View Poll Results: Would you home birth?

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  • Home birth

    19 47.50%
  • have a hospital birth?

    21 52.50%
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  1. #21
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronessM View Post
    She broke these rules and nearly paid for it badly.
    So her punishment for being a norty woman was her baby nearly dying? Do you see ANYTHING wrong with this statement???

    It actually makes me vomit in my mouth to read fellow women saying stuff like this. What about all the women that birthed in hospital and had their babies die, how do they pay the price? Or aren't they required to pay because they were 'good little women'??

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  3. #22
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    I look forward to seeing this documentary. I think home birth is a fantastic thing and is a choice that should be available to expectant mothers who are good candidates.

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  5. #23
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    Just wanted to say too- women die in hospital too, from simple things like a bleed, or undiagnosed things like placenta accreta etc. I have read coroners reports about these things and being in hospital does not guarantee this won't happen to you. I personally think if you have a history of birth complications, the best thing is to be in/very close to, a hospital, but ultimately, it is a woman's choice. She loves her baby more than any of us and will weigh up the risks and benefits as she sees fit. Babies also die from interventions such as forceps/ventouse which are often not needed in a homebirth setting, as the woman is given time to birth her baby without being 'on the clock' so to say.

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  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwergele View Post
    Personally, I don't get the home birthing thing. After all that we go through to get pregnant , then stay pregnant , why take a chance ? I couldn't do it anyway, because I am high-risk, but who cares in the end how and where they are born. All that matters in the end, is that we end up with a baby to take home. In labour lots of things can go wrong at any given time, how good is it that we have modern medicine at our fingertips. Even if you have a hospital near by, time can be of the essence and I don't think it's worth taking any chances.
    It matters a great deal how our babies come into the world. Maybe not to some people but for others it is with them for a long time if they have a bad birth experience. It can contribute to post natal depression, difficult bonding and more.

    I had a great, natural birth last time, but the person I allowed to be my birth partner caused me some post traumatic stress in the months afterwards.

    So yes, it is a huge deal in a lot of ways. There is no reason not to have the birth you want AND a healthy baby, in normal pregnancies/labours.


    ETA: Thermo & Annabella said it sooo much better
    Last edited by Stiflers Mom; 17-03-2012 at 09:32.

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  9. #25
    Buttoneska's Avatar
    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    From wiki
    Bodily integrity, otherwise known as physical or corporal integrity, is a concept that refers to the inviolability of the physical body. It is one of Martha Nussbaum’s ten principle capabilities (Capability approach). She defines bodily integrity as: “Being able to move freely from place to place; being able to be secure against violent assault, including sexual assault . . . ; having opportunities for sexual satisfaction and for choice in matters of reproduction”.[1]

    A suitable candidate? That phrase is dripping with exactly what I was trying to point out, no one should have the right to tell a woman what they can or cannot do when it comes to birth, all women should be supported in their informed choices full stop there should not be any, only if you fit in this box criteria. That's like telling a woman she can't have a cs for non medical reasons!
    I do agree that a women should be able to chose what is best for them and their family. I struggle to understand how an informed women can come the conclusion that homebirth is the best option when she is high risk, particulary during the 3rd stage of labour.

    To each their own, but I don't personally agree with that utter determination to have a home birth regardless of your medical situation and likelyhood of complications. If a person is high risk, they are high risk.

    Ultimately if they still chose to homebirth of course it is their choice and I am not saying they shouldn't be able to make that decision.

    But I do think introducing a system that offered real support to women to empower to make the best, safest choice and bridged the gap between medical and HB would achieve the best outcomes.

  10. #26
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwergele View Post
    Personally, I don't get the home birthing thing. After all that we go through to get pregnant , then stay pregnant , why take a chance ? I couldn't do it anyway, because I am high-risk, but who cares in the end how and where they are born. All that matters in the end, is that we end up with a baby to take home. In labour lots of things can go wrong at any given time, how good is it that we have modern medicine at our fingertips. Even if you have a hospital near by, time can be of the essence and I don't think it's worth taking any chances.
    I obviously didn't get the memo on the experience not being important, because having flash backs to my child abuse was my choice while I was in labour during my hospital birth, I suppose I could of prevented that by not having any expectations bar a healthy baby? ImageUploadedByBub Hub1331940697.414379.jpg tell that to the apple.

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  12. #27
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    I am a strong advocate for homebirth, in a safe supported environment.

    When I was researching freebirth, I was quite shocked about the risks undertaken in one beautiful birth story. Thankfully everything worked out fine and there were no complications. The story involved the mother selecting the ideal location to birth. It was a cabin on the side of a mountain. They drove as far as they could by 4wd then had to climb four hours to reach the cabin. They stayed there for weeks, and some friends were bringing supplies a week or two before the due date. The husband went down the mountain to meet the friends and show them the way back to the cabin, leaving the pregnant mother and toddler at the cabin. Of course that was the day labour started. So mother and toddler birthed alone, whilst husband and friends were climbing the mountain. At least in this story, there were no complications, and the toddler was not frightened.

    I am glad that everything worked out well for that family and they have this beautiful memory to cherish, but am concerned that it could've easily gone awry. What if, for example, the toddler had decided that Mum needed help and raced off to find Dad, possibly falling down a steep section? Then the labouring mother would be searching through mountainous bush in between contractions for the lost toddler. The stress would likely cause complications with the birth, and she would've had no way to call for help.

    I do not know where this family was located, but suspect that part of the reason they went to such a remote location was to prevent interference from well-meaning authorities. If women were just respected and supported in their choices, then some wouldn't feel the need to go to such extremes that could increase their risks.
    Last edited by sweetseven; 17-03-2012 at 09:37.

  13. #28
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    I'm due with my first early August & I have just joined my local Hypnobirthing class which is where I found out about this documentary. I love the idea of home birth but considering it is my first I think for the safe side I'm choosing my local hospital. The midwife I have spoken to knows my views, that I want a water birth, natural, drug free, delayed clamping & no interference unless absolutley needed etc etc. She is more excited about my birth than me!! I'm mesmerised by the stories from hypnobirthing mothers & I can only hope for the same outcome, but I am also attending the classes at the hospital so I am informed on ALL the options & choices if I have to make one in the end. I believe at the end of the day no matter what happens as long as the two of you are healthy that is all that matters. But I just hope that I don't have any pushy OBST or Midwives that try & take control over my body!!

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttoneska View Post
    To each their own, but I don't personally agree with that utter determination to have a home birth regardless of your medical situation and likelyhood of complications. If a person is high risk, they are high risk.
    People can be deemed "high risk" for any number of reasons that others dispute the validity of, such as:
    * having had a prior C/sec, or
    * BMI too high, or
    * too old, or
    * having had three prior births, or
    * refusing a standard test (eg gestational diabeties test), or
    * a previous hospital labour that didn't follow the hospitals schedule, or
    * a myraid of other reasons.

    --------------

    The hospital environment can be stressful for the labouring mother and thus adversely effect the birth. With those suggesting: "why take the risk having a homebirth?" I counter that with "why take the risk having a hospital birth?" Everything brings risk, it is (or should be) up to the patient to determine which risks they are willing to accept.

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  16. #30
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    Sorry OP, in your situation would I homebirth? or just in general?

    In your situation if homebirth was something I wanted I would have consulted with an obstetrician, and then also spoken to an independant midwife. Because of previous surgery it becomes more complicated than simply having faith in your body, because its not in its natural state IYKWIM

    For me personally, I dont think I could homebirth. I had complications during my DSs birth and my DH really struggles with the "what if we hadnt been in hospital" he is also ill informed on the topic of homebirth and thinks its incredibly dangerous I am also a bit of a worst case scenario type of person, and I was very happy with the birth of my daughter in a private hospital. I am all for homebirth, I just dont think its for us.

    BTW in WA they have a community midwife program = government funded homebirths


 

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