View Poll Results: If you weaned your baby before 6 months of age, what was the main reason?

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  • sore/cracked nipples

    2 9.09%
  • low supply (or concern baby not getting enough)

    12 54.55%
  • mastitis

    1 4.55%
  • severe nipple pain (thrush, vasospasm, dermatitis)

    0 0%
  • attachment problems (including flat/inverted nipples)

    5 22.73%
  • medical condition - mother (inc. PND)

    5 22.73%
  • medical condition - baby

    2 9.09%
  • return to work

    5 22.73%
  • social pressure (inc. feeding in public discomfort)

    1 4.55%
  • didnt want to bf in the first place (felt pressureto start)

    3 13.64%
  • wanted partner to help

    0 0%
  • fussy/unsettled baby

    2 9.09%
  • food or other intolerance affecting baby through milk (inc. reflux/colic)

    1 4.55%
  • too tiring/mum too run down

    5 22.73%
  • just sick of it

    2 9.09%
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  1. #21
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    Its interesting to read how each mothers' story is so unique, and yet the results of the poll are showing the majority of mothers who weaned before 6 months did so for 2 major reasons - low supply and attachment problems. I think even in this small sample size, this reflects what often shows up in major studies on this topic.

    It also sounds like, despite many major obstacles, many of the mums who have replied really did want to breastfeed, and persisted through some really difficult and complex situations to meet their own goal about how long they had wanted to breastfeed. I am amazed and inspired by how so many of you tried so incredibly hard, and how long you persisted through such difficulty. I am also saddened to read about the feelings of failure and trauma that some of you are describing. You all did an amazing job from where I am sitting.

    It makes me even more determined to want to find a way to avoid those difficulties in the first place, if that is possible (and quite clearly for many it is not possible - as seen in this thread as well as the other thread on this topic). The journey continues..

    I feel like inspector clueso

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    LillyPonds  (17-05-2012)

  3. #22
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    I was kind of the opposite in a way. I expected BF to be really hard, and when I started doing it in the hospital I was amazed by how easy it was, and how I enjoyed that closeness with DD.

    I left the hospital after 4 nights, not realising that my milk hadn't come in. I'm guessing DD was only having colostrum up until that point.

    On day 5, at home, I woke up with full on engorgement. Rock hard ginormous very painful b00bs. I'm lucky in that my MIL is a midwife, and she came to stay for a few days to help with the feeding.

    And it went fine for a few days. A bit tricky/ painful at times, and I got a few lovebites when I got the attachment wrong, but generally okay.

    And then my milk disappeared. I don't know what happened. My b00bs deflated, and nothing more would come out. DD lost weight every time we weighed her.

    I tried Motilium, fenugreek, Guinness(!), eating 'the right' foods, etc. Nothing. I tried expressing round the clock, and having DD attached (skin to skin) as much as possible. Nothing. When I expressed hardly anything came out - not even enough to put into a bottle - just a dribble.

    We had to put her on formula, as the weight loss continued, but I kept pumping/ attaching to try to get my supply up. It was heartbreaking watching DH give her a bottle whilst I was pumping away with nothing coming out.

    I saw different lactation consultants, and took advice from all the usual channels, and in the end the advice I got (from several LCs) was to stop as, for some reason, I wasn't producing milk.

    When I stopped that was it. No soreness, no drying out - there was nothing there to dry out. DD was happy and gaining weight, so we left it there.

    For a long time I was pretty devastated. I felt that I'd failed. I had to have fertility assistance to have her, I'd ended up with a c-section (when I'd hoped for a natural birth), and then I couldn't feed. I felt like the biggest failure as a mother. My OB warned these were risk factors for PND, and about a year later I was diagnosed with mild PND.

    I'm okay now. I don't care that she was FF, as she hit all her milestones early, she's very healthy, and is everything we could dream of (and more). I don't care how she came out. All I care about is who she is now.

    But we're now going through IVF for #2, and while I plan to BF I am so scared of it not working out. Not because I think FF is bad. DD turned out AWESOMELY being FF, and I also find FF more convenient/ easier/ nicer than I ever did BF. But because I'm scared of the effect it might have on me if it doesn't work out. It's easy to be rational about it now, but not so easy when hormonal/ vulnerable as a new mum.

    That's partly (or mostly) why I get so angry when people push natural birth/ BF in a way that doesn't allow for other choices/ means. I think people who have never gone through that struggle really have no idea.

    Sorry for the essay!

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    LillyPonds  (17-05-2012)

  5. #23
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    With DS1 I successfully BF for 12 months.

    When DS2 came along, I struggled with poor attachment, cracked bleeding nipples, DS2 vomiting bloodied milk, mastitis 3 times in as many weeks. It got to the point where I converted to full time expressing. I kept this up for 4.5months until my supply started dropping. We were also dealing with reflux on top of this.

    Eventually my supply dried up altogether and so we moved onto formula from 5 months. I'm quite disappointed to be honest. I had underestimated the challenge as I had had a somewhat easy ride with my first baby and fully expected to do the same with my second.
    Last edited by 2Bboys; 17-05-2012 at 18:29.

  6. #24
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    my reason isnt there wrong info from a peadiatricion

  7. #25
    futureherder is offline Child led parent here...save me :)
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    I consider that DD self weaned so that option was not there, I tried everything to feed on the breast, we had good attachment there was milk there, went to LCs osteo etc it eventually got to the point where she screamed any time I put her to the breast, the only time by 6 months that I got a feed in was at 4 in the morning when she was half asleep.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl X View Post
    I was kind of the opposite in a way. I expected BF to be really hard, and when I started doing it in the hospital I was amazed by how easy it was, and how I enjoyed that closeness with DD.

    I left the hospital after 4 nights, not realising that my milk hadn't come in. I'm guessing DD was only having colostrum up until that point.

    On day 5, at home, I woke up with full on engorgement. Rock hard ginormous very painful b00bs. I'm lucky in that my MIL is a midwife, and she came to stay for a few days to help with the feeding.
    Girl X - That sounds like a really difficult and disappointing time . I was just reading your story, and I remembered reading in a BF book once that pathalogic engorgement as you have described can lead to catastrophic down regulation of milk supply, and in some cases loss of milk altogether. I am wondering if this may have contributed to your sudden loss of milk. This is what is says on risks of severe early engorgement in one case study "The mother [affected by pathologic engorgement in the early days] has unusually flaccid breasts for Day 12 post partum. Her milk supply is decreased and her baby has not regained birth weight. She described intensely painful engorgement characterized by full tight breasts. Although the baby was put to the breast frequently, he was unable to latch well to her tight breast tissue, and mostly slept at the breast. Because her milk was not beign regularly removed, down regulation of her supply occurred. The situation on day 12 mimics that of a woman who never initiated lactation, and whose milk supply has been allowed to dry up. The woman never regained a full milk supply in spite of an aggressive regimen of pumping and the use of a galactagogue." (from the breastfeeding atlas)

    One thing that may be reassuring is that engorgement in a second lactation is usually not as severe; as well, if you'd like extra information on managing engorgement you're welcome to PM me and I can send you some. . Cold packs and reverse pressure softening have been helpful in these cases. So things may be different for you next time. It sounds like you have the right approach and outlook though if things don't work out as you would like.

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    Bubbles10  (17-05-2012)

  10. #27
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    bumping to see if we can get any last minute voters for the poll!!


 

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