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  1. #1
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    Default Why is the autism rate increasing

    Good Lord, it almost makes me afraid to have another kid. April is Autism awareness month. I read this morning the rates are now 1 in 88... Boys specifically 1 in 54. I have my own theories as to why the rate keeps going up, but i'm curious what everyone else thinks???

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    Increased diagnosis.

    There were some threads on BH within the past couple of days discussing ASD. And after children were receiving their diagnoses parents were identifying the same traits in themselves, even though they have not been officially diagnosed. So there's a large adult population around which are missing from the figures for ~30 years ago, making those rates simply appear lower than they really are.

    Also, only slightly tongue-in-cheek, advent of social interaction over internet may help more people with traditional social difficulties find a partner - and then pass autism susceptibility on to their children.

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    I think it's to do with schools/parents wanting the child to be diagnosed with something so they can help them/ get funding for one on one at school etc.

    Autism is not something to be scared or afraid about you would be surprised how many children or adults are on the autism spectrum and you would never even know!


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    Last edited by mummyrissa; 04-04-2012 at 05:32.

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    I think it is because people are more aware and accepting nowadays. As pp said its all about getting extra help to make transitions easier for those students who do need a little extra tlc.

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    We had this discussion yesterday at home. My dh and I threw lots of ideas around but really couldn't come up with anything (can't think of the right word here) obvious? Solid?

    People are more open to getting help now so maybe that's why?
    Society is more accepting ?
    I'd like to hear ppl's ideas too

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    i don't think they are actually going up. i think its awareness that is.
    people can do their own research and look for their own answers these days so easily and often that's all that's needed to get the ball rolling.
    people can see the benefit of a diagnosis for their child ie funding for aide time therapies etc where as many yrs ago all a diagnosis might have achieved for many would have been a stigma.


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    I think it comes down to more people being correctly diagnosed as well.

    In the past, people were sometimes thought to be 'different' or 'a bit slow' (not terms i like but quite common unfortunately) but now that more people are aware that there is a large spectrum of symptoms they are able to identify some less obvious factors.

    Through my work in Childcare I see a lot of children with ASD and quite often new staff and sometimes parents just think the children are "naughty children" so it's easy to see that parents could pass off milder cases as being behavioural..

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    I also believe its primarily increased awareness and diagnosis. I know I have traits of asd (not surprising since its a spectrum), some quite pronounced, but when I was a kid I was just considered 'very sensitive'. My mother is the same.

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    In the past people were just thought of as "slow" or if they were higher functioning on the spectrum "different",
    Now there is more diagnosis which is so beneficial to the children as they can have learning adapted for them.

    So funny what a pp said, I hadn't thought about Internet dating but it's SO TRUE!! !!!

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    Definitely greater awareness, acceptance and better diagnoses.

    What once would've been labelled 'difficult', 'socially awkward' or 'slow'... are now being diagnosed as actual disorders rather than cruel, misunderstood and inaccurate labelling.

    My grandfather, several uncles and an aunt are diagnosed with Aspergers, my mum displays Aspergic traits, but we believe those to be socially conditioned. My dad also is very Aspergic, but refuses a diagnosis. The only reason my mum's sibling are diagnosed is because my uncle works for Asperger's Syndrome NZ. Until 10-15 years ago they were just 'odd'.

    My DS is suspected of having ASD. He's only just turned 2, we were offered a diagnosis at 16 months which I declined as I felt it was too easy and am happy to deal with the individual issues he has rather than a label, BUT the upside to diagnosis may win out, carers payment, assistance in school etc... for now it's not going to happen, but I can definitely see why people would pursue a diagnosis when the issues are manageable without one.
    Last edited by BlissedOut; 04-04-2012 at 06:42.

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