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  1. #11
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Hello dear

    My sons have mixed receptive expressive language disorder.

    Ill dive into that, but before i do, a pp said that if a child makes attempts to communicate its not likely autism... This is simply not true, my ds#1 pointed, grunted, and and made attempts to mimic the syllables. He has autism. (they both do)

    In my experience op, there is definitely light at the end of the tunnel.

    Ill talk about ds#1 as his language probs are more severe..

    Ds#1 was non verbal until 3yrs, then spent a year of babbling and not making sense. We started speech therapy at 4, he started school at 5, able to talk.

    Now, we of course still have our challenges, his sequencing gets muddled up so he doesnt always make sense, he gets words confused with others, and his comprehension is all over the shop (but thats the receptive language disorder amongst other things) but he talks! And his teachers at school are always surprised when they read his speech reports because he does so well.

    We do speech fortnightly per child, and around 1 hours of speech activities per child a day. If u put in the work, u will get the results

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    Happy2be3  (17-04-2012)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy2be3 View Post
    My tip.. Sign language! Teach him some signs.. Things like yes, no, milk, drink, eat, potty, boy, girl, mum, dad, fun, ball, tree etc, etc. My son has dyspraxia, stuttering and expressive issues and has been in public speech therapy at north lakes since he was 12 months old. What your therapist says sounds pretty spot on to me.. At 2 they usually keep tabs monthly and give you tips on how to encourage speech (Wait, don't interrupt child, give them lots of silence after asking a question to encourage them to fill that silence, pay a real interest in what THEY are interested in at that moment.. They are much more likely to interact with you if you're showing interest!) It is good that they are seeing him once a month :-) But like I said, I would definitely do sign to help with frustration on yours and his part and contrary to some ppl beliefs sign actually encourages speech!

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***
    My son was just like yours at that age.
    All these things helped us. Now he is nearly four and has almost caught up with his classmates. I hope that helps
    Last edited by LoveLivesHere; 17-04-2012 at 20:55.

  4. #13
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    My DS has also been diagnosed with expressive and receptive speech delay (one's 14th percentile and one is 19th percentile but I can't remember which is which at the moment). He has been seeing a speech therapist since he was 3 and it has helped enormously. He is now seeing both a private and a public speech therapist.

    It's absolutely heartbreaking when all the other children are talking and telling their parents about their day at childcare and your child just doesn't speak Had I known then what I know now I would have intervened earlier than 3 years.

    It is really hard when they don't speak. People will talk to them and ask them their name and they don't say anything and you have to explain he's a bit behind in his speech otherwise they think he's rude or very shy. DS couldn't participate in many games at Childcare because he didn't speak For his fourth bithday I asked one of his carers who he played with the most so I knew who to invite for his birthday party.

    It is getting easier though. PM me if you want any more information or want to discuss further.

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    He is 4 and a half.. He is understood by close family and friends when he speaks in context.. He speaks in short sentences.. But my son's speech disorder is more than likely completely different to your sons.. Speech is so complex. It is still very hard to hear children half his age chatting away and the difference in my son's speech to those in his kindy class is unmistakable! I have been googleing, reading, studying anything and everything since he was 12 months. My other but of advise would be, follow professional advice but do not wait for them to tell you every little thing... Research things you can do, read up about speech delays and be your child's advocate :-) In Australia with public speech therapy most the therapy is done at home.. By you the parent.

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***
    Last edited by Happy2be3; 17-04-2012 at 21:21.

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    Quote Originally Posted by heeeeerekittykitty View Post
    Happy2b3- thank you so much for your advice , and I have heard about sign language it seems great , I am going to google more about it now ! How old is your son now and how is he's speech ? I hope he's flourishing and doing well :-) in most sessions me and the SP have discussed the Hanen course and she has also given me lots of information to take home regarding it , she seems pretty happy with the things I'm doing at home with him so far .

    MsMummy- thank you to you also for your post and advice . Your right , it is tough and makes you very sad for them when they are lagging behind . Was your son talking at all at 2 ? How is he's speech now ?

    Thanks so much and sorry for all the questions . Xxoo
    At 2, my son was only saying about 4 or 5 words, so similar to your son.

    Even though I think my son is going to be okay now in regards to language, I still get pangs of sadness and envy when I hear 2yos chatting away so easily.

    My son still appears delayed to other people, as he is introverted and doesn't really talk to people he doesn't know much.

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    You know what I find the most heart renching? When someone asks your child a question "are you having fun today? " for eg.. And I can see my son is processing the question and then formating an answer and trying SO so so hard to get the words out but because he takes on average 20 seconds.. The person moves on, and doesn't wait for his answer. It is THE hardest most upsetting thing!

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***

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    spitthedummy  (18-04-2012)

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    Sign language is a great idea. It will help ease frustration on both sides, even if it's only a few words, it will help you both gain confidence. I have an iphone app called Baby Sign & Learn. It costs $1.99 for the Auslan (Australian sign language) add-on and it's pretty useless without it, but with the add-on it's good. My ds loves it (he's 5.5) and we're both starting to do the signs to teach my dd.

    My ds had ear issues (grommets at 15 months) and I did a bit of babysign with him and it really helped for the phase when he had only a handful of words he could say, but much more up in his head wanting to come out. Having said that I don't know if the speech delay might extend to a difficulty with sign language, but I'd say it's worth a try ... but it is hard work and LOTS of repetition until you expect the child to sign back (as in, sign EVERY time you say the word for weeks on end - at least - before expecting a sign in return). The hard work is why I stopped with only 4 or 5 signs for my ds. I'm hoping my ds ironically will help me teach my dd more signs than that. We've started with hello, bye and milk at this stage.

    My brother had a receptive language delay or similar. His exact diagnosis is hard to remember, sorry. He wasn't actually diagnosed til year 7! Eventhough he was seeing a paed pre-school as he was a sick newborn and 6 weeks prem, they dismissed his language issues as being normal, when they actually weren't. Despite his very late diagnosis and lots of damage done by then (he really struggled in primary school), he ended up doing very well. He finished school, went onto Uni and is now in a high-paid, prestige job that involves lots of overseas travel. He's done very well and you wouldn't know he had a 'diagnosis' of 'learning issues' when he was at school.

    My nephew was an early babbler, but had very difficult to understand speech, with few words for a long time. He's now 5 and even at the start of last year (at age almost 4) I had a lot of trouble understanding many words that he said at all. Even without speech therapy (long story) he's SO different now and I can understand nearly everything he says and he says A LOT! He's doing well at Kinder and will be fine at school next year.

    Your ds is already seeing a speech therapist and that's a huge advantage. You'll see massive improvement with time, but I do very much understand how it's hard to be patient in the face of this type of challenge.

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    spitthedummy  (18-04-2012)

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    I could have written that myself op... my son is 2.5 and has said about 28 words, not very clearly and he only uses about 4 words regularly. It absolutely breaks my heart. . I don't think your post was silly or that your over reacting, I umderstand completly where urge coming from. We see a speech therapist every momth and also a occupational therapist as he has sensory processing disorder also, our Otis memtioned to me last session. That I should discuss with our pead about him possibly being on the autism spectrum, he points at things and communicates to me things he wants. It scares the shat out of me when I think about what his future holds for him. .. sorry for ramblimg. . ETA I have a new phone and clearly can't use the keyboard on it yet haha

    Sent from my T3020 using BubHub

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    heeeeerekittykitty is offline My babies, my cats ....ahhhh , bliss !!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy2be3 View Post
    You know what I find the most heart renching? When someone asks your child a question "are you having fun today? " for eg.. And I can see my son is processing the question and then formating an answer and trying SO so so hard to get the words out but because he takes on average 20 seconds.. The person moves on, and doesn't wait for his answer. It is THE hardest most upsetting thing!

    ***Happy to be a Mummy & Daddy of ONE! :-) ***
    Reading that broke my heart for your son :-( * sob* I don't blame you for finding that so heart wrenching . to see them trying so hard :-( I'd feel like screaming at the person COME BACK AND WAIT FOR HES ANSWER!!!!!!!!

    Thank you to you and MsMummy for answering my questions , and to DE and Loving6, a HUGE thank you also. You have all actually given me some hope that if he is not just a late talker and does infact have a delay or problem of some sort he will eventually talk even if lots of intervention is required . Because I really do sit here envisioning him at ten years old still not uttering a word . I'm such a worry wart.

    Your all wonderful , thank you .

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    One thing we do at school for speech development is language experiences. This is that we do say playing with playdoh (a multi sensory experience is best) and then do a lot of talk surrounding this experience. We repeat key words over and over. Rephrasing numerous times. So if we r focusing on 'giving' as a word or 'passing' as a word we use this over and over again. So please pass mummy the red cutter, thanks for passing mummy the cutter, when you pass mummy the cutter it saves me from leaning over. Just a example. You might choose words like drink, eat shoes first.

    Never ever believe there is no hope or you have failed your child. Every single sound is one sound closet to whole words. Reinforce those sounds.

    I also encourage Auslan together with speech. You can learn the signs from their website. They r so easy they give a little mpg demonstration.

    I am not convinced that monthly speech is enough. Please get another opinion. Have you seen your GP about this. There might be so many agencies that you could access help through and ate unaware of. I take it he has had an auditory assessment? no glue ear, gromit/adenoid problems?


 

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