+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    372
    Thanks
    66
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0

    Default Wooden floorboards Vs Carpets

    Hi there
    We would like to get some wooden floorboards (the floating type) and i'm just wondering if anyone can share their experiences with this type of flooring - good and/or bad experiences.

    Also, would it be best to put new carpet down first, or do the floating floorbaords first?? like, which is best to get done first? We'll be replacing old carpet with new. and we currently have tiles where we'd be putting the floating floorboards.

    TIA!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    716
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked
    131
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Our house had tiles in the kitchen and dining and carpet throughout when we bought it. We got it all ripped up and replaced with floating floors. Love it!!

    Messes are so easy to clean. I have 2 indoor cats so it's really easy to get all their fur.

    If your house is 2 storey one tip I'd say is walk around and put screws between all the squeaky floorboards. Our house made all sorts of squeaky sounds when we first moved in but none now

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Mrs E For This Useful Post:

    noopy  (13-04-2012)

  4. #3
    Buttoneska's Avatar
    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,677
    Thanks
    2,066
    Thanked
    1,981
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    get a decent quality floating floor that has a good thickness vaneer on top (they are mostly mdf with a think slice of wood on top) The most expensive ones have a thickness that can be sanded twice. The poor quality ones it is impossible to sand so any scratches, dints etc cannot be fixed. Also get something that is a stong timber - floating floors dint quite easily but if you get a harder type of timber they will last longer.

    Hubby laid some floating floors for a friend who had brought really cheap ones - they are so thin they buckle in the heat and cold, sh spilt a bit of water on them and they puffed up like a tampoon (dh had to pull those ones up and relay them). The look really nasty too. I think they were around $30 a square mtr.

    My dad has got really high quality ones that cost more then real floorboards - you can sand them 2 or 3 times and they haven't dinted or scratched and he has dogs inside. They were over $80 a square mtr which i think is abit over the top.

    Just a decent middle to upper range should do the job and last. It costs a bit to lay them (if you get a chippy), there is not point paying for a professional to lay them and then using such poor quality iykwim.

    I just asked DH - he says doing the floating floor first. If you are not ripping the tiles up - there will be a step up between the carport and the floating floor he says - it won't be seamless which isn't bad, but just so you know?

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Buttoneska For This Useful Post:

    noopy  (13-04-2012)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    716
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked
    131
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Another tip. The dude that layed ours showed me how to fix dents. In bunnings in the craft section they sell bees wax. Get a lighter on the end and drip however many drops you need in to the dent. Then a razor blade is slid gently across the top to chop off the excess. Works great!

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Mrs E For This Useful Post:

    noopy  (13-04-2012)

  8. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    268
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked
    53
    Reviews
    0
    Bamboo is a great option, very hard wearing! Can't remember how much I paid but it wasn't cheap and when we got flooded they were fine. We did our carpets first as they were in the bedrooms and I didn't have to have workman traipsing around on new floorboards and dragging carpet rolls over the top.

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    372
    Thanks
    66
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Buttoneska View Post
    spilt a bit of water on them and they puffed up like a tampoon
    HAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHA hilarious!!!!!
    i must remember that one...

    Thanks everyone for your feedback.
    but.... one has said lay floating floor first, the other said they did the carpet.
    bit confused now!!! haha (can be easily done cos i'm 6 months preg!!!!)

    the wooden floor we were kinda looking at is around 1.8cm thick i think... is that thick enough, or is it best to go thicker?? also, that will mean there will be a height difference between the floatings and the new carpet... i wonder if this is the way to go or can u put something under the carpet to raise it a little as well????

    Thanks again to everyone to replied!!!

  10. #7
    Buttoneska's Avatar
    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,677
    Thanks
    2,066
    Thanked
    1,981
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    thickness I meant the wood on top, not the total thickness. I think 1.8cm would be the total height wouldn't it? Just ask them how thick the actual timber is on the top. It is glued to the rest of the board if that makes sense - they built the boards the then glue a thin piece of 'proper timber' on top.

    DH said the step up he means that right now the car and the tiles are probably the same height? Both are laid directly on the flooring/slab and probably similar thickness. When you relay the carpet it will be same/similar heigh to what it is now, if you lay floorboard on top of tile it will be the the thickness of the floorboards higher then the carpet (say 20mm or so?) Its not heaps, you can buy those 90degree trims, you probably just can't use the flat trims that join the carpet to the tiles now?

    I have no idea about raising the carpet? Can you possibly buy a thicker underlay? Other option is to rip up tiles, but thats messy work. A step up isn't bad, its just a little lip (just have to make sure lil ones don't stumb their toes)

  11. #8
    Buttoneska's Avatar
    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,677
    Thanks
    2,066
    Thanked
    1,981
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    as for what to do first - technically you can do either first, DH just suggested the floor boards first because in building in carpet always is the last thing to go in. Floorboards may need triming/tiles cut etc which could create dust. Trademans walking around etc. He suggested letting them using the old carpet to get dirty and then putting hte new carpet down.

    PP is doing other way as bedrooms are seperate to floorboard area I guess??

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    372
    Thanks
    66
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Thank you so much. i think the 90 degree trimming thing u mentioned is the way to go. that should get rid of any uneven surfaces where the carpet and boards meet.
    i guess in our house it doesnt matter which we do first cos you dont have to walk thru any carpet to get to the boards. but you'd have to walk on the boards to get to the carpet!

    Thank again, you've cleared my head!!!!


 

Similar Threads

  1. Floorboards - crawling
    By moosey in forum General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 28-11-2012, 23:06
  2. Floorboards question
    By Miss Salty in forum House & Gardens
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-09-2012, 20:46
  3. When would you install new carpets - kids at what age?
    By mum2one99 in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 23-02-2012, 17:54

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pyjamas.com.au
With so many gorgeous brands and styles for every season, our pyjamas, nighties, robes, sleepsuits and sleeping bags are lovely for lights out and perfect for lazy days. Get 10% off first order using code bubhub. Be quick offer ends 31/12/16.
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
The Fix Program Sydney CBD and Broadway
Pregnancy and women's health physio, pregnancy and new mum Pilates classes taught by our physios for you and bub. Pregnancy back and pelvic pain. Also, we treat postnatal and women of all ages. Incontinence, prolapse, sexual and pelvic pain.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!