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  1. #1
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    Default Baby safety, what am I missing?

    So DS has just started to crawl this week, he is still pretty slow but I'm sure that won't last long.

    I have got down on the floor and had a good look around for anything that I don't want him to get his little hands on. I've put up hooks for the cords on the blinds (just need to remember to use them!) and tidied away the wires and other bits around the tv.

    I haven't touched anything in the kitchen yet as he isn't quick to get in there without me yet, but will look at that next.

    I don't want to put away everything as I want him to learn not to touch things when I tell him. (Is that unrealistic?)

    I'm sure I am missing loads of things... Can any BHers suggest things I should be looking out for?

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovehats View Post
    I don't want to put away everything as I want him to learn not to touch things when I tell him. (Is that unrealistic?)
    Not unrealistic its living in the real work imo I never had any so called baby safety installed with either child and amazing the older one is now 11

    teach them the word no works wonders

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    earthfairy  (15-03-2012)

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tormy View Post
    imo some kids are just very adventourous and you can say no, or dont touch till the cows come home and they will still go back and touch it as they are very curious. My DS loves to touch everything and see what they taste like, if they make a noise etc and will open everything he can find...on the other hand my neice who is 2 weeks older then my DS isn't as interested, if someone tells her not to do something she'll move onto the next thing.

    i found when DS started crawling a few things to look for is anything small ont he floor, no matter what it is they'll try and eat it. also put those covers over the plugs in all the outlets, as they will probably try and put things in it, and try and turn it on. We made all the kitchen drawers on the lower levels baby friendly - so its got tupperware, some old baking tins and wooden spoons for him to bang on etc. Also another thing to keep an eye on is the oven, i still worry about DS touchin the oven when its on.
    This is exactly right!
    I have drummed it into my daughter head the oven is hot and don't touch, she knows this and is very good about it (will even say be careful Mum you might burn yourself) Well she touched it the other day, I said "why did you touch it, you know the oven is hot" her exact words "I know mum I was just CURIOUS" she is 2.5. she it one extremely smart cookie and knows what things are dangerous but is still inquisitive. Babies are 10x worse! They do not understand and you can not reason/explain to them.
    Last edited by waterlily; 15-03-2012 at 21:12.

  5. #4
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    I agree with tormy. Although it wasn't a safety issue, my DD was obsessed with pulling the DVD's out of the cupboard. It could easily have been an obsession with something dangerous. No matter how many times we redirected, said no, cleaned them up etc she just went back again and again and again.

    It's really trial and error I think. As a bare minimum I would use power point protectors. We also had gated off our kitchen, as a crawling baby can't really be expected to understand the oven is hot. Obviously supervision is the key, but we are all human and all it takes is one momentary lapse of concentration. Having a kitchen gate gave me peace of mind.

    I'll be going through this again soon once DS starts to crawl. We've moved house since we had DD so it's a whole new environment.

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    depends on the child. ive found that its easier to put as much as possible out of reach rather than spend your whole day saying 'no' and 'dont touch'.
    i prefer a gate across the entrance to the kitchen than a heap of locks and clips etc.

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    tormyxxx  (15-03-2012)

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    Kidsafe have lots of fact sheets to help with house safety. Here's a link http://www.kidsafeqld.com.au/fact-sheets The one I've used is 'Home Safety' or something and just goes from room to room with things to think of. I agree that it's good to teach them 'no' etc, but some things can happen so quickly when you're distracted. We moved to an open plan home recently and my toddler had never dealt with a kitchen etc. The oven does my head in. Burning hot and she just doesn't get it yet. Knows its 'hot' but touches it out of curiosity. It's never been hot when she's touched it as I'm too paranoid to use it when she's awake, so I'm probably just confusing her anyway.

    Sounds like you've got it covered anyway One thing I can think of is to attach to walls furniture that your toddie can pull down on themselves. A friend of a friend's little one hurt themselves badly on a small bookcase this way. We rent here so I've just moved everything so if it falls, it leans on something solid.

    Hope that helps and good luck. So much to think about when they start moving!!

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    We also gated off the kitchen , bathroom and laundry , I put anything breakable or glass away and we fixed the tv in the lounge room to the wall and tied up cords etc but left the rest as is, he touched the electricity outlet a few times , and the water cooler in the family room was a big temptation but honestly after a few days of don't touch and quickly picking him up and moving him away , now at 17 months he honestly does not touch them , as pp,s have said the really dangerous things like stoves etc it's easier to block him than explain it to a 1 year old , but obviously he is always supervised as well

  10. #8
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    I like to put stoppers into empty power sockets. And if you have corners on your coffee table, you may want to consider some soft covers in case bub stumbles when learning to walk.

    And a baby gate to keep bub out of the kitchen, laundry, or stairwell, is a good idea too.

    At christmas time, a christmas tree can be a big problem. I've protected them in the past by:
    * putting it inside a playpen, or
    * elevating it on top of a table
    Last edited by sweetseven; 15-03-2012 at 21:20.

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    We rearranged our lounge room so that there was a large safe area for play without drawers to open, cords to play with or powerpoints to touch. We pretty much kept our ds's floor time to in the lounge room as much as possible and the kitchen was largely out of bounds til he could understand safety more. There's a child lock on the cupboard where the kitchen cleaners are stored, otherwise the drawers were all unlocked.

    Now, we have #2 and oi, what a different story!! Ds wants to play with all sorts of things that are dangerous to her (Lego, wooden train track that has ends that come out sometimes, small cars, etc, etc, etc). Although dd isn't crawling yet (not for lack of trying, it could be any day) she can roll & roll & roll. So, we're at the stage of needing to put up the playpen so she's got her own dedicated playspace and she won't invade our ds's playspace when he's at home. And to keep her safe in general (open plan living really isn't great when you have little bubbas).

  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    but obviously he is always supervised as well
    That is the key really, when they start walking they fall over their own feet can not baby proof that


 

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