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  1. #1
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    Default Autism??

    So 2 1/2 year old DS is a late talker. We had been going to a speech therapist and he was doing well, but stopped a week before the baby came. Since then, DS has improved out of sight. He's added so many words it's not funny. I think having DH around for a month and the IL's here a lot has been good for him.

    Anyway, the Speechie thought we should get him tested for Autism based on the speech delay and that he occasionally likes to line his trucks up. So we have an appt with a Paed in 3 weeks.

    But based on what I've read on Google, I think it's reaching to say he's autistic based on those 2 things. He's very affectionate and social, loving, shares well, loves to play with his friends and while he can be naughty, it's typical toddler tantrums and not all the time. He crawled and walked at the usual timeframes and from what I have read, I can't see how he could be autistic.

    Anyway, my question is, do you think it possible he has autism, or do you think the speechie was just being overly cautious? What is the diagnostic process? The paed is a two hour trip and with his speech improving, I'm really questioning if there is a need for it.

    Any opinions or advice would be appreciated.

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    Subscribing - we had similar circumstances re: slow to talk and line things up but by the time we got our appointment with the speechie he had pretty much caught up.

    He has a first cousin with autism so I had some concerns.

    Good luck!

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    Californication  (03-05-2012)

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    We have recently gone through the same process. My son had speech delay at 2, but was assessed as within the normal range at 3.

    When he was around 2, he did like to line stuff up, but he plays appropriately now, and doesn't have any sensory issues or other repetitious behaviour. He has appropriate body language, eye contact, shares things etc.

    He is very spirited though.

    He does have a severe failure to develop appropriate peer relationships though. he has no interest in other kids, and is quite terrified of them really. He is fine with adults.

    After looking at the diagnostic criteria for autism and aspergers, we decided to seek treatment for his social anxiety. I got a mental health care plan from the doctor today, and we're going to take him to a child psychologist, with a view to enrolling him in a group program for children that teaches social skills etc. If the psychologist feels there is something else, then I will take him to a developmental paed.

    My other reasoning is that even if he was autistic, it would be so mild, and he wouldn't need to see a speech therapist or an occupational therapist as he doesn't have deficiencies in those areas. so we may as well cut to the chase and address the social anxiety.

    It's a tough call. Personally, I wouldn't bother in your position, but I'm sure others would disagree with me.

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    Californication  (03-05-2012)

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    Alot of information out there, highlights severe autism.

    Both of my boys, crawled and walked right on on time, ds#2 has a huge vocab far beyond his age, BUT he doesnt understand what he says a lot of the time, so its misleading.

    Im not gonna tell you what to do, or even make an attempt to tell you what i think it is. But i do know that speechys deal with SN kids all the time, and the advice wouldnt be given lightly. Letting google get in the way of peace of mind OR potentional dx, is dangerous.

    There are so many things we as parents, believe to be fine, but professionals see more, and see problems that we dont, thats whats helpful about it. Intervention of any kind is crucial in the years leading upto school. Problems worsen when school starts and become more aparent, and its harder to rectify.

    Goodluck.

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    From what you've described, no I wouldn't even bother taking him. Late talking and occasionally lining up trucks does not indicate anything IMO, especially seeing he's so social. Plus, even if he WAS on the spectrum somewhere, it sounds like it would only be mild, and in that case they would have alot of trouble getting that diagnosed at such a young age. Most mild ASD diagnoses are not at toddler age, it's more when they are preschool/primary school when they are supposed to be developing alot socially, and are not.

    If you are at all concerned then maybe just take him for peace of mind. Good luck with your decision.

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    They can rule it in or rule it out, but no harm in testing.

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    Wouldn't you prefer to rule it out properly, even if you doubt it?

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    Californication  (03-05-2012)

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    Thanks for the replies ladies.

    MsMummy - I hope your DS responds well to treatment. It must be hard having a kid who's scared of other kids

    Quote Originally Posted by DiamondEyes View Post
    Im not gonna tell you what to do, or even make an attempt to tell you what i think it is. But i do know that speechys deal with SN kids all the time, and the advice wouldnt be given lightly. Letting google get in the way of peace of mind OR potentional dx, is dangerous.
    Firstly I just wanted to say congratulations! I rarely use the computer these days (and don't get on here much either!) so miss out on tickers etc so had no idea!!

    When you say "even make an attempt to tell you what i think it is", does that mean you think there could be something?

    You are right in that there is a lot of stuff about extreme autism and not much about the minor end of the scale, which isn't helpful as reading info out there, I just think he's not like that. I mean he lines his toys up once or twice a week if that. It's not all day every day, and he doesn't care if they get moved by us. He's social, not prone to repetitive behaviour, loving, and no different behaviour wise to his friends except for the slow talking. But I've been told SO many times that boys are slower than girls. And he understands everything and even when he wasn't talking, he made it known what he wanted.

    I get what you say about parents thinking their kid is fine, and that's why I went to see our Dr and got a referral. But our Dr doesn't think there is an issue and we were basically getting an appt to rule it out. But now the appt is close, I just wonder if it's really necessary. But I don't want to be one of those parents who has blinkers on and refuses to see there is a problem with their kid either.

    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    From what you've described, no I wouldn't even bother taking him. Late talking and occasionally lining up trucks does not indicate anything IMO, especially seeing he's so social. Plus, even if he WAS on the spectrum somewhere, it sounds like it would only be mild, and in that case they would have alot of trouble getting that diagnosed at such a young age.
    See this is what I think. I guess I am struggling with it because of those reasons. I'm also worried he won't "perform" on the day. He talks more at home than he does when out and can be shy around new people.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2girls1boyplus1 View Post
    Wouldn't you prefer to rule it out properly, even if you doubt it?
    Definitely - which is why I followed it up in the first place. But I have always questioned the need and now I am probably more reluctant because his talking is improving out of sight and I have a newborn and am running on 5-6 hours sleep a night. Which probably makes me sound like a terrible mother who can't be bothered to investigate it, but I can't help that I feel it will be a long and tiring day for nothing!.......Geez, when put down in black and white like that, it really does sound bad.

    OK, so what can I expect from the appt? What sort of things will they do? How involved will I need to be? I ask that because DD doesn't really sleep during the day unless she is on me or DH, so need to figure out if DH needs to be there so that she's happy, or if the Paed will do everything with DS as having her cry in the pram for an hour isn't an option!

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    My ds#1 is super loving (probably over the top) even now at 7 all he wants to do is sit on me and cuddle, and says he loves me about a million times a day, so that unable to feel such emotions is def on the very severe end of it as well.

    Hehas speech issues, he fooled daycare and speechy for 3 years before i finally started mentioning other little quirks andnthey all perked their ears up and said get an assessment.

    He doesnt line his toys up, but he doesnt know how to play with any toy that doesnt have a purpose if that makes sense. Aimal figureines ; a neuro typical child might make them walk, make the noise they make etc. Ds just sits there grouping them by colours.

    No two asd kids are the same tho!

    From what you say, i doubt there is cause for concern, and he still is only quite young. My ds#2 was dx with classic autism at 2yrs 5 months, so it can be dx early. But like a pp said, not always common, and i guess i was taken seriously straight away this time due to already having a child with autism.

    The appt should just be having a chat with you, and the paed talking to your little guy... With both of mine, it was me going in there and saying why i was concerned. Him looking at our letters from speechy who voiced her concerns. Then he gave us referal for psych and ot. We got assessments from psych, speech, and OT. Then went back, he reviewed everything and made a formal dx.

    I doubt you will make it that far tho

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    get it checked out, it could be anything but in the off chance it is autism early intervention is key.

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