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  1. #1
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    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    Default What should a child know before they start prep?

    DS will be starting prep next year and I want to make sure we spend the next 9 months or so ensuring he's as ready as he can be for prep but I'm not sure what a child needs to know/be able to do before prep.

    He has a speech delay but we're working on that with speech therapy and he has improved enormously but I think the delay has affected his comprehension of the world.

    Does he need to understand things like time, hours, mins etc? He wears shoes that do up with velcro but I'm wondering if he will need to do laces? (state school uniform) He doesn't understand things like yesterday, last week, tomorrow etc. Should he?

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    Personally I think its all very basic.

    How to recognise his written name.
    colours
    basic shape, number, letter...but if not its no biggie.

    i find grouping is good...a farm animal, a jungle animal...

    how to open lunch box and lunch packets/drink bottle.

    follow more than one order..so go into your room and put your shoes on your bed.

    the rest will all come with time..

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    our dd's teacher says they expect nothing, so anything the child know is a bonus lol.
    For our next one i will be practicing social skills mostly (Asperger's chid), plus familiarizing him with where everything is and what to do if he is worried or anxious. And obviously toileting, hand washing, dressing etc are all vital skills.
    We are pretty cruisy as far as academic stuff goes, they pick it up fairly quickly and if they have been read to forever then they are usually ok.

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    bellalika is offline I'm trying my hardest, please don't ask for more.
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    My ideal preps (clearly not all) know how to:
    Put their own shoes on and off (velcro or pull ons)
    Take jumper on and off (with zipper help)
    Other basic self help skills
    Recognise their own name
    Basic scissors skills
    Opening of lunchbox etc
    Basic social skills / resilience etc.

    Everything else is pretty much "learn on the job" so to speak.

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    Prep as in preschool or 1st year of "big" school. Here in NSW prep would be 4 year olds the year before school officially starts but I know it's different in other states.

    I agree with everything already said. Also to add to the basics, things like being able to take himself to the toilet, wipe properly and do up his pants is pretty essential. Having a grasp on taking turns and being able to communicate if he has a need - toilet, drink, someone pinching him - stuff like that. Knowing his full name and where he lives, your phone number is something I think is pretty important once kids start school. Also being able to listen and follow directions and sit with his legs crossed, these will get better once he starts but working on that sort of thing a little bit will be appreciated by his teacher!

    Writing etc will come at school and if he's wearing velcro shoes I wouldnt be too stressed about teaching him to tie laces, it certainly wouldn't hurt but not essential IMO. You can teach that later.

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    Agree with bella. Plus toileting too. Coop was able to toilet but i found he was holding it in most of the day as he wasnt quite 100% able to pull his shorts up properly. After talking to his teacher/aide, he is now fine and able to do it himself so no need to wait til he got home.

    I wish i was put more effort into letter recognition though. After this week i am extremely over the letter A and wish i never had to see another one again.

    He learnt how to write and recognise his name in term 1 but even though he knows how to write and recognise, he doesnt know the letters.

    He basically started with the bare bare minimum knowledge but is plodding along ok considering he is one of the youngest preppies this year.

    Sent from my GT-I9000T using BubHub

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    How to use the toilet, wash hands and adjust clothing without assistance.

    How to open lunch box, drink bottles and replace them in own bag.

    How to recognise their name on labels so they can identify their belongings.

    How to ask for help, get a teachers assistance in the playground.

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    What I considered basics {but this is by no means what you HAVE to do, only what I did} is:

    * Can tie shoelaces
    * Can count to 100 and write the numbers
    * Can count by fives and tens.
    * Can add and subtract basic numbers { 2 + 2, 4-1, etc}
    * Can read and print own name in both upper and lower case
    * Can read, recite and print alphabet in upper and lower case.
    * Can read and write basic words like 'because', 'can', 'to', 'if', 'going', etc.
    * Can follow basic multiple directions like "Go get your bag, choose a book and sit at the table"
    * Can take self to toilet, unbutton/unzip pants, flush and wash hands without help
    * As well as random basic knowledge like where do eggs come from, the names of the planets, colour and shape names, things like that.

    Of course don't expect too much, half of the kids in DD's class have to wear stickers with their names on it so they can match the name on themselves with the name on their desks, bags and books.
    Remember that most parents leave that pesky knowledge business to the teachers, so anything you teach on top of "nothing at all" gives a slight edge to their school years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bellalika View Post
    My ideal preps (clearly not all) know how to:
    Put their own shoes on and off (velcro or pull ons)
    Take jumper on and off (with zipper help)
    Other basic self help skills
    Recognise their own name
    Basic scissors skills
    Opening of lunchbox etc
    Basic social skills / resilience etc.

    Everything else is pretty much "learn on the job" so to speak.
    I'm just quoting this again!
    Prep/pre primary/kindy differ from state to state but this is a useful guide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToughLove View Post
    What I considered basics {but this is by no means what you HAVE to do, only what I did} is:

    * Can tie shoelaces
    * Can count to 100 and write the numbers
    * Can count by fives and tens.
    * Can add and subtract basic numbers { 2 + 2, 4-1, etc}
    * Can read and print own name in both upper and lower case
    * Can read, recite and print alphabet in upper and lower case.
    * Can read and write basic words like 'because', 'can', 'to', 'if', 'going', etc.
    * Can follow basic multiple directions like "Go get your bag, choose a book and sit at the table"
    * Can take self to toilet, unbutton/unzip pants, flush and wash hands without help
    * As well as random basic knowledge like where do eggs come from, the names of the planets, colour and shape names, things like that.

    Of course don't expect too much, half of the kids in DD's class have to wear stickers with their names on it so they can match the name on themselves with the name on their desks, bags and books.
    Remember that most parents leave that pesky knowledge business to the teachers, so anything you teach on top of "nothing at all" gives a slight edge to their school years.
    Wow! If I'd had your child in my Prep class, I'd have been out of a job!!! That's great that your daughter knew all that stuff going into Prep, but I certainly wouldn't expect children coming into my class to know anywhere near all that. Well done!
    I certainly think it's advantageous if your child can recognize their name, knows colours and shapes and things like how to open their lunch box, put on and take off their school jumper and do up their shoes (Velcro, not laces). We'll do the rest!


 

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