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  1. #81
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    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artful View Post
    .

    Blissedout- your idea about cutting money but every child receiving two nutritious meals at school ( across the board) is interesting. Is that what they do in the state schools in the UK? What would you do about those areas where school attendance is really low? In some areas of WA it can be around 60% which means 40%, roughly speaking, on any one day wouldn't get those meals and the family would still have less money.

    its not a bad idea, except the school meals historically the world over have been awful quality. And like you said what about kids who don't go to school? Although maybe this would encourage them to go? I don't knwo much about it, but is unattendance normally because the child doesn't want to know and parents don't enforce, is it parents stopping them going.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander Beetle View Post
    I would hope that's very rare. I don't feel it's a supermarket's role to enforce nutrition in families, especially when they are the ones stocking the garbage. If the junk food us refused, do they then have a qualified nutritionist to point them in the right direction? It's no right of theirs to tell a family what they can eat, even if it's unhealthy. There's currently no laws against junk.
    That's the thing, if they start controlling what type of foods people on the basic card eat, should they only allow them to buy homebrand stuff? Cheap toilet rolls rather than the luxury expensive ones? What about fly spray? Air freshener? Fabric softener?? It's a slippery slope.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ana Gram View Post
    Why don't we just bring back work houses for us poor people? Then the greater community would feel like they are getting their money's worth.
    Some people would love that!

    Seems it doesn't matter if a woman (or man) is married and stays home with children even though their job opportunities would be exactly the same as someone who is single... even though the divorce rate is terrible. I don't see why people want to see single parents - who have the biggest workload of all doing the job of mum + dad - have even MORE on their plate by forcing them back to work!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artful View Post
    your idea about cutting money but every child receiving two nutritious meals at school ( across the board) is interesting. Is that what they do in the state schools in the UK? What would you do about those areas where school attendance is really low? In some areas of WA it can be around 60% which means 40%, roughly speaking, on any one day wouldn't get those meals and the family would still have less money.
    Not sure about the UKs state schools. It's something I've seen suggested in many child poverty studies as a remedy for the issue. Coupled with cooking classes and ingredients to take home as an incentive to attend and then put it into practice. But the primary goal is fed kids.

    Where I grew up the local primary had local businesses supplying 2 meals a day. Their attendance rates increased quite dramatically as a result. They also provided warm clothes to kids without. I agree it's the parents job, but like I said the children of those who can't/won't provide shouldn't be punished as a result. The other upside they found was kids felt more 'at home' at school and as a result some kids disclosed details of abuse at home to the teachers they had strengthened relationships with. Just by showing they cared the kids gained confidence in the teachers.

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to BlissedOut For This Useful Post:

    Artful  (13-04-2012),babyla  (13-04-2012),Buttoneska  (13-04-2012),Stiflers Mom  (13-04-2012)

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    This is getting beyond rediculous, it is downright disgusting the way some people think of single parents. Apparently there is no class system in this country, but single parents on Centrelink (or not, as one poster said anyone who has a child out of a relationship) are second class!

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    Yeah I'll just put my laptop down, stop getting a degree, skip work this afternoon, and hop down to the local community kitchen to earn my keep. Oh if it wasn't so ridiculous I'd weep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    Not sure about the UKs state schools. It's something I've seen suggested in many child poverty studies as a remedy for the issue. Coupled with cooking classes and ingredients to take home as an incentive to attend and then put it into practice. But the primary goal is fed kids.

    Where I grew up the local primary had local businesses supplying 2 meals a day. Their attendance rates increased quite dramatically as a result. They also provided warm clothes to kids without. I agree it's the parents job, but like I said the children of those who can't/won't provide shouldn't be punished as a result. The other upside they found was kids felt more 'at home' at school and as a result some kids disclosed details of abuse at home to the teachers they had strengthened relationships with. Just by showing they cared the kids gained confidence in the teachers.
    I like this. A lot. Part of a schools job is to create a community hub, gardening and cooking clubs would be s fabulous way to engage and connect a community. We take for granted that families know what good nutrition is as though it's something that doesn't need to be taught. It does increase attendance rates and school connectedness. Breakfast clubs do the same thing, a nutritious breakfast is provided and attendance and lateness rates improve dramatically and overnight.

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    Blissed, Artful; Schools in England where I come from have only one meal a day which obviously is lunch. There is no option for a second meal. Some schools do a breakfast club (if you live in the posh parts which my fam don't) but you have to pay a certain amount for that, I think it's like 7 pounds a week, which is a lot to struggling families.
    When I was at school they had mini meals and maxi meals. Mini meals were for families whos lunches were paid for by the government, and usually consisted of a minuscule amount, 2 small potato balls the size of a 50c piece and a slice o thin ham, with a carton of warm milk.

    Maxi meals were for families who paid the 11 pounds a week for their lunches, because there mums and dads worked. They would have for instance, 5 potato balls and 2 slices of ham, semolina pudding and a tall container of milk because they paid extra for more milk.

    I always envied maxi meal kids, sometimes they would get completely different meals to us, we'd have a cardboard fishfinger and an unfrozen smiley face, and they'd have lovely pies and chips with gravy.

    The dinner ladies were openly disgusted at the amount the mini meal kids got, we would have finished eating before we even sat down..and they made us line up separately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GothChick View Post
    Blissed, Artful; Schools in England where I come from have only one meal a day which obviously is lunch. There is no option for a second meal. Some schools do a breakfast club (if you live in the posh parts which my fam don't) but you have to pay a certain amount for that, I think it's like 7 pounds a week, which is a lot to struggling families.
    When I was at school they had mini meals and maxi meals. Mini meals were for families whos lunches were paid for by the government, and usually consisted of a minuscule amount, 2 small potato balls the size of a 50c piece and a slice o thin ham, with a carton of warm milk.

    Maxi meals were for families who paid the 11 pounds a week for their lunches, because there mums and dads worked. They would have for instance, 5 potato balls and 2 slices of ham, semolina pudding and a tall container of milk because they paid extra for more milk.

    I always envied maxi meal kids, sometimes they would get completely different meals to us, we'd have a cardboard fishfinger and an unfrozen smiley face, and they'd have lovely pies and chips with gravy.

    The dinner ladies were openly disgusted at the amount the mini meal kids got, we would have finished eating before we even sat down..and they made us line up separately.
    That is horrible! Some of our schools run a breakfast program, it's open to everyone but aimed at kids who ordinarily would have none.

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    GothChick, that's awful

    This is why I don't like children of poorer parents being treated as second class. How is it fair that if people on benefits are paid their FTB in food vouchers but the wealthy are still paid their CCR/FTB etc in cash? Those paid cash can get beautiful, organic, CHEAPER produce from their local farmers markets and those paid the food vouchers have to shop at Coles/Woolies and spend more for the same (but less quality - prob imported) product. Leaving them with less.

    I do think that if someone is known to DOCS for some kind of extreme negligence against their children, those children need to be removed until mum/dad is better and they are again able to care for them. Mum or dad who is high, passed out on the couch, isn't going to get him/herself up off the couch to wander down to coles to buy their kids some healthy food simply because they've been given a food voucher.

    I don't think parents who aren't feeding their kids should HAVE their children WITH them Why throw a voucher at them? They need psychological help and/or rehab.

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