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  1. #21
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    Unfortunately I don't think I would

    I'd be too worried about him being picked on for it.

  2. #22
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    I'm starting to chicken out on the idea I think I'll just hide the pink one and use his old green lunch box for now. Like some of you say, kids can be cruel and I don't want to let him choose the pink one (he insists he wants to take it). He probably doesn't even know how cruel they can be, so it would be a but mean to put him in that situation. He's pretty much the oldest kid in the class and quite popular, but still, not sure I can go through with it

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    I don't think the kids would notice at kinder, unless they have bad influences at home from older kids/adults.

    I think if he wants to take it I'd let him Hollywood, I know kids can be cruel but I'm really not sure they'd notice at that age.

    My DS only started 'learning' that kids will pick on boys who wear or have pink things and he's turning 6 in a week - he's more mature than most grown adults I must admit. He's currently got a pink and purple blanket on his bed from when he went through a pink phase at age 3 and he told me "some people say pink is a girls colour but it's just a colour and I like it". I'm glad he's already showing signs of not following the masses.

  4. #24
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    kids are jerks.

    the boys in my ds's class pick on him if he uses a pink pencil to colour in with! ridiculous!

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  6. #25
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    I know this doesn't really help in your situation OP, but just thought everyone might be interested in this fact: Historically, pink was actually the colour used for baby boys while girls were dressed in blue. It was thought that pink (a variation of the strong colour red) was the stronger colour while blue was softer. Blue was also associated with the Virgin Mary so was reserved for girls. Would be hard to imagine baby boys dressed in pink these days!

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    Yeah, DS at first said no, but he actually wants to use it now. I gave him the choice of waiting until the blue one came in and using his old lunch box, or using the pink one...and he has chosen to use the pink one.
    That's great! Even if he does have a problem there is nothing wrong with kids learning to assert themselves and it's empowering for him to know early on that just because someone else doesn't like it, doesn't mean he has to follow, he can just say 'I like my lunch box and it doesn't worry me that you don't like it'. It doesn't have to be framed as being picked on unless it is continual.

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  9. #27
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    If it was just pink, and he didn't have a problem with it, then I wouldn't either...but I probably wouldn't send him with a girly character or anything, just because kids can be really mean.

  10. #28
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    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by annablam View Post
    I know this doesn't really help in your situation OP, but just thought everyone might be interested in this fact: Historically, pink was actually the colour used for baby boys while girls were dressed in blue. It was thought that pink (a variation of the strong colour red) was the stronger colour while blue was softer. Blue was also associated with the Virgin Mary so was reserved for girls. Would be hard to imagine baby boys dressed in pink these days!
    Yep, this is true Boys were wearing pink until as late as the 1920's. It's fascinating how cultural stereotypes change over time.

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    i wouldn't.

  12. #30
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    rainbow road is offline look at the stars, look how they shine for you
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    If he wanted it, yes I would, but I wouldn't force it on him.

    But I try really hard not to enforce gender stereotypes on any of the children I'm around.

    I painted my nails the other day and the little boy I look after indicated he wanted his done too. So I let him choose a colour and he chose pink.

    His mum said she didn't mind if I painted his nails, then got angry when I painted them pink, not blue.

    Meh. The kid wanted pink nails! It won't make his penis fall off.

    Having said that, I won't make a boy play with a doll if he wants to play with a truck just to be subversive. I just let them play with whatever they want!

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