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  1. #11
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    I was wondering about that. I do eat red meat once a week, and other meat a few times too, and my diet is healthy. I don't know what my iron levels are like now but in pregnancy they were excellent and I have no reason to think they are low now. DD is thriving too.

    I have given DD eggs with spinach, and we tried chicken the other day. She loved the meat-she is definitely going to be a carnivore

    She did have one green poo the other day though 2 days after having eggs, so I am keeping an eye on that. A few months ago she had a lot of green ones and I had to give up caffeine/chocolate as she seemed to have a problem with it (I had only been having one weak coffee a day), so I know it can be a sign of intolerance.
    Last edited by rosycheeks; 08-04-2012 at 08:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle_N View Post
    So if the theory is the amount of iron in breastmilk is reduced by 6 months for whatever reason, would increasing the amount of iron in your diet then also increase the amount of iron in breastmilk? If this is the case why don't the 'health professionals' just tell the mums to eat more iron?
    The amount of iron is not reducing in breast milk , it's that after 6 months babies need more as they have a massive growth spurt over the next few years , most babies survive quite well up until the ages of 2 plus on breast milk , they also need more protein and vitamins/minerals which is why nature intended them to start solids after 6 months in addition to breast milk/formula - As pp said I think breast milk absorbs the iron nearly 50-60% more than formula/supplements

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle_N View Post
    So if the theory is the amount of iron in breastmilk is reduced by 6 months for whatever reason, would increasing the amount of iron in your diet then also increase the amount of iron in breastmilk? If this is the case why don't the 'health professionals' just tell the mums to eat more iron?
    I'm 7 wks pregnant now and doc did full bloods so that if I do have a deficiency now we can have it sorted by the time I give birth. This is our fourth child and i had no idea prior to seeing this doctor. She's fantastic.

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    Also, babies are born with iron stores that last for a minimum of 6 months. That's where the 'add iron from 6 months' thing also came from. But it doesn't instantly drop at 6 months, and for some babies the stores will last them much longer than that. Of course, we don't know which babies this will be, so they say to start solids for iron from 6 months.

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    Sorry OP for derailing your thread and thank you ladies for the info!

    So basically mums should increase their intake of iron rich foods after 6 months and introduce iron rich foods (not farex). Sounds simple enough!

    This is my third and I am intend to try BLW with DD....I am struggling with the whole 'no farex' as which my previous two it was YOU MUST START USING RICE CEREAL. No ifs, ands or buts so I am trying real hard to get my head around it all.

    I do like the idea of increasing my intake of iron foods as from what pp said about iron being absorbed better through breastmilk.

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    Actually, the introduction of iron-fortified foods into a babies diet could hamper the absorption of the natural iron in your breast-milk, so be careful on that one. I don't know if there is a difference between iron-rich (naturally) or iron fortified foods on breastmilk iron... maybe something to research?

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    The iron in breastmilk I think is called lactoferritin is a smaller molecule that's absorbed easily by the gut. So all the iron in mums breastmilk is absorbed so low quantities are required. Mum converts iron in food to lactoferritin effectively.

    In iron rich foods there is lots of iron but it's in the wrong form. The liver produces an enzyme that converts the iron. But you need a great deal more iron in order to convert enough that will be absorbed. Vit c helps with the conversion and absorption.

    So basically if there are 10 iron molecules in breastmilk then 9 or 10 would be absorbed. But you would need 100 molecules in foods to achieve the same amount.

    Hope this helps. I'll find the biochemical reaction a bit later when I have both hands free

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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Michelle, just let them eat off your plate
    This is what I am looking forward to!

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    http://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron/

    About iron and babies needs.

    Dietary Iron as in ferric iron Fe3+ needs to be converted to ferrous iron Fe2+ in the stomach by stomach acids and Vit C. The ferrous form as in Fe2+ is much more soluble and is easily utilised by the body. The other form of iron stays solid in the gut/duodenum and cannot be used.

    Tietz Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry (2001) p 595.

    I was wrong before about the liver making an enzyme to covert iron - the stomach does that but the liver along with other organs store iron in the form of Ferritin. A true iron deficient person with have low stores of ferritin as quite often a well functioning body will have low amounts of iron in the blood but high stores.





  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle_N View Post
    Sorry OP for derailing your thread
    Not at all, I was hoping to find out about this too. Thank you everyone for all the useful information ]

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