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  1. #111
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    Thanks everyone for your replies so far, it's really interesting to see both sides of the coin. And, as I said earlier, I have never taught (nor had aspirations to teach) in the private sector, so my impressions and thoughts on private schooling are heavily influenced by anecdotes and gossip from others

    Hannahsmum, I would definitely be investigating your DD1's school and pushing them to give you a definitive answer as to why they will not accept DD2. Louellyn is a lawyer, and so I'd be very inclined to believe her when she says that if challenged, the school would have to prove that by accepting your daughter, it would cost them to update/integrate facilities that they currently to not have, or have access to.

    I feel I should also point out at this juncture, that all my experiences of teaching are based on what most would define as not just a small school, but a tiny school! We have a whole school population of around 43, made up of 26 families. We have 3 grades (P/1, 2/3/4, 4/5/6) and we have 4 teachers (2 part-time) a principal (and my apologies to come off snobby, but the headmaster/mistress of a school is spelt principal, not principle ) and 2 teaching aides. We also have access to a visiting library and art van on rotating fortnights. All students from grade 2 up have their own laptop, and grade sizes are usually around the 12-13 mark (although I have 18 this year.)
    Now, on paper, that makes my school look really good. But to visit our school, you would see lots of kids in half uniform and some who disregard it altogether. (We're just happy they show up most of the time... absenteeism is an issue with a few families) You would see a very large grounds, beautifully kept, a large undercover playground, plenty of asphelt (sp?) a large outdoor learning area and several sheds. The school buildings themselves have grown from the original, built in 1920 or so, and so as you can image, they are not all high-tech.. it does keep a constant ****** of money to keep them safe and useable.
    We have IWB's in every classroom, and families are only responsible to pay school fees and camp fees. (last year 5/6's went to Melbourne to experience city life for a week.. this year we are going to Sovereign Hill to experience life during the gold rush- pretty impressive camps) The school pays for ALL stationary, including 6 different books, 2 text books, all pens, pencils, texta's etc. The school also pays for programs like Intrepica, Mathletics and Reading Eggs (which I am aware other schools make families pay for.)
    Our staff is made up of one leading teacher about to retire (but I stress in no way has given up her love of the profession, she is still an inspiration to me and such an innovative thinker), a young go-getter who is working wonders with the grade 1's when I struggled with them as preps last year (just not my forte- we all now know I LOVE my upper school kids!) and myself, who- if I am not at home with my own children, I am at school planning, prepping, assessing or reporting.

    There are many locals who STILL send their children 20 minutes away on a bus to the private school... and I guess I just don't get why? Why, after everything we can offer, are we still seen as inferior? *shrug* It's no big deal I guess.. I'm just trying to understand what people think of public/private etc.


    (apologies for my waffling of late And my spelling- my keyboard is missing about 5 keys- thanks children )

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    Well I can say that I'd love to send my kids to your school!
    However, 14 or so kids per class and all the extras you mentioned just isn't the reality for most public schools . 25-30 kids a class with a school of 700 kids is the reality around here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pina Colada View Post
    This. In my experience it is very rarely the teachers in public schools that people take issue with. It is the behaviour of a such a large portion of the students and the blatant disregard of the parents that make it intolerable. And even then, it is on a school by school basis I think.
    This! It's not the school or teachers that I don't like about or local public.. It's the families of the kids who go there.. I live in a poor area with alot of drugs.. Needless to say a large quantity of the kids at the local public schools have issues.. Lots of issues.

    We chose a private school for my son not because it's private.. I couldnt care less.. But because it's in a once area with lots of areas for us to live, great campus, great religious aspects and it's tiny.. Only 600 kids p-12! That's why we chose it :-) If the local public schools had all the same features we'd have sent him there instead.

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***

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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy2be3 View Post
    This! It's not the school or teachers that I don't like about or local public.. It's the families of the kids who go there.. I live in a poor area with alot of drugs.. Needless to say a large quantity of the kids at the local public schools have issues.. Lots of issues.

    We chose a private school for my son not because it's private.. I couldnt care less.. But because it's in a once area with lots of areas for us to live, great campus, great religious aspects and it's tiny.. Only 600 kids p-12! That's why we chose it :-) If the local public schools had all the same features we'd have sent him there instead.

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***
    My situation is similar to this Public school across the street, with massive classes/lots of behaviour, drug, underage drinking etc....... Went with a Catholic school 5 minutes away that has small class sizes and a more respectful group of students and parents.....

    Not to say that public schools are inferior ( we actually attempted to get DD into one of our local public schools, but couldn't get in as we fell outside the catchment ),......

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I know you were only referring to the schools you teach in pink, but our public school has small class sizes. DD hasn't has a class size over 20 yet and our principle is very creative with our funding so we have a permanent cap of 15 each class for kinder, so we have several kinders. Maybe it's bc we live rurally? but then until the last few years when there has been a migration from the catholic to our school, their class sizes were around 28.

    So I don't think there's any hard and fast rules to say public means big classes.
    I've shown you the website for DS' public school, we're fairly central in SA. It has a pool, new hall,interactive boards, brand new computers one per student in computing class, it's a climate change school so they learn about how to care for their environment and have vege patches that they care for.

    On sports day whenever a child had a fall in the running races, the children surrounding would stop to help them up rather than continue running to win the race.

    I have seen the difference between his school and the other schools in our area, public and private. His is the best for DS by a long shot.

    His class sizes are very small. Last year he had 11 other students in his reception class, I can't remember how many is in his current class but it would be well under 20.

    We hit pot luck.


 

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