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  1. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    I was on newstart when pregnant and lost my job, because I was pregnant. It is hard getting a job when you are six months pregnant. I didn't get one, the whole 7 months I was on newstart for. They never cut my newstart because of it. I then had my son and started full-time study when he was 10 months, which has not been easy. My point is, that newstart will be very flexible for those who need to find specific jobs, and will allow you to train as well. 8 years is a long enough time to develop skills and learn a trade or get a tertiary degree. People are acting as if the Government is cutting off benefits the first day of school and parents are totally unprepared for it. 8 years is a long time to prepare for it, and should circumstances have arisen during that 8 years where a mother couldn't possibly develop her skills and education, then newstart allows for that.
    There are lots of reasons a parent may not have retrained in that time. Sick, special needs child. mental health, simply an intense child that leaves no space for study. Low prior education that makes teriary education a challenge, poor reading and writing skills. NESB...I have a career to fall back on when I return to work, but had I needed to study, without DH in DS's 4 years of life I'm not sure I could of managed. My child doesn't stop. Ever. It would have been very hard to sit and do assignments while he's running around, drawing on walls etc. Yes there's the evening, but after a day with my boy, I'm struggling to put together sentences here let alone discuss in depth theories at 10pm.

    My point is that it's grey. What if I was to say, why didn't you go to uni before you had kids like I did? I made the right choices and you didn't. I think you would explain there were lots of reasons why that was so, right?

  2. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clementine Grace View Post
    We couldn't figure out where the big cut is?
    The cut is around $100 p/t and for a single parent already struggling, this is going to break their backs. It may not be a large sum to you, but for many it will.

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  4. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    There are lots of reasons a parent may not have retrained in that time. Sick, special needs child. mental health, simply an intense child that leaves no space for study. Low prior education that makes teriary education a challenge, poor reading and writing skills. NESB...I have a career to fall back on when I return to work, but had I needed to study, without DH in DS's 4 years of life I'm not sure I could of managed. My child doesn't stop. Ever. It would have been very hard to sit and do assignments while he's running around, drawing on walls etc. Yes there's the evening, but after a day with my boy, I'm struggling to put together sentences here let alone discuss in depth theories at 10pm.

    My point is that it's grey. What if I was to say, why didn't you go to uni before you had kids like I did? I made the right choices and you didn't. I think you would explain there were lots of reasons why that was so, right?
    Purely out of interest, how long do you think parents should stay on a parenting payment once their child is in school? I do understand its a grey area and there are a lot of families already doing it very tough, but if a child is in school during the day, wouldn't a few years (from 6-8) or even a few years (on newstart) after that be enough time to figure out if you will return to work or what you will do? Whether it be partnered or single? For people who disagree with it, i'm just wondering what you think would be a better solution for families?

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The cut is around $100 p/t and for a single parent already struggling, this is going to break their backs. It may not be a large sum to you, but for many it will.

    As I have said multiple times, I lost $100 per week being moved to Newstart. As delirium has said, that may not be much to some people but that reduction has meant a huge change for my child and myself and has caused a whole new host of issues.

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    I think that the main problem is that on Newstart payments are reduced due to income earned much more than on a Parenting Payment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clementine Grace View Post
    Purely out of interest, how long do you think parents should stay on a parenting payment once their child is in school? I do understand its a grey area and there are a lot of families already doing it very tough, but if a child is in school during the day, wouldn't a few years (from 6-8) or even a few years (on newstart) after that be enough time to figure out if you will return to work or what you will do? Whether it be partnered or single? For people who disagree with it, i'm just wondering what you think would be a better solution for families?
    I support SAHM's working. Despite what many of the high income earners believe, living on payments suck. Most want to move into the workforce, for better money, for self esteem, and probably to get rid of the stigma. I think around 9 is far, that's 3 years after the child goes to school to complete a degree, although some go for 4+ years...

    What I don't support is a drop in the single parent payments. Place partnered and single parents on an activity agreement, ask that they study or search for work at 6, with them staying on SPP until 9. Then put them on Newstart but on a single parent newstart, so the same pay but obviously still requiring they attend job network meetings, apply for 4 jobs a week etc.

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  10. #117
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    I agree Delirium. I am fully supportive of the activity agreement, which I think enables women to study to get off welfare. But they should be supported through the entire time a degree takes, not dumped near the end.

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    The other thing I want to point out is that the government talk about how they are encouraging people to get back into the workforce, but it is a load of bunkum.

    They are only interested in offerring support to those that they are forcing to do something.

    At a point in time where I felt I was coping well, and could manage returning to studies, I went to Centrelink to ask what support I would be entitled to to assist me to study, and the lady behind the desk was most unhelpful. All she was interested in saying was "but you don't have to" (because my youngest child was only 2yo). When I specifically asked about childcare assistance I was told "of course" but not given any details. When I tried to press for details, I was told that I had to put my children in childcare first before they would tell me what assistance they would give me.

    I was trying to find out if studying would be viable, and not given the information I needed nor any guidance other than "but you don't have to". I thought there was a special subsection (JET) that specifically supported single parents studying or working, but when I asked about it I was told that I wouldn't get to talk to them because "I didn't have to <do anything>".

    I was really disheartened and didn't go ahead with my proposed studies.

    ==========================

    Now, in my opinion, someone is much more likely to succeed if it is something they want to do rather than something they are forced to do. They should encourage and support those that want to do something, but forcing people to do something is counterproductive.
    Last edited by sweetseven; 11-05-2012 at 18:58.

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    How sad that the government is doing this. I'm a single mum who works casually. Why don't I get the same option as a married mother to stay at home with my children if I want to?

    Why isn't that valued in society?

    Moreover the parenting payment was originally created to assist women who may have lost their husband or he left, or he was abusive etc. Many women who have trouble leaving abusive relationships will think even harder, the less support we give women.

    They have been chipping away at parenting support for years, it was already pitiful.

    I don't know why we want to become like the USA, when clearly their social support system sucks hairy dogs ballz.

    When will we learn to value women and parenting? Everyone rich or poor should have the choice to stay at home.

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    I support SAHM's working. Despite what many of the high income earners believe, living on payments suck. Most want to move into the workforce, for better money, for self esteem, and probably to get rid of the stigma. I think around 9 is far, that's 3 years after the child goes to school to complete a degree, although some go for 4+ years...

    What I don't support is a drop in the single parent payments. Place partnered and single parents on an activity agreement, ask that they study or search for work at 6, with them staying on SPP until 9. Then put them on Newstart but on a single parent newstart, so the same pay but obviously still requiring they attend job network meetings, apply for 4 jobs a week etc.
    I think something along the lines of this would be better. The bulk of single parents have no issue working but alot will still need the centrelink assistance to supplement their wage. They should stay on PPS until around 12 i reckon. At least then most children are off starting high school. They can bring in the activity agreement at a younger age and then parents have a real chance to commence studying and obtain a qualification or to get back in the workforce and start building up recent work experience.

    I personally work and study but i'm still going to be disadvantaged financially when my payments are switched over to Newstart. Thats what the problem is. It's not that i'm a bludger who doesn't want to work and i'm sure there are many more single parents in the same position.

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