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  1. #11
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    I'm not a fan of elimination diets. They are a LOT of work and potentially expense too and may or may not work. What happens if they work, when do you reintroduce things or do you keep your child on that diet for life? What happens when they go to a party or a friends house?

    I would aim to avoid as many processed foods as possible and high amounts of food colouring, but the diet you have him on already sounds pretty good. You're getting in some fruit & vegies and at 2.5 that's pretty good. I would read books on behaviour management such as 'The Spirited Child' or 'Raising Boys' because it may be you are expecting different behaviour than is 'normal' for his age. 2.5 year olds are pretty full on and challenging at the best of times.

    I hope this doesn't offend, but I mostly wanted to let you know there are other options rather than completely changing his diet, which if not done carefully could cause nutritional deficits.

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    I was going to try to do it years ago but I didn't do it in the end.

    What I decided to do first was change the bread and make sure I avoided msg. If I stick to that they are pretty good. Bread is a huge one for my girls and they all get very emotional if they have bread with 282 in it or even vinegar as a preservative. When DD1 was 10yrs she swapped half her sandwich with a friends wholemeal salad sandwich and I could tell within 20mins after picking her up from school that she had eaten something that day that I hadn't given her. And the reactions we get from msg are terrible. And interrestingly I recently discovered I react quite badly to msg to the point where I feel like I'm having heart palpitations or my heart is stopping and starting even hours later. So, I make sure there is no chance of msg for any of us now.

    Then I try to avoid as many preservatives etc as I can. But I think there may be another issue with DD2 so I'm going to look into that soon. But I will be doing a food diary and noting down any possible reactions or changes in behaviour and try to do it that way.
    Last edited by Dannielle; 11-04-2012 at 15:33.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mim1 View Post
    I'm not a fan of elimination diets. They are a LOT of work and potentially expense too and may or may not work. What happens if they work, when do you reintroduce things or do you keep your child on that diet for life? What happens when they go to a party or a friends house?

    I would aim to avoid as many processed foods as possible and high amounts of food colouring, but the diet you have him on already sounds pretty good. You're getting in some fruit & vegies and at 2.5 that's pretty good. I would read books on behaviour management such as 'The Spirited Child' or 'Raising Boys' because it may be you are expecting different behaviour than is 'normal' for his age. 2.5 year olds are pretty full on and challenging at the best of times.

    I hope this doesn't offend, but I mostly wanted to let you know there are other options rather than completely changing his diet, which if not done carefully could cause nutritional deficits.
    I totally agree with the books mentioned "Raising your spirited child" was my bible for my now 7yr old and that diet is definitely not the only way to try and bring about changes in behaviour. Failsafe isn't for everyone, for us though, it has been brilliant.

    We researched and subsequently went failsafe for not only behavioural issues (which were bloody awful) but also physical reactions - high sal (many fruits) and high amine foods (bananas for example) would give my girl horrendous thrush and rashes,

    I wouldn't recommend going failsafe without the supervision of a dietician, not only for assistance as to how and when to re introduce/challenge foods but also because you do need to ensure that your kids nutritional needs are being met.

    I also want to address your questions about parties/friends houses and whether the diet is for life. In my experience, my 7 year old has far more tolerance for high sal/amine foods now than when she was 2.5, or even 4 so her diet now incorporates foods that previously would've seen a huge reaction and being older, she has control over what she eats and can make the decision for herself - ie if she wants to go and eat the punnet of strawberries, she can, she knows she'll end up with thrush, but it's her choice. The older our kids get, the more they have to be in control of their choices and diet/food is part of that. As for parties, we've always let them eat whatever they want, it's a party! Same with Easter and Christmas, they're free to knock themselves out and we just deal with the fallout.

  4. #14
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    I just googled 'Failsafe support group' and this thread I had forgotten I'd started years ago popped up!

    Anyway, here I am 18 months later, with a now 4 year old with still the same issues as back then when I started this thread.

    We have seen paediatricians, psychologists, naturopaths and today a dietician. The dietician has suggested the full elimination diet recommended by the RPAH/FedUp folks, but also gluten and lactose free and I'm totally overwhelmed. I already bake from scratch and run an additive free house, but this diet is sooo restrictive, uninteresting, time consuming and stressful. But it's either try this or go straight to the paed who will give me another print out on Clonodine for ADHD/ODD.

    Positive stories for Failsafe anyone? Worth the effort for your ADHD/ODD child? Support please? I bought the Friendly Food recipe book and everything in it is different to what he normally eats, or I don't think he'll eat it at all. And the breakfasts and snacks are so time consuming to cook, it'll add hours of baking to my busy week.

    Whinge over now.

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    It IS difficult and very restrictive. And a LOT of sugar! I did full failsafe myself a few years ago. Since Last oct I've beenfollowing failsafe additive guidelines with dd1 (no sals/amine/glut), she is already wheat and dairy free so full FS would have been too much. Just the additive part alone made a huge change in her attitude. We are now exploring fodmaps because she tested positive (as well as the attitude problems she had gastro symptoms). There are some face book groups for 'beyond failsafe' - gaps and biomedicine I think, to I have never implemented any of that myself. Failsafe is great but it has limitations.

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    It could also be worth looking into deficiencies and heavy metals that could cause some behaviour issues. Check out biobalance.org.au for some info.

    Also, if you have tried everything and it looks like medication for ADHD is going to be necessary. It is not the end of the world. I have seen children struggle at school due to untreated ADHD, the immediate improvement in their learning and ability to cope with the school environment once medicated and even the difference incorrect dosage can make.


 

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