws re euthanasia in The Ntherlands....


    Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide (Review Procedures) Act took effect on April 1, 2002. It legalizes euthanasia and physician assisted suicide in very specific cases, under very specific circumstances.[3] The law was proposed by Els Borst, the D66 minister of Health. The procedures codified in the law had been a convention of the Dutch medical community for over twenty years.

    The law allows medical review board to suspend prosecution of doctors who performed euthanasia when each of the following conditions is fulfilled:
    the patient's suffering is unbearable with no prospect of improvement
    the patient's request for euthanasia must be voluntary and persist over time (the request cannot be granted when under the influence of others, psychological illness or drugs)
    the patient must be fully aware of his/her condition, prospects and options
    there must be consultation with at least one other independent doctor who needs to confirm the conditions mentioned above
    the death must be carried out in a medically appropriate fashion by the doctor or patient, in which case the doctor must be present
    the patient is at least 12 years old (patients between 12 and 16 years of age require the consent of their parents)

    The doctor must also report the cause of death to the municipal coroner in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Burial and Cremation Act. A regional review committee assesses whether a case of termination of life on request or assisted suicide complies with the due care criteria. Depending on its findings, the case will either be closed or, if the conditions are not met brought to the attention of the Public Prosecutor. Finally, the legislation offers an explicit recognition of the validity of a written declaration of will of the patient regarding euthanasia (a "euthanasia directive"). Such declarations can be used when a patient is in a coma or otherwise unable to state if they wish to be euthanized.

    Euthanasia remains a criminal offense in cases not meeting the law's specific conditions, with the exception of several situations that are not subject to the restrictions of the law at all, because they are considered normal medical practice:
    stopping or not starting a medically useless (futile) treatment
    stopping or not starting a treatment at the patient's request
    speeding up death as a side-effect of treatment necessary for alleviating serious suffering

    Euthanasia of children under the age of 12 remains technically illegal; however, Dr. Eduard Verhagen has documented several cases and, together with colleagues and prosecutors, has developed a protocol to be followed in those cases. Prosecutors will refrain from pressing charges if this Groningen Protocol is followed.

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  9. #97
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    SpecialPatrolGroup is offline T-rex is cranky until she gets her coffee.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    personally I imagine if the individual cannot physically administer the final drug themselves - the responsibility would be handed to a medical professional who had witnessed signed (by the patient) paperwork, and who would have to consult peers, be double checked etc.

    ...not a relative.
    Precisely. The benefits of legalising euthanasia is that it brings it out of the shadows, places it in the hands of people who can lend their medical expertise, legal expertise and even pastoral care, rather than a family member having to procure a drug, or any of the other apparatus that people have come up with so facilitate the death of a loved one. Making it legal, without fear of prosecution for the person/s who assist is the truly dignified way to go about this.

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  11. #98
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    For
    My sons grandfather was diagnosed with colon cancer y years ago, surgery and a bag and chemotherapy / radiation sent it into remission, 2.5 years later I met ds's grandfather and he was doing another round of chemotherapy, again the cancer went into remission.

    Ds's grandfather has spent most of the last 12 months in and out of hospital, he got septicemia in december and surprisingly pulled through but the doctors discovered he had a cancer in his brain, it was operable if he got well enough to do it

    In april he got another infection and was hospitalized again, we went down and he looked good,

    The doctors had decided nothing more could be done medically, palative care in his home was all that was available as the cancer had spread too two locations ib the brain and to his lungs.


    We came home friday morning and he passed away on the saturday.

    He didn't really get to say a proper goodbye.

    Once someone has reached the point where a doctor says we can do no more why shouldn't the person be able to choose to end their pain gracefully
    Sent from my MB526 using BubHub

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    For.
    Kind of weird, but when we went to visit my grandma (advanced dementia and renal failure), my dad took me aside and said 'if I ever get like that, please kill me'. I was 12! Scared the crap out of me, but I understood. I would never want to live like she did.
    For me, it's threefold.
    1) I would not want to suffer for months/years with no chance of survival and no enjoyment.
    2) if I was terminal, I would want the chance to have a proper goodbye, with a definite time and place.
    3) Possibly the silliest (for me) part of it : pride. I do not want to spend my last years being washed, fed, toileted. That is my personal idea of hell.

    Just my opinion, please don't take offence to it

  13. #100
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    I think a line needs to be made between withdrawal of treatment and euthanasia.

    Taking someone off (eg) ventilator support, life saving medications, chemo, etc etc is withdrawal of care and not euthanasia.

    Euthanasia is actually giving someone something that will end their life, be it tablet form, injections etc.


 

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