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  1. #1
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    Default What age for a puppy?

    As the title states, what age is a good one for a puppy?
    My dd keeps telling dh and I she wants a "new asuka" for christmas...
    Asuka was the name of our old dog who we had to have put to sleep at age 4, when dd was 1.
    She tells us all the time she misses her and what she used to do with her and how she reaaaaallllly wants a nEa puppy.
    Dd will be 3 at Christmas and I am wondering if this will be too much to take on??
    Opinions please?!
    ETA-Asuka was a pure breed dog and so will this future dog, from the same breeder.
    Last edited by kezanazz; 06-05-2012 at 21:16.

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    Our 3 year old DD loves our dog, she spends hours playing with him. I think this depends how much responsibility you intend to put on your DD, feeding bathing etc.. I know ours is too young for that. So our dog is purely enjoyment to our DD and no responsibility and I don't think there is an age restriction on that

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    Any age should be ok.

    But please don't buy a dog from a puppy farm at a pet shop. Google Oscars Law. Poor dogs, just breaks my heart.
    Why not wait for the puppy you want at the RSPCA?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wippy View Post
    Any age should be ok.

    But please don't buy a dog from a puppy farm at a pet shop. Google Oscars Law. Poor dogs, just breaks my heart.
    Why not wait for the puppy you want at the RSPCA?
    I would never buy from a puppy farm or a pet shop.
    The puppy I want will never be at the RSPCA.
    Asuka was a Boston terrier and this puppy will be too.
    She had a genetic condition which meant she needed to be put down and as such was covered by the breeders guarantee- just a matter of when to get it

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    Well it's good that you're going with a registered breeder. It is really the best way to get a family pet.

    Things to consider, she won't be a help with the dog or the puppy. She'll be a patter, a player, a friend. But she won't walk it out to the yard at 3 in the morning to let it go to the toilet. The puppy, and ultimately the adult dog, will be 100% your responsibility.
    Most families make this mistake "The kids want a puppy, they promise they'll take care of it". Kids don't do that. They want a puppy so they have an interesting new toy, they don't want to devote an hour's training daily, take it out every hour on the dot for toilet, leash train it....they just want a toy.
    Remember that the dog will be yours, for the rest of it's life.

    As you probably already know, puppies often whine, bark or howl for the first few nights {sometimes weeks} in a new home. Consider the noise level and where the pup will be kept during this time. Noise is greatly cut back if you crate train and have the crate in your room at night.
    If the only place you want to keep it is in the cold laundry next to DD's room, then expect that she will be woken up by howling at night for a few weeks.

    Second, puppy and child behaviour. How grown up is your child? Google 'DOG SAFE for kids' {it's a new way to teach kids how to act around dogs}.

    If she's not mature enough to learn basic dog body language, don't get a dog. Young children who can't tell when the dog is throwing out "please leave me alone! please!" signs get bitten and mauled. Make sure you know these signs as well and know how to prevent accidents.

    Do you know how to deal with normal puppy behavour? If the puppy starts nibbling at the baby's fingers are you going to beat it within an inch of it's life and then throw it outside, or are you going to buy it food-based chewing toys and redirect the biting?

    You've already had the breed so I won't add any info on that. Just do the regular, ask for health test results from the breeder, read your buyer's contract carefully, ask questions, ask for HD and ED, and possibly vWD scores from the parents.

    Another option is to ask around for breeders that have adults for sale. One of our Wolfhounds is an older exhibition dog, already leash and toilet trained, already socialised, already crate trained, perfect.

    Here's a list of Vic breeders, ask around for those that have young children at home as well.

    http://www.dogzonline.com.au/breeds/...=VIC&Submit=Go

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    We plan on getting a puppy ( Italian mastiff ) when DS is 3, mainly because I will need to spend a lot of time initially with training etc and as pp said puppies are pretty much like newborns as they need constant interaction! Plus we wanted DS to be a bit bigger as the dog will be huge ! He is 18 months now and loves his cousins Labrador which helps as he is around dogs all the time

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToughLove View Post
    Well it's good that you're going with a registered breeder. It is really the best way to get a family pet.

    Things to consider, she won't be a help with the dog or the puppy. She'll be a patter, a player, a friend. But she won't walk it out to the yard at 3 in the morning to let it go to the toilet. The puppy, and ultimately the adult dog, will be 100% your responsibility.
    Most families make this mistake "The kids want a puppy, they promise they'll take care of it". Kids don't do that. They want a puppy so they have an interesting new toy, they don't want to devote an hour's training daily, take it out every hour on the dot for toilet, leash train it....they just want a toy.
    Remember that the dog will be yours, for the rest of it's life.

    As you probably already know, puppies often whine, bark or howl for the first few nights {sometimes weeks} in a new home. Consider the noise level and where the pup will be kept during this time. Noise is greatly cut back if you crate train and have the crate in your room at night.
    If the only place you want to keep it is in the cold laundry next to DD's room, then expect that she will be woken up by howling at night for a few weeks.

    Second, puppy and child behaviour. How grown up is your child? Google 'DOG SAFE for kids' {it's a new way to teach kids how to act around dogs}.

    If she's not mature enough to learn basic dog body language, don't get a dog. Young children who can't tell when the dog is throwing out "please leave me alone! please!" signs get bitten and mauled. Make sure you know these signs as well and know how to prevent accidents.

    Do you know how to deal with normal puppy behavour? If the puppy starts nibbling at the baby's fingers are you going to beat it within an inch of it's life and then throw it outside, or are you going to buy it food-based chewing toys and redirect the biting?

    You've already had the breed so I won't add any info on that. Just do the regular, ask for health test results from the breeder, read your buyer's contract carefully, ask questions, ask for HD and ED, and possibly vWD scores from the parents.

    Another option is to ask around for breeders that have adults for sale. One of our Wolfhounds is an older exhibition dog, already leash and toilet trained, already socialised, already crate trained, perfect.

    Here's a list of Vic breeders, ask around for those that have young children at home as well.

    http://www.dogzonline.com.au/breeds/...=VIC&Submit=Go
    Yea, I know it will be my responsibility ultimately, just as it was previously.
    We have a doggy door at our place so taking it outside is not a big thing...also wouldn't dream of making it sleep in te laundry or any cold room and we aren't a fan of crating.

    All puppies of theirs have all genetic tests and aren't sold if not 100%.

    Dd is quite mature and she does understand quite well.

    Mainly after some feedback of what age worked for you, and what age you think you should have waited...

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    Quote Originally Posted by kezanazz View Post
    Yea, I know it will be my responsibility ultimately, just as it was previously.
    We have a doggy door at our place so taking it outside is not a big thing...also wouldn't dream of making it sleep in te laundry or any cold room and we aren't a fan of crating.

    All puppies of theirs have all genetic tests and aren't sold if not 100%.

    Dd is quite mature and she does understand quite well.

    Mainly after some feedback of what age worked for you, and what age you think you should have waited...

    I actually recommend rethinking your stance on crating very highly if you have a young child. The crate is a safe place, and if you teach that once the dog is in the crate it must be left alone, the dog always has somewhere to escape to. That way it has an alternative to snapping.
    It also makes car trips, visitors, vet overnight stays, boarding stays and puppy issues like chewing far easier to deal with.
    I don't know what I would have done without my crate with Horse, he could not stop following DD around in her walker and at 16 weeks he was taller than it, so his excited slobbering went all over her.

    I'm a dog trainer, come from four generations of dog breeders and am involved in the exhibition scene, so our dog-owning circumstances were different than the usual family's.
    We already had two Great Danes, a Wolfhound and a Dobermann when we had DD.
    She's five now and we have two Danes, two Wolfies and we're on the list for an ETT, which will be DD's special friend. She's been doing junior handling for shows for a year now and has been helping some breeders with pup socialisation and training, so with supervision and help she'll be training it for agility by herself.

    I can't say what the right age is for you, I can only give advice on how it will be with a pup and a young kid at the same time, so that you have the appropriate info to think over before you make a decision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kezanazz View Post
    I would never buy from a puppy farm or a pet shop.
    The puppy I want will never be at the RSPCA.
    Asuka was a Boston terrier and this puppy will be too.
    She had a genetic condition which meant she needed to be put down and as such was covered by the breeders guarantee- just a matter of when to get it
    Thank you!

    You could visit the RSPCA and if a Boston terrier becomes available they will call you. It's worth a try.

    I remain skeptical about breeders. Let's face it, making two dogs have sex isn't exactly a skill. And there's so many shonks out there inbreeding or doing anything just for the cash.
    Still far better than puppy farms though.
    Good luck.

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    Any age really. Our pets are only ever those in need who are homeless, I don't think I could get a dog from a breeder or a pet shop or advertised from someone's back yard.

    The dog will be a family pet, with you as the mum and is as individual as deciding t extend the family with a new baby. Time and money are a consideration. If your child needs a lot of time, someimes buying a dog would be highly beneficial, sometimes it will be bringing someone into the family that you don't have time for. You know your child's personality. When we got ours, dd was in Prep and I worked 4 days/week from 9 to 3. Plenty of time to spend with the puppy. He turns 3 this year and only really needed a lot of time in the first few months. Once he learnt some manners and worked out his place in the family and how the family works, and was on 2 feeds/day he didn't need quite as much time.

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