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    Default "spin off" did you walk to school as a child

    And will you let your own child?
    Spin off from the leaving your kids unattended thread !
    our school was a 20 minute drive away and mum dropped us throughout primary school, high school we caught the train, my sister drives my 17 year old niece to and from school her whole life and she is the most independent , responsible teenager I know, so why do some people think a child becomes independent by walking to school?

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    Never walked on my own. Not until I was in year 8 and even then it was only a short walk.

    I won't be letting my kids walk to school on their own. Already this year we've had 2 notes home about attempted abductions. I'm not going to risk losing my child just because walking alone promotes independence. I don't know if I'll ever allow them to, even in high school, but I will say it depends on where we live and where the school is located. If it's crossing the street, I might think about it.

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    I didnt until high school because my mum was a sahm and school was too far away

    But my sister is started walking last year she was in yr 5 and she has had so many comments made

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    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
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    I did and i will let DS. Apart from the extremely important aspect of incidental exercise, I think it is so so important for kids to learn how to negotiate situations on their own, with no adults to help them. People are always saying on here 'oh it's so unfair to expect an older kid to be responsible for younger siblings' but i completely disagree. The pride and sense of accomplishment we all felt when one if the little kids walking home tripped over and sprained their ankle, some if us ran to the milk bar and asked them to call our parents and we were all showered with praise about how well we'd dealt with the situation and how mature we all were.
    I think it's also important for kids to have to deal with all sorts of people, not just their friends. The kids we walked home with we didn't play with at school, but we all got along very well.
    For us it also combatted bullying, it wasn't condoned by any of the kids walking home. Kids are willing to step up to the plate when there's no adults around.


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    My brother and I walked together a short distance when I was in year 1 and him year 4, then a bigger distance when I was in year 4. From years 5 - 7 I walked on my own, and year 7 was a long distance, like half an hour walk cause we moved house. Sometimes I rode my bike and occasionally I caught the bus a few stops.

    High school I caught the train an hour and a half each way! Ugh.

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    Gothel is offline Skip the drama, stay with Mama!
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    I walked on my own from the start. Mum would help me across the road, then i walked about 20m down the street and straight in the school gate.

    One of the upsides of growing up in a small town

    ETA we're lookng at two schools for the girls, one 1km away and the other 3km. It doesn't matter which they go to, it will be too far for them to go alone they get well up in the school.
    Last edited by Gothel; 17-05-2012 at 08:35.

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    I was in New Zealand so started school on my 5th birthday (in march). My mother drove me to school until midyear, then I walked alone for the remainder of the year.

    The following year I was able to ride a bike, so rode with my brother. He was 4½ years older than me and quickly moved up to high school, so I was back to travelling alone.

    I remember at one stage, mid primary school, I would walk with my father to his work (an abattoir), then continue on to school alone.

    =================

    My primary school children are allowed to walk together. Later primary (9yo+) is allowed to walk solo with a mobile phone, but I prefer them to walk with a friend if possible.

    From high school, they may walk solo.
    Last edited by sweetseven; 17-05-2012 at 10:26.

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    I rode my bike or walked to school occassionally, with older siblings and cousins from about 8 yo. It was a pretty good 3km walk.

    In high school I walked to the bus stop a good 1.5km away every day.

    FL brings up a good point about the pride of accomplishment. I remember beaming with pride the first time I rode my bike all the way to school and back. I also remember the day there was a black snake on the road on the way home from school one day and how we kids came up with a plan to negotiate our way around it.

    My DD, nearly 8, lives to far from school to walk, but she does walk to the bus stop, 300 m along a bush track by herself.

    Shockingly many kids here in our farming community drive themselves to the bus stop in their paddock bomb cars, including our 14 yo neighbour, who has done so since the age of 11. (driving thru paddocks, or on private roads). I'm not sure how I feel about that from a safety perspective.

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    I walked to school with my younger brother from the age of eight.

    However, we lived in a small country town and the school was only four doors down (mum would watch us from the front verandah).

    In that situation I would probably do the same as my mother. However, we live within 5 kms of the CBD and to get to DD's proposed primary school you need to cross two very busy roads. It is only 3 blocks away so we will be walking to school but DD will not be walking alone (at least not in early primary school).

    I'm not sure when I will be comfortable with her navigating in busy traffic alone, I'm guessing by the end of primary school but I will see when we get there.

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    Yes, but my mum walked with me. I will walk to school with DS (providing its within walking distance) I wouldnt feel comfortable with him walking alone until at least 14/15 yrs I reckon. Boys don't understand danger until they're about 30 years old!!!


 

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