View Poll Results: Would you home birth?

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  • Home birth

    19 47.50%
  • have a hospital birth?

    21 52.50%
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  1. #31
    Buttoneska's Avatar
    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetseven View Post
    People can be deemed "high risk" for any number of reasons that others dispute the validity of, such as:
    * having had a prior C/sec, or
    * BMI too high, or
    * too old, or
    * having had three prior births, or
    * refusing a standard test (eg gestational diabeties test), or
    * a previous hospital labour that didn't follow the hospitals schedule, or
    * a myraid of other reasons.

    --------------

    The hospital environment can be stressful for the labouring mother and thus adversely effect the birth. With those suggesting: "why take the risk having a homebirth?" I counter that with "why take the risk having a hospital birth?" Everything brings risk, it is (or should be) up to the patient to determine which risks they are willing to accept.
    I do agree with everything you wrote. This is whole problem with the poor system we have now. Very few women would be deemed 'suitable' while a vast number of them could probably quite safely HB.

    I do believe though that some women are definately high risk and the risks far outway the advantages (or the HB risks are greater then the hospital risks).

    Ppl do die at hospitals and things go wrong.

    As I have said, I personally believe the only way forward is to fully support choice and bridge the gap between us and them. Stop making it a war where women HB or hospital birth regardless of the risks, but they are doing because they have weighed up the risks and are making an informed, balanced and reasonably safe choice beit a HB or hospital birth.
    Last edited by Buttoneska; 17-03-2012 at 20:26.

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  3. #32
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    I had a great hospital birth with DS1, but I still would have preferred a home birth this time.
    Unfortunately it just wasn't affordable for us it's definitely something I will consider next time, when I am hopefully in a better position financially.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artful View Post
    Not all women from remote communities are taken to towns where there are adequate hospital facilities four weeks before their DD. They are also not made to move if they don't want to. However a lot of these women, for various reasons, are high risk and live in incredibly remote areas and so do move into town when that advice is given. A number of communities I work with in WA can only be accessed by air, and sometimes even then only comfortably in the dry season. IF they went into labour early either they or their baby or both could die. there are no facilities if anything went wrong, no doctor or midwife on call just in case, no hospital in driving distance.

    Home birth is a great idea for suitable candidates, but not as a blanket proposition and not every time.
    Hey, that's me! I live in a remote town and I have to leave 4 weeks before baby is due. We have one midwife in town, but the hospital isn't equipped for births and certainly not if anything went wrong.

    I chose hospital birth because for me that is where I feel comfortable. I like the break of being in hospital and the support of the midwives for the first few days.

    I think it will take a lot to change the perception towards home births in Australia. The media, especially recently, has created such fear around it and has demonised private midwives because of a few unfortunate home births where either baby or mum didn't survive.

    I definitely think the choice should be available though, and a system put in place similar to NZ and Holland to allow women who want to home birth the opportunity to.

  5. #34
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    I have had my three babies in a hospital birth centre and I had positive experiences with them all. I'm not having a 4th baby but if I was I'd seriously consider a home birth.

    Who cleans up? Generally the midwives clean up at a home birth. There might be a load of washing to hang out or something but that's it.

    The problem is not with homebirthing, stastically homebirthing is a safer option than giving birth in a hospital. The problem is with the system. Not all hospitals happily accept a homebirthing woman who has been transferred to hospital. Some OB's take it upon themselves to make the birthing woman 'suffer' because she wanted to give birth at home. This is a fact and it is a HUGE flaw in our system.
    The fact that the hospital led homebirth programs are so strict with regards to what is and isn't 'high risk' and the expense of a private midwife some women feel their only option is to freebirth which is different to a homebirth and people need to not confuse the two. A freebirth is without a trained professional there to assist. Many freebirths go ahead beautifully but not all do and when something goes wrong the media love to label it as a 'homebirth.'
    No one should ever under estimate the effect a bad labouring experience can have on a mother's mental and physical well being. There are plenty of stories on BH alone of women suffering life long damage from the way they were brutually treated in the hospital environment. Even if you think the end result is all that matters if you have a traumatic experience you won't forget it easily. You probably will never forget it especially if you have a daily physical reminder. There's a reason that women who have had a traumatic labour are watched more closely for PND than those who had an empowering experience.

    A lot of people say 'why take the risk to birth at home' but a lot of people look at the statistics coming from their local hospital and say 'why take the risk at hospital?' Every woman should be entitled to choose where her baby is born.

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  7. #35
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    Personally, I would never have a home birth. I find the idea too scary and risky for me to consider. I had an emergency ceaser because my son had tied a knot in the cord, and his heartrate was dropping. He was on oxygen for 6 hours after his arrival. If I had tried to birth at home, he wouldn't have made it. Also, I don't like pain and I'm all for drugs during labour!

    If people want to homebirth, I don't see why it should be a problem. As long as people are aware of any risks, and comfortable with their choice I think it should be their right.

  8. #36
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    I very nearly went ahead with a homebirth for DD2.

    In the end we didn't because we were moving interstate and there were too many question marks surrounding the move etc.

    Instead I stayed at home for as long as possible and went in to hospital (5 minutes away) when I 'felt' the time was right. When I arrived they said that I was 8cms and would be holding DD very soon.

    Well.... from the moment we pulled up outside the hospital I felt panicky and on edge, so I stayed at 8cms for the best part of 12 hours, and was finally pushing DD2 out - in fact she was crowning - when I felt excruciating pain in my right side. My uterus ruptured and it was declared Grade 1 emergency or something to that effect. Being the country though, it took 1.45 hours for me to be taken to theatre and anaesthetised.

    I lost 4 litres of blood, but DD and I pulled through remarkably well actually. Although it could have gone very differently, I know.

    DH has made the comment several times since that *HE* feels that if we had have had that home birth, that I would have been comfortable and relaxed and wouldn't have had such a prolonged time between 8cms and birth, making my uterus less stressed and possibly avoiding a rupture.

    It's really interesting to me, and I feel that he might well be correct, although of course we will never know.

    The other thing is, if I had have had the rupture at home, it would have been 'because I had a home birth' and I would have come under a lot of blame from others. But because I had it in hospital, it was just considered a lucky escape.

    Although, if it had have occured at home, I would have been a 5 minute ambulance ride away from hospital, and considering I waited 1 hour and 45 minutes in the hospital it wouldn't have made much difference anyway.

    I am still very much pro home birth, although if I have any more babies (unlikely) it will be by 'elective' c-section at 37 weeks to avoid another rupture.

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  10. #37
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    I ordered my copy of this film yesterday....i am so looking forward to seeing it! A lot of work and time has gone into the making of it, and i'm sure the results will be wonderful.

    I have had two good hospital births. Fast labours, straight forward deliveries, great outcomes for the babies and myself. I am planning a home birth with the babe i'm currently carrying. I'm doing it through a hospital funded home birth program. I was able to choose my own midwife (i chose the same midwife who did my care for DS2, so we know each other already), and she fully supports me, and my partner in our choices of where, and how i birth. The second she or i feel something is not right, we're straight to hospital, and i'm fine with that. I have full faith in her, my body and the birth process.

    ETA: I chose home birth in the poll. Though i have no personal reason to dislike hospital birth, i am choosing to home birth this time as i'm a healthy woman, carrying a healthy babe, and i would rather a much needed hospital bed go to someone who actually needs it, among other things.

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  12. #38
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tainted View Post
    Personally, I would never have a home birth. I find the idea too scary and risky for me to consider. I had an emergency ceaser because my son had tied a knot in the cord, and his heartrate was dropping. He was on oxygen for 6 hours after his arrival. If I had tried to birth at home, he wouldn't have made it. Also, I don't like pain and I'm all for drugs during labour!

    If people want to homebirth, I don't see why it should be a problem. As long as people are aware of any risks, and comfortable with their choice I think it should be their right.
    I understand and respect that was your experience, my son was also born with a knot in his cord at home, it's not always an issue my sons heartrate was perfect the entire time my midwife was present (the last 6 hours of a 16hr labour) he was born with 10 and 10 agar scores in perfect health.

    "You can’t simply cut and paste all the circumstances surrounding a given hospital birth, superimpose them on a homebirth setting, and predict the same outcome — or vice versa. The models of care are too divergent. Women can die from birth complications in any setting, and our hospital death rate from birth-related causes is indefensibly high. We know that low-risk women are as safe, if not safer, birthing at home." http://www.holisticwithhumor.com/if-...idwives-battle

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    My son's initial APGAR was 1. He was blue, and not breathing. His heartrate was an issue from the time I got to the hospital. I was panicking about being in labour to start with, which I'm sure was not helping my little man. I understand things that go wrong in hospital may not go wrong in a home setting, where a mother is relaxed and comfortable. I also understand that issues that could be life-threatening at home can be easily treated in hospital.

    I respect the rights of a mother to decide where she wants to deliver her baby, and I have no issue with people who choose homebirth. For me, I was happy to have a hospital birth, with access to drugs and numerous hightly trained medical personell around to deal with any issues that could have occured. I was a young, healthy woman with an easy pregnancy and a perfectly healthy baby. I just feel that things can change so quickly, and for me I needed to feel safe in the knowledge help was at hand if needed.

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    I think there is some confusion as to what midwives have available with them when they attend a homebirth. They come equipped to handle a baby that comes out with a low apgar score, or not breathing. They have oxygen, they monitor the baby's heart rate, they are trained to know when things aren't looking right with the need to have the labouring woman hooked up to machines telling her what to do. They know what to do if a mother starts losing a lot of blood etc.

    As far as emergencies go...it takes at least 15 minutes for everything to be ready for theatre so if you find yourself needing an emergency c-section then a phonecall ahead of time and a fast ambulance ride and you're no worse off.

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