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  1. #181
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    I used to identify as bisexual, but since getting involved with the gay rights movement and learning more terms and meeting new people, I figured out I was pansexual. But I get termed as 'curious' because I've never been with anyone other than men.

    I find that with men I'm attracted to personality, then looks, and with women it's looks first. DH says it might be because my brain might look at relationships with men as long term (and therefore compatibility is an issue), and women in the short term.

    Androgyny and trans-persons I find depends more on the personality.

    Needless to say, DH thinks it awesome... I perve more than he does on women, AND I'm a girl-geek. He never has to beg to play video games because I'm usually busy with my own lol

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    Caviar  (27-03-2012)

  3. #182
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    Being gay isn't genetic nor a choice. I'm not sure about the case with women but i know with men that the attraction to other men comes from a shift in certain chemicals in the brain. Something that is inherent within their body, dispelling the idea of 'choice'. Learnt about it in science at uni..

  4. #183
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    I am acutely aware that as a bisexual person who ended up marrying someone of the opposite sex I received the "heterosexual privilege" of being able to marry the person I love as well as not be scrutinised by a large proportion of society. But in no way did I choose a man over a woman in order to make my life easier. I feel very sad to think that if I had fallen in love with a woman I wanted to marry first that the relationship would not be recognised.

  5. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to HouseOfFun For This Useful Post:

    Caviar  (27-03-2012),FiveInTheBed  (27-03-2012),Gandalf  (31-03-2012),Guest1234  (26-03-2012),missybubble  (27-03-2012),zonlach  (27-03-2012)

  6. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by HouseOfFun View Post
    I am acutely aware that as a bisexual person who ended up marrying someone of the opposite sex I received the "heterosexual privilege" of being able to marry the person I love as well as not be scrutinised by a large proportion of society. But in no way did I choose a man over a woman in order to make my life easier. I feel very sad to think that if I had fallen in love with a woman I wanted to marry first that the relationship would not be recognised.
    I'm in the same boat

  7. #185
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    *intersexed not hermaphrodite ... that one word shows your knowledge of intersexed peoples.
    Actually, I think I'd check your statement. I watched a documentary called 'Stripped' the other night about, in part, people who were born with the Klinefelter's Syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities and all identified themselves as hermaphrodites. Some went even as far as to reject the term intersex.

    It was noted that the Intersex Society of North America refuses to use the word hermaphrodite instead of the word intersex saying that it's a stigmatism and that a person who has both sexes is 'biologically impossible', something that is not supported by the medical community. This term usage is a common stance with activists. However, I further noted that this was refuted by those who actually live with the condition and is considered insulting as, which one person pointed out, it implies they have a disorder.

    Hermaphrodite is also a common term used in Australia.

    So it would appear that the term hermaphrodite is actually a preferred term for those who would otherwise be described by others as intersexed and is widely used in various industries such as law, medicine and health.

    But in no way did I choose a man over a woman in order to make my life easier.
    Neither did I

  8. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caviar View Post
    Actually, I think I'd check your statement. I watched a documentary called 'Stripped' the other night about, in part, people who were born with the Klinefelter's Syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities and all identified themselves as hermaphrodites. Some went even as far as to reject the term intersex.

    It was noted that the Intersex Society of North America refuses to use the word hermaphrodite instead of the word intersex saying that it's a stigmatism and that a person who has both sexes is 'biologically impossible', something that is not supported by the medical community. This term usage is a common stance with activists. However, I further noted that this was refuted by those who actually live with the condition and is considered insulting as, which one person pointed out, it implies they have a disorder.

    Hermaphrodite is also a common term used in Australia.

    So it would appear that the term hermaphrodite is actually a preferred term for those who would otherwise be described by others as intersexed and is widely used in various industries such as law, medicine and health.



    Neither did I

    WAs that the show about the photograher??
    That was great!!

    I'm not 100% sure when it comes to terminology - but it's worth looking into...and assume it would be a really personal thing (same as the 'labels' gay, bi etc)

    When I hear Hermaphrodite I think of the natural world where some splendid creatures have both WORKING genitalia.
    ..I 'think' (again I would need to research) - that humans born with both - only one 'works' and one is more concealed?
    - showing my ignorance - and apologies if I have offended.

    On that show one guy vented his frustrated that simple things lke filling out a form SUCKS - one box says 'male' one box says 'female' ..there is an option for people who aren't technically one or the other.

  9. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    WAs that the show about the photograher??
    That was great!!

    I'm not 100% sure when it comes to terminology - but it's worth looking into...and assume it would be a really personal thing (same as the 'labels' gay, bi etc)

    When I hear Hermaphrodite I think of the natural world where some splendid creatures have both WORKING genitalia.
    ..I 'think' (again I would need to research) - that humans born with both - only one 'works' and one is more concealed?
    - showing my ignorance - and apologies if I have offended.

    On that show one guy vented his frustrated that simple things lke filling out a form SUCKS - one box says 'male' one box says 'female' ..there is an option for people who aren't technically one or the other.


    Yes, it was. The woman was born with both sets of working genitalia (penis, vagina, ovaries etc). When she was a child her parents elected to have her grow up as male and when she was 28 decided to continue life as female as this is how she wanted to live her life. Her partner, however, identified as both and referred to the term hermaphrodite on a number of occasions. I simply watched, utterly fascinated.

  10. #188
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    Love this question!
    I hate especially that people refuse to believe your homosexual or bisexual until you've had s3x. Ive head but you cant know until youve had sex, until than your just "curious"
    Yet you can be a v!rgin and say your heterosexual with out question

    However I think I chose to be straight in my young teens when I had no idea about bisexuality. My early attraction to girls and women was suppressed until mY late teens when I was very shocked to realize that I was bi. Now I wonder if it was social conditioning of hetronomative that led my to at first think I was straight than bi. If I was raised in a society where hetrosexual/bisexual/homosexual was consider universally normal would I than be different? I'm not sure

  11. #189
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    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    Even if sexuality/sexual preference was 100% choice, why does it matter? What difference does it make? We're talking about 2 (or more ) consenting adults whose actions are affecting no one but themselves. I just don't guess what the fuss is all about. Homosexuality has been around since the dawn of time, it's not going to go away. It was obviously around in biblical times as well given the references in the bible. To deny someone the physical expression of love or expect they abstein from lovemaking is just cruel.

  12. #190
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    I don't think it's something you ever choose. You just know... And it works both ways


 

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