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  1. #11
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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrincessC View Post
    If dd wanted a pink globe I'd get it and if she wanted a blue globe I get her a blue one instead.
    But the Earth is blue. It's an educational toy, it makes sense to buy it in blue. Buying a globe in pink just makes no sense .

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    FiveInTheBed  (24-04-2012),Lillynix  (24-04-2012),nicoleE  (24-04-2012),Witwicky  (24-04-2012)

  3. #12
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    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Oh and for the record, I HATE pink. Always have. I was considered a 'tomboy' growing up because I liked toys which were aimed at boys and I hated pink. It's ridiculous that I actually had a label because I disliked the standard girls things.

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    Agree about the globe, that's just absurd.

    The problem is we're limiting our children's creativity by teaching them that they can or cannot play with certain things because they are "for girls" or "for boys".

    Marketing influences children hugely, my DS is [thankfully] able to think for himself and chooses that yes, he DOES like pink but he still refuses to wear, play with or do certain things at school because he knows the other kids will laugh. Kids don't come up with these insults and this behaviour on their own, they learn it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opinionated View Post
    I hate pink too. Unfortunately, if you have a girl, it is hard to escape. I wish more toys and clothing were in primary colours. Why do we even need seperate sections in stores for boys clothing/toys and girls clothing/toys?
    The toy thing REALLY gets me. I will actually boycott stores that do it. I still remember being told lego was a boys toy when I was a kid

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    Look I'm a total lover of little baby girls in pink and little baby boys in blue and these colours dominated 90% of their wardrobe until they were old enough to state their preferences. DD1 loved pink....everything was pink and she suits pink. Now she says pink isn't her favourite colour anymore and allows some other colours in to her wardrobe but when you take her shopping she still picks pink clothes the majority of the time - but for all her love of pink her favourite toy is lego and she is very creative. She'll rarely pick up a doll to play with and she wants to be a builder when she grows up.

    DD2 - loves, blue, green, yellow, orange and is accepting of some pinks but she's very fussy. Her favourite toys are home stuff - ironing board, tea set, cooking equipment and her baby doll that she looks after better than I look after them sometimes (joking of course) but all of these things are blue, even her doll is a boy and he has a penis. The pink things that she 'allows' in to her toys are Strawberry Shortcake things, she loves strawberry shortcake! She also loves disney princesses thanks to a freind from pre-school last year which I refuse to indulge in and just hope that she forgets about it over time....
    DS is too little yet to have a preference for his clothes and his toys were pretty well all unisex when he was a baby but now he loves his cars, trucks, trains and helicopters.
    Despite me constantly telling my kids that there are no boys and girls colours or toys I still hear my girls mentioning things that makes me realise just how much they are being influenced by others and that they are being drawn in to this 'boys' and 'girls' world.

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    I honestly don't understand this debate (not dismissing it or anything) But I have no problem with my boys owning "boy" clothes and toys and I wouldn't have a problem with a hypothetical daughter having pink clothes and toys -BUT i also have no problem with my boys wearing or having pink or girly items, I paint DS1's nails all the time, he is always asking me to reapaint them different colours, I also let them muck around with my makeup too.

    I think that parents influence more then marketing, we never skip the "girls" aisle at the toy shops or tell the kids sorry you can't have that because it is for a girl. We don't go to the girls clothing aisles, because they are for girls, they are mostly dresses skirts, bikinis etc. Girls and Boys aren't the same they have completely different bodies and hormones/testosterone. I don't know why so many people focus on trying to make them the same. If your and open parent who doesn't mind their sons/daughters wearing or playing with items designed for the oppposite sex, then I don't see the big deal? Marketers with always do what brings in $$

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milktini View Post
    If your and open parent who doesn't mind their sons/daughters wearing or playing with items designed for the oppposite sex, then I don't see the big deal? Marketers with always do what brings in $$
    Because as the mother of a son who does preference pink and wearing fairy costumes, society tells him that this is wrong. Therefore other people tell him it's wrong by making rude comments/snide remarks/stares/gestures.

    Society needs to change and one way for that to happen is for marketing to change.


    *I can haz typos*

  11. #18
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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lillynix View Post
    Because as the mother of a son who does preference pink and wearing fairy costumes, society tells him that this is wrong. Therefore other people tell him it's wrong by making rude comments/snide remarks/stares/gestures.

    Society needs to change and one way for that to happen is for marketing to change.


    *I can haz typos*


    DS2 has an extensive collection of fairy costumes. We don't let the children wear any costumes in public (because they're expensive and they get ruined!) but I'm pretty sure that he wouldn't anyway. Despite us being very supportive of his choices, he still feels cautious about what others think. He shares his interests at school to an extent, but has been laughed at in the past. The teacher intervenes but the damage is done. It is heartbreaking to think that his perfectly legitimate (and often incredibly tasteful!) choices could be squashed down into a stupid little labelled box.

    I think it's all ok though... he has a pretty defiant spirit, and I'm confident that his love of ballet, sewing and Barbie is too strong to be quelled by a few small-minded brats.

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    Marketing like that does not work on my child. She has such a range of clothing, some aimed at boys and some aimed at girls. Her toys are everything from dinosaurs to dolls to trains to pink fluffy animals. Some days she spends ages on her hair, other days I quickly run a brush through it before school.

    Other marketing works on her. We just have to buy the boxed set of The Sullivans ("you can't buy it in shops mum") and we NEED that vacuum cleaner that moves around corners and automatically adjusts with different floor surfaces

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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    I'm a bit baffled on what clothing, toys etc has to do with hormones and last time I checked most little kids were pretty pretty much the same shape Either way I am also confused at why anyone makes their child be anything but themselves, whether that be encouraging pink for girls or boys. Surely letting them be themselves and develop naturally without society judging them for being the way they are is in their best interest?
    I agree, I see children as children, but they grow into men and women, which are completely different.

    I guess in my ownpersonal experience I have never experienced my boys being judged because they wear nailpolish or because they chose pink and purple folders for the daycare portfolios. I have honestly never had someone directly tell me that I shouldn't let my boy play with dolls or experiment with makeup and nail polish, and i they did, I would pretty much tell them to mind their business, not stop my kids doing things they enjoy because it doesn't fit in with society. I do understand that the general opinion of society is that blue is for boys and pink is for girls, dolls are for girls and trucks are for boys, and my point is pretty much that children should be encouraged to expess themselves, either with boy or girl specified items.

    But, being a mum of boys I did decorate their nursey blue with cars, I have brought them cars and trucks for their birthdays, I do buy them boyish clothes, I don't see the problem with this, isn't this what most parents do? I don't know any other parents that set up a pink nursery for their son etc. So aren't we(parents) setting our children up from a young age as to what is boyish and what is girlish?

    I think what i'm trying to say, just isn't really getting across (i suck at wording) But I don't think it's a new problem that has just come on because of marketing, it's been a problem for a long time, I actually find society today wayy more accepting then older generations.


 

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