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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbf2plus2 View Post
    Could someone explain "the spectrum" to me? Where does it start and where does it finish?
    The range is from normal to severely affected by autism, in a continuous range, covering the entire population. The DSM (published by the American Psychiatric Association) has a list of criteria to meet for diagnosis in the US. So the part of the spectrum labelled autism starts where particular features recognised as being part of autism start becoming apparent, and finishes at the most severely affected individual.

    Take one feature, being attention to detail, or being able to filter out detail and gloss over things. (Seeing the trees or the forest.)
    - Some people go through life blissfully ignorant of the detail in the world around them. Even though I think they'd be far from where autism starts, I wouldn't call these people normal, but it's still part of the spectrum of human attention to detail. (Always see forest, can't see trees.)
    - Some can see trees when they're needed, and forest when it's needed. This would be normal.
    - Some people can put their natural attention to detail it to good use e.g. by cataloguing library books. I also wouldn't call librarians normal . There are quite a number of professions that benefit from some mild to moderate autistic traits. (More inclined to see trees, but are able to see forest.)
    - Other people get so overloaded by the amount of detail around them, and treat every detail as being of equal and vital importance, that it's all too much to cope with and they can't function properly because of it. (Can't see forest. Even trees might be too general. Might see each vein on each leaf and each tiny bit of bark.)

    And every possible gradation between and beyond those examples make up the attention to detail spectrum.
    Now couple that with other features of autism, which are also ranged on their own spectra and you can build a picture of the autism spectrum.

    If someone with proper autism knowledge thinks my simplified explanation is plain wrong let me know and I'll remove it. I'm just an amateur in the topic.

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    Gut health.
    totally with this.

  4. #53
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    Ky is offline <--- Ruby, the most precious little red gem ever!
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    I have a son with Aspergers. His uncle and grandmother both have seriously pronounced traits (undiagnosed though) and DH has some mild traits.

    BIL has a multimillion dollar business. MIL is a nurse with a degree. DH is a wonderful husband and Daddy. I don't think that my sweet DS will amount to anything less in his life. His contribution to society will be great, he will be a loving husband and father and he will be sucessful.

    The reason I am glad of his diagnosis is that it means that I am feeling less of a failure when he truly doesn't understand consequences/emotions/tones of voice/colloquialisms etc. When his behaviour is strange, when he wanders off with no idea of how worried I am, when he obsesses, when he has to know the exact time we will arrive etc, I know I've done nothing wrong. I know how I can make his life easier to understand and how I can make mine easier to cope with.

    I have a beautiful 9yo boy who is polite, caring and a delight to spend time with. He is interesting and I love him. His brilliance amazes me!

    I never thought I would have a child who was so definitely on the spectrum. I thought that autism was just "naughty children with a lack of discipline". I knew all of the cliches and although I kept them to myself, they were definitely milling in my mind.

    That was until I met some lovely Mums with children who have autism. I was suddenly privy to the work that went into every day with their children and learned that it was most definitely not a lack of discipline. I also learned that there was a wide range of ASD and even kids that seemed "normal" could need the support and guidance to get through life with their particular "quirks".

    I think that there is more of a good guideline for diagnosis. I know from experience that it is a long, complicated, expensive and difficult path gaining a diagnosis. It is not a diagnosis which is easily dished out.

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  6. #54
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    I was reading about a recent study that showed a link between maternal weight and autism, was a small study though IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    I was reading about a recent study that showed a link between maternal weight and autism, was a small study though IMO.
    I saw this today too, there were also links with diabetes and pre eclampsia I think? Interesting stuff.

  8. #56
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    I wanted to come back to this thread and say I read something the other day that suggested a correlation between immediate cord clamping and autism and CP. 'twas interesting

  9. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by OJandMe View Post
    They are also saying that a mutated gene in the fathers sperm cell that occurred during HIS gestation can contribute to passing on Autism in a family with more than one child with autism....

    University of Iowa (2007, May 3). Sperm Mutation Linked To Autism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 4, 2012, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2007/05/070503125726.htm


    As I said in my first post, the age of parents with children with Austism on the Hub does not offer a representation of the statistics on the whole.... as generally younger women tend to be more associated with forums than older women.
    wow - thanks for the link ... I'm always interested in findings on this topic

    I know of several families where there is more than one child with ASD .. so it is interesting that they think they might have a genetic reasoning now ..

    I agree with PPers that commented that its more to do with increased diagnosis .. I teach a large number of children who are diagnosed with sensory processing disorders, and often within a few years, this diagnosis is changed to ASD.

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    Was that overweight or underweight?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    I was reading about a recent study that showed a link between maternal weight and autism, was a small study though IMO.

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    I know several families with more than one child on the spectrum. They are saying now that if you have one ASD child the chance of having another is 18% and if you have two ASD children the chance your next child will be on the spectrum is 50%.

  12. #60
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    Was that overweight or underweight?
    Overweight risk was about 67% higher from memory?


 

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