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  1. #1
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    Default Did you always know your child was on the spectrum?

    When you first noticed something different about your child/ren did you think straight away that it was ASD or something else? I seem to be changing my mind every day - we are going through assessment for DS2 and one minute I am sure he is on the ASD the next I think there is no way. Is it like that for everyone?

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    I was the same as you, I went through phases of "yes seems like he could be" then "nah it's just coincidental behaviours" (which I now know was denial), but I always ALWAYS knew there was SOMETHING not right about him, I just wasn't sure what.

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    Yup with both. And thats because no two children with asd are the same.

    With ds#1 i always knew there was something wrong, but i didnt think it could or would be classic autism, i had so much turmoil getting a dx, petrified i wouldnt be taken seriously, petrified it was all in my head. And petrified it would be autism.

    With ds#2 i knew once he turned one. We started the dx process before his second birthday and by 2.5yrs it was clear to everyone and i didnt feel like i needed to convince anyone. But i still had doubts, he is the opposite of ds#2 and i thout maybe he was just really really naughty tempery etx.

    Its so hard with the internet too, heaps of sites stating symptoms are either for really severe cases, or... They tick some of the boxes, not others, which raises doubt etc.

    The dx process is such a rough gig.

    Goodluck xox
    Last edited by Zombie_eyes; 19-05-2012 at 20:24.

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    Yep.. Since the day he was born, no joke. When he was born I kept thinking (and saying) he looks not right.. He doesn't seem right, something is wrong. It wasn't until a year later my Mum had the guts to tell me that the first time she saw my son she too felt uneasy about him, that something wasn't right (she's had 3 kids and held plenty of babies). As he got older and we had issues (small ones) I would Google... Every issue he had that concerned me always would show up under autism, aspergers or sensory processing. He was officially dx'd about 3 weeks ago with Aspergers.

    Even now, when hes at home with us or with close friends I think "He's alright, it can't be aspergers.. Hes not like other kids with AS" but then I go to the play ground, kindy or at work and see and talk to other 4 year olds and the difference hits me in the face.

    Wouldn't change him for the world.. Because of him I have developed a passion I never knew and that is to work with kids with disability :-)

    ***Sent from my phone***

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    Zombie_eyes  (19-05-2012)

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    Happy2be3 - its exactly the same for us, we haveno 'normal' to compare too, when we are at home, we dont think there is anything different about the boys. Bt in social settings, bam. Like a punch to the face.

    But to us, perfect.

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    That is basically how I feel, I know there is deffo something, so far he has a speech delay and multiple SPDs, but we are already in EI and OT and because he enjoys being there with the ladies - they all say it can
    t be autism - he is social with them, he looks them in the eye and initiates play. But he doesn't do that with other kids ever, he has never hugged his twin brother, if we are in the play centre or something my other kids make friends and go roaring around the place, he goes off by himself and plays on his own. He is good with some adults but not with kids, so because they keep telling me its not ASD then I start to believe them, I feel like I am on a see saw.

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    From the moment my oldest son was born I had an overwhelming urge to protect him... unlike anything I've felt with my other 4 children. From the time he was 5mths old I knew there was something different about him.

    He was diagnosed at 4 with ADHD but again I still knew there was more to it. I've always felt he was on the spectrum but they only ever focused on the ADHD.

    Then when he was 22 I finally got his diagnosed with an ID, but again I still know there is more to it. I am in the process of having him diagnosed with ASD, several of his carers and case manager agree with me. It's been a long time coming.

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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Beebs, my sons are great with adults! But if another child approaches them, they bolt for the hills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DiamondEyes View Post
    Beebs, my sons are great with adults! But if another child approaches them, they bolt for the hills.
    I really gotta stop listening to people! Not you guys, but have you noticed when you start down this route every single person has a neighbour, cousin friend whose child didn't talk till they were 3 and now they are a rocket scientist etc. Heaps of people say all the time "maybe he is just shy", "maybe he is just a slow talker", "maybe he doesn't like kids" etc etc. I know they think they are helping - but they aren't, I find it really frustrating!

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    I know, i so know, ive heard it all.

    Boys are lazy
    Boys are slower than girls
    I have an uncle whos friends son didnt talk until he was 5 and he is just fine!
    He isnt talking because u cater to him too much
    Your child is scared of other kids because he is a wuss
    Hi, i saw your update that your ds#1 has autism, are you sure? When i saw him last (2 YEARS ago) he seemed fine, just shy..


    And sooo on and sooo on and so on.


    Eugh!

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    Happy2be3  (20-05-2012),twotrunks  (20-05-2012)


 

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