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  1. #1
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    Default Parents of school aged kids

    Please tell me how you taught your children how to recognise letter? We were given readers to do on letters and the first one we are doing is 'A'.

    Its doing my head in. We spend about 2mins per page(4 pages) and he cant remember what an A looks like.

    I can see myself gettig frustrated as he is only guessing it and its always a H or a P and he doesnt even know what those letters look like but he can write a P as its in his name.

    We have also been given a list of letters he must recognise and know the sounds of before he can move onto new letters. Think there are 8 of them but inhavent even started on those yet because i feel like there is no point to it as of yet as he is having so much trouble with the letter A.

    Please help me.

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    I wrote the letter A out about 10 times, each one on a big A4 piece of paper and stuck them all over my house, everywhere I knew her eyes would regularly fall on....the TV, fridge, bathroom mirror etc.

    Whenever we were in that room i'd point to it and she had to say the letter, the sound and give me an example of a word that began with that letter. I made it into a game that she wasn't allowed to say the same word more than once. She found it so funny and came up with some crazy made up words but that probably did start with the letter A if you spelt them lol.


    We would work on one a night. On tuesday I would write the next letter out on my pieces of A4 and pin them up next to Mondays letter. Then when saying the leter and giving me a word, she had to do both A and B. Wednesday we did C and so on...

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    Just wanted to give a sympathetic hug
    I have found that teaching kids to do things that we find sooo incredibly simple can be sooooo incredibly frustrating! We know its not their fault but OMG its frustrating when on the inside you're screaming "A CAT SAYS ****** MEOW!!! WE JUST WENT THROUGH THIS! THE CAT SAYS MEOW NOT WOOF!!!!" Lol (example changed to prove a point on other basic learning curves)

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    We have been doing the letter A for over half hour yet its a bloody H or P.

    MM i am getting a computer through centrelink. Will hopefully have it by middle of may so we can then do some reading eggs. On thursday i am buying a board from the newsagent which is like a white board that we can use to practise letters on.

    Its seriously like its not getting through to him. He sings the song ants on an apple or however it goes but thats it, all he has taken in from school and he has done the letter A.

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    C has an alphabet placemat that she uses at breakfast and dinner time.

    we play a game of finding the letters while we're at the dining table.

    she also has a set of dora alphabet flash cards.

    seems to help her recognise letters

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    Dh found an abc game he downloaded onto the iPad for ds. It pronounces and displays a letter then you have to find it on the keyboard etc. ds is 4 and at kindy he was taught to recognize and learn the letters in his own name and he's just progressed from there.

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    Don't stress too much. The more the force it the less he'll remember. I know the fact that he's been given 'homework' to learn the letters makes it feel like he HAS to learn it instantly, but it just may take time. Usually it takes weeks or more to learn something especially like letters.

    If he gets frustrated or upset then please stop. He will learn best when he's having fun. I like the suggestion of having an 'A' day, but maybe he needs an 'A' week. I found with my ds some letters were so much easier than others.

    Apart from putting letters on A4 paper around the house, here are a few other suggestions:
    1. Make an A on a piece of toast with vegemite using a knife & present it to him saying "Look it's an A!" and sound excited.
    2. Make an A out of his toys on the floor (eg. toy cars) or use blankets/sheets rolled up to make the shape on the lounge floor
    3. Find signs at his level (eg. names of a park) and ask him to point to the letter 'A' if he can find one. Don't get upset if he can't, give him only a short time to find one, and if he can't find it, point it out and say 'look, here it is, oh and here's another one ...', etc. The next time you go he might point it out himself.
    4. Once he's recognising letters a bit better you could give him a page of his favourite book to look at & find a letter. You could even time him, or ask him to find 3 of the letter you want.
    5. Draw an 'A' on a piece of paper with a texta and then provide him with little bits (eg. 1 - 2cm square) of coloured paper (or newspaper, or cut up junk mail) & a glue stick and get him to stick the paper over the letter outline (you need to draw it reasonably big).

    Remember he'll be doing things at school too to reinforce the learning and it will get easier. As I mentioned earlier some letters came a lot easier than others for my ds and getting an 'A' and an 'H' mixed up is not a major issue, I'd say it's pretty common.

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    All good suggestions above. You could also try writing out a P and a H and an A and ask him if he can see the differences between the letters. Once he really notices how they are different from each other it will be easier to not get them confused. Ask him what an "A" looks like to him. Any shapes that it reminds him of? DD also found it helpful to think of p as having a tail. A can't be P because it has no tail! Capital H has no roof, A has a roof. That must be A, because look it has a roof! That kind of thing.

    Try to make it a bit fun, and don't let him see you get too frustrated (hard as it is). He'll get there.

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    Or you could forget A altogether for the time being and focus on some of the other letters...it may just be that he has a block on just that particular letter.

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    Hmmm
    firstly i would rotate all 8 letters... kinda like "broaden his mind"
    make sure you keep it fun and interesting!
    and writing. writing really helps


 

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