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  1. #1
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    Default Gross motor skills

    When dropping ds1 at kindy this morning the teacher was providing feedback to parents considering its end of term. While I was happy to be told my ds is very well behaved and a pleasure to teach she said his gross motor skills need improvement, painting, drawing and using scissors, he doesn't appear to have alot of strength in his hands. She recommends working on it at home and if by the end of next term see an OT. He is 4 next month. He is very good at kicking and catching the football. Admittedly we have not really given him scissors at home so I understand that side of it but he is always drawing and painting at home. He's also been going to daycare since he was 9mths old so has done plenty there also.

    Would you be concerned just yet and see an OT or would you leave it another term and see if it improves?

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    Painting, drawing and cutting with scissors are all fine motor skills & kicking the ball, running, etc are gross motor skills .

    Would I be worried? Hard to say. My ds was a scribbler at kinder last year (he was 4 in January last year) and painting involved mixing colours on paper and having fun but didn't resemble anything in particular. And the teacher said he had begun to use scissors. The last point was the funniest on his mid-year report because he's been using scissors well since he was 3 at home!

    However, if she thinks he doesn't have strength in his hands that might be of concern. I wouldn't rush to see an OT at this point, but definitely arrange it in a term if things haven't improved.

    So, what to do at home? Don't stress too much, but offer pens/crayons & paper for drawing. Offer scissors and allow for free-hand cutting (don't make him cut around shapes, that isn't needed, let him just 'play with cutting'). Is he playing with Duplo? That will help with his fine motor skills too ... he might find Lego a bit too frustrating at this point. Cardboard puzzles with 18 - 24 pieces would be good too.

    Don't force him to do things. Let him lead the play, but provide the things that improve fine motor control as options frequently. Don't expect clear drawings/painting or good scissor control until a lot closer to 5, but things should show some improvement before that.

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    *nods* they're fine motor skills. I'd suss out whether the strength of his hands is an issue. If the strength seems fine, but he just doesn't seem interested then I wouldn't worry, a lot of boys aren't interested in the typical things that require fine motor skills.
    If it's a strength thing though, then I'd get it looked at.
    Is he interested in playing with matchbox cars or a train set? Those definitely use fine motor skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mim1 View Post
    Painting, drawing and cutting with scissors are all fine motor skills & kicking the ball, running, etc are gross motor skills .

    Would I be worried? Hard to say. My ds was a scribbler at kinder last year (he was 4 in January last year) and painting involved mixing colours on paper and having fun but didn't resemble anything in particular. And the teacher said he had begun to use scissors. The last point was the funniest on his mid-year report because he's been using scissors well since he was 3 at home!

    However, if she thinks he doesn't have strength in his hands that might be of concern. I wouldn't rush to see an OT at this point, but definitely arrange it in a term if things haven't improved.

    So, what to do at home? Don't stress too much, but offer pens/crayons & paper for drawing. Offer scissors and allow for free-hand cutting (don't make him cut around shapes, that isn't needed, let him just 'play with cutting'). Is he playing with Duplo? That will help with his fine motor skills too ... he might find Lego a bit too frustrating at this point. Cardboard puzzles with 18 - 24 pieces would be good too.

    Don't force him to do things. Let him lead the play, but provide the things that improve fine motor control as options frequently. Don't expect clear drawings/painting or good scissor control until a lot closer to 5, but things should show some improvement before that.
    This cutting playdough is great too.

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    Ok I must have got the 2 confused
    He's a car freak and loves his train sets and car track sets. He builds with blocks. Does lots of puzzles and painting, playdoh and drawing at home. I did mention to dh a few weeks back that he didn't seem to be good at staying within the lines and doesn't press very hard when drawing but he draws shapes and what resembles people. He feeds himself ok too. Hes been riding his bike with trainer wheels since he was 2.5yrs, kicks the footy really well and catches the ball too. And he doesn't get at all frustrated with anything. It's just the using scissors and drawing. Might get a referral to the OT and see what they think.


 

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