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    Quote Originally Posted by Mummato4 View Post
    Confront the mother and explain that the other children are uncomfortable and perhaps if she's not willing to keep her child behavior in check she would be better off not coming !
    I think I would burst into tears if someone said that to me! And I'd be inclined to say that its a playgroup where many children of different temperaments, brought up in different ways go to socialize and learn life skills by playing and interacting with each other, and maybe its you who should stop going if you're too concerned. The mum is probably doing her best and if she is aware and acknowledging what her child is doing then there's not much else.

    OP - Different kids respond differently to discipline, as I am sure you are aware. My son doesn't look concerned when I look him in the eye and speak very firmly, he yells in my face and hits me and keeps doing whatever he was doing. Its very difficult having a defiant child who doesn't respond like other kids to discipline, and I think the mother is likely to be offended if you approach her and suggest different ways of discipline. I don't think there is much you can do, particularly because you said she DOES try to deal with the behaviour. If she sat back and was too busy chatting to know what her child was like then I would agree that some gentle way of broaching it with her would be ok.


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    It's been my experience that these sorts of kids are the way they are due to lack of discipline. If it hurts her feelings than that her problem she needs to be told to teach her child how to behave appropriately not be allowed to let her kid be a bully !! It's no different if your child is a bully at school, the school calls and it's up to the parents to check their behaviour. Better she learns now than when he is an out of control teenager !

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mummato4 View Post
    It's been my experience that these sorts of kids are the way they are due to lack of discipline. If it hurts her feelings than that her problem she needs to be told to teach her child how to behave appropriately not be allowed to let her kid be a bully !! It's no different if your child is a bully at school, the school calls and it's up to the parents to check their behaviour. Better she learns now than when he is an out of control teenager !
    Wow are you serious? It no way compares to a school age child that is much more socially developed and able to reason. A toddler is impulsive and socially underdeveloped, they need to be shown and taught the right way to behave.

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    Ch'n need support and guidance to play `nice' Simply reacting after a child has pushed/hit/bittern etc....is pretty useless. In a playgroup situation, as much as we want to chat and have a cup of tea - we actually need to help our ch'n learn the niceties of playing near/alongside each other.

    A child who pushes/hits may be feeling a whole range of things in an environment which is unfamiliar, with ch'n and adults they don't know, and rules that may not be aware of.

    To call a two year old a `bully' has no developmental basis - and labels the child, rather than trying to understand the reason behind the behaviour

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mummato4 View Post
    It's been my experience that these sorts of kids are the way they are due to lack of discipline. If it hurts her feelings than that her problem she needs to be told to teach her child how to behave appropriately not be allowed to let her kid be a bully !! It's no different if your child is a bully at school, the school calls and it's up to the parents to check their behaviour. Better she learns now than when he is an out of control teenager !
    The 'bully' is TWO. For gods sake give the mother a break! It's a well known fact that two year olds can be a bit like this. My DS wasn't too bad, luckily, but my nephew who is two is going through a rough stage and I can assure you that it's not from lack of discipline. My sister is quite strict actually, but her son is a chip off the old block and very head strong! She's doing the best she can but at this stage a lot of it is just close monitoring of him and prevention.

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    It's very difficult isn't it? It sounds as though she has a very passive parenting style, which "might" be one of the reasons her child does what he does, because he can get away with it!
    If it were my child I would be firm and remove him from the situation. A short time out every time they do something out of order. Sure, kids that age don't have impulse control or social skills, but it is OUR job to teach it to them. It doesn't sound like she is doing that effectively.
    But unfortunately there is nothing much you can do . Keep your kids away as much as possible.


 

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