+ Reply to Thread
Page 13 of 14 FirstFirst ... 311121314 LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 136
  1. #121
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,776
    Thanks
    5,212
    Thanked
    7,063
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Massive hugs DOTF. For what it's worth I'm in awe that you breastfed her for as long as you did. You're freaking incredible and I wish you could see that, too.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Benji For This Useful Post:

    Etienne  (17-05-2012),misskittyfantastico  (16-05-2012)

  3. #122
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    I would like to see that too. I think the older ones in particular are still in the mode of pushing the babies face into the boob and the usual cradle hold. I'm embarrassed to admit until I came on BH just after my DS was born I didn't even know you just let them attach on your own. The newer ones seem more patient and more knowledgeable with the child led type bfing.

  4. #123
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Lots of hugs for you DAF you have been in, and are still in a really difficult and complex situation. You are not a bad mum, far from it As I said earlier in this thread, we do the best with can with resources we have and the cards we're dealt.

  5. #124
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,776
    Thanks
    5,212
    Thanked
    7,063
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by misskittyfantastico View Post
    I wish midwives were all LC's and that they were *good* ones. I was so fortunate to have *one* amazing midwife (that I never saw again) on my first night after having DD that told me I could lay down and feed. Something so darn simple! And this was in the private system.

    If I'd gone public, I'd have been out after 1 night.

    We are set up to fail.
    I couldn't work out how to breastfeed DS after the traumatic birth and he just wouldn't open his mouth nor did he want to feed. It was four hours since his last so the hospital made me fill in a chart that I had to fill every four hours on the dot when I fed him I hit the buzzer and a friendly midwife came in but when I told her my issues she just shrugged and said she wasn't sure why he wouldn't latch.

    If it wasn't for my mum and my friend, I would have had no CLUE how to breastfeed DS. A lot of new mums just don't have this kind of backup as their mums and friends may not have breastfed.

  6. #125
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by purplecat View Post
    I think there might be a misunderstanding here - because I agree with you - the figures according to medical reasons are that 5% of women cant breastfeed (not 2%), but I personally think the mothers with complex issues as you have described should also be included, and I would love to know what percentage of mothers stop due to those types of very difficult circumstances. I am interested to know what percentage of mothers stop feeding at 1 month who fall outside these 2 categories of 'cant' breastfeed (ie what percentage of mothers stop for simpler and more fixable reasons?), because those are the mums we can help. Does that make sense? Sorry my post was too long so it probably all got lost in translation...


    (The 2% came from the number of mums who breastfeed to 2 years and beyond, which is what all the fuss was about after the TIME mag - a fuss over what only 2% of people do).
    yes you're right, sorry I'm sleep deprived and mixed up the stats. But yes I agree, the emotional stuff should be part of it too, as with the other things I listed. Bc when you have a child that simply will not attach full stop, well it's impossible to bf. It wasn't a choice. So therefore I couldn't.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    purplecat  (16-05-2012)

  8. #126
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,700
    Thanks
    358
    Thanked
    503
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DaughteroftheForest View Post
    I could not agree with this more! To this day I still struggle with guilt over 'giving up' on breastfeeding my third baby. I fed my first for 25 months, I fed my second through my third pregnancy and up until she was 26 months. I tandem fed with my third baby until she was 3 months old. I'm pretty sure I continued breastfeeding my toddler for a week or so after my baby weaned. She still asks for boob when she's upset and it's been eight weeks since she weaned. It breaks my heart

    I know logically that after having the stress of having a baby in NICU, living in the hospital for 8 weeks, being hospitalized myself at 2 weeks PP for a nasty uterine infection, that reoccurred twice afterward, the ensuing anti biotics, the fact the doctors had her limited to a 15 minute breastfeed every three hours because breathing was already so much work that feeding needed to be easy or she'd just use up the calories she was getting from my milk in the time she spent drinking it - after all of that I'm actually fairly proud that I made it as far as I did. But by three months I had barely any supply, if I hadn't had my toddler still feeding I would have had nothing. I knew I could continue to struggle, continue taking pills and supplements and lactation cookies to up my supply, I could have kept pumping and crying because after 20 minutes I would get 20mls out of both boobs combined. But realistically - and here's the kicker - I was *missing out* on my baby by doing all of those things. I missed the first few weeks of her life because I was so lost in grief that this wasn't how things were meant to be, and I continued missing out on just enjoying her because I was so intent, so stubborn, so tenacious about breastfeeding her.

    I still feel like a bad mother because I don't breastfeed my DD2. Because of her condition, she needs it more than my other children did and they both fed for at least 21 months longer than her but I didn't stop because I didn't want it enough, or because I didn't have the education or support to continue. I stopped because at a certain point it became too. Effing. Hard.
    You are absolutely positively NOT a bad mother, a bad mother neglects her child, a bad mother abuses her child, a bad mother feeds her child things that do not meet his or her nutritional requirements.

    A GOOD mother makes a decision based on her personal experience on what will benefit her entire family as a whole and continues to meet her childs nutritional needs.

    Breast feeding is NOT and should NEVER be an I am better than you card.

    Ds is 23 months and still breast fed (despite growing pressure to ween him) I have had to deal with a very painful birth and stressful 3 days where I had to buzz a midwife for every feed, mastitis at 2 weeks requiring antibiotics, 1 week hospitalization for Ds at 7 weeks after he contracted rsv which led to full blown bronchiolitis (nil by mouth for 3 1/2 days, I didn't start expressing for 24 hours after hospitalisation)

    A respiratory infection at 4 months, croup 3 times from 12-14 months, tonsillitis (twice) at 16 months and a reaction to the antibiotics.

    And re occurring nipple agony since 18 months til now.

    I hope to nurse all my babies as I find it is easier for me than bottles and formula.

    BUT if at any time a mother is questioning if nursing is having a negative impact on herself OR her family then she should br supported with her decision to choose breast or formula NOT told she 'wasnt determined enough'

    Sent from my MB526 using BubHub

  9. #127
    DaughteroftheForest's Avatar
    DaughteroftheForest is offline Sometimes you have to forget what you want in order to remember what you deserve
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,049
    Thanks
    784
    Thanked
    492
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Thanks ladies, like I said, logically I know that I made the only choice I could. But there is still a lot of grief and guilt mixed up in for me. And people making broad, sweeping statements about formulae feeders not wanting it enough just breaks my heart. I still vividly remember going down to NICU to pump out a feed for my newborn and while I was changing her nappy she just stopped breathing I tried pumping after she had been revived but there was no way in the world the milk was going to come, so I agreed to her first formula top up. I went upstairs to my hospital room, curled up in bed and just wept because all I could think of was how I had just destroyed her virgin gut.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to DaughteroftheForest For This Useful Post:

    beebs  (19-05-2012)

  11. #128
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,776
    Thanks
    5,212
    Thanked
    7,063
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Oh honey, that made me cry I can't imagine how you must've felt and I do know how desperately you wanted it.

  12. #129
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17,747
    Thanks
    5,085
    Thanked
    8,691
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by DaughteroftheForest View Post
    Thanks ladies, like I said, logically I know that I made the only choice I could. But there is still a lot of grief and guilt mixed up in for me. And people making broad, sweeping statements about formulae feeders not wanting it enough just breaks my heart. I still vividly remember going down to NICU to pump out a feed for my newborn and while I was changing her nappy she just stopped breathing I tried pumping after she had been revived but there was no way in the world the milk was going to come, so I agreed to her first formula top up. I went upstairs to my hospital room, curled up in bed and just wept because all I could think of was how I had just destroyed her virgin gut.
    Oh babe xxx You were and you are playing an entirely different ball game. We know (a we in that you and I share similar parenting philosophies) what is optimum, we know what we're striving for but we do our best.

  13. #130
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    231
    Thanks
    70
    Thanked
    31
    Reviews
    0
    I was breast fed till I was 5... I breastfed my first daughter until she was 1. Alot of this was done using a breast pump which made life alot easier for me anyway.
    My second daughter was breast fed until she was 3 months old, but I would have liked to have breast fed her for longer, but I couldn't because of not having enough support at home to do so. I don't think it matters very much how long you should breast feed your baby.
    Both of my daughters have been fine with breast milk and formula.
    When I breast fed my first daughter, she had a nasal gastric tube, and this did make it alot easier for me, and also I was not as self-conscious about feeding her, as I was using the breast pump at home (and in public toilets) and then feeding her.
    I have been told that feeding my baby until she was 1 years old was too short of a time to breast feed, at the time I thought this person was very rude, and didn't listen to him. I did not explain to that person that I had had a baby in hospital for 3 months, and that she had been fed with a tube for most of her baby life. When she was 1 she went through a food clinic stay in hospital for 1 week, to get her used to eating normally, as she wasn't. I went through alot of hard work, just because I wanted to breast feed my child, but tbh, if I felt more confident to formula feed (sounds backwards I know), I would have saved myself alot of hassle. In fact, breast milk is only as good in nutritional value, as the mother who is nutritionally healthy. Formula would have been better for my child, if I had neglected my nutritional health.


 

Similar Threads

  1. New young mum.
    By tlakat in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 12-07-2012, 17:06

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pyjamas.com.au
With so many gorgeous brands and styles for every season, our pyjamas, nighties, robes, sleepsuits and sleeping bags are lovely for lights out and perfect for lazy days. Get 10% off first order using code bubhub. Be quick offer ends 31/12/16.
sales & new stuffsee all
The Health Hub
Give a new mum a fitness boost for Christmas & New Year. Studio-based, small group training sessions - cardio, strength, core, Pilates & boxing. Choice of 16 hrs per week, flexible-arrival feature - bubs & kids welcome! Gift vouchers available.
featured supporter
KindyROO
KindyROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. Classes are available at three Brisbane and two Gold Coast locations. Enrol today & help your child to reach their full potential. Visit the website to find out more.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!