View Poll Results: Who do you tell about your gifted child's achievements?

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  • Immediate family only (childs parents/siblings)

    7 33.33%
  • Extended family only (childs grandparents/aunts/uncles)

    5 23.81%
  • Family & a few friends

    4 19.05%
  • Anyone who is in my childs life

    6 28.57%
  • Other

    3 14.29%
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  1. #31
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    lol my DD is totally not athletic, she's a nerd (and I mean that in a positive way). We have also had the chat that every child has different strengths and hers is her brain. For others they run really fast, or swim really well. I suppose that's my frustration in the gifted debate. I don't think my child is 'better' than any other. We really shy away from elitism and being snobby towards other kids that maybe don't read or know their maths as well. She is a very down to earth, kind child that knows she is smart but also sees the strengths in everyone.

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    troopingfairy  (08-11-2012)

  3. #32
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    yes - though it was very difficult as the sports carnival have the whole 'everyones a winner' attitude ... so after me explaining carefully that it was good for other kids to win and show that they have special talents, that you cant win at everything and all the rest of it ... she got ribbons and stuff

    She gets the point of it though, so that is good

  4. #33
    AndrewTheEmu is offline Bubhub Ambassador - tongue in cheek
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    Default Do you keep quiet about your gifted child?

    That's dad mimi

    But yes I do keep quite about DDs abilities.

    She's 2 (and 5 months), knows her ABCs and recognizes all letters, can count (and recognize) numbers up to 100. Knows many many sight words. Can ride a bike. Etc.

    I don't tell people. They see/hear and comment though.

    I don't know it if an indication of what shell be when older though so no bragging rights yet

  5. #34
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    I find that DD still has tantrums and upon reading the information supplied by QAGCT I have been dealing with her outbursts differently and find that I am able to help calm her down, rather than giving her warnings and it ending up excalating with her in time out. Her rage excalates very fast and I have never understood just how she can be laughing and so happy one minute and completely filled with rage and anger the next... upon reading this -

    Difficulty making decisions. Gifted children, particularly if they’re divergent thinkers, may see so many sides of an issue, so many what-if’s and possible outcomes, that they become overwhelmed. Unable to manage the richness that floods their minds, unable to bear the contradictions and sense of loss about all the roads not taken, they’re unable to act. A child who can’t pick a dessert because she’s acutely aware of all the desserts she won’t be getting if she chooses apple pie – and who tantrums when adults urge her to hurry – may be seen as demanding and spoiled when her behavior is actually due to cognitive overload.

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    pinkdolly  (07-03-2013)

  7. #35
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    Default Do you keep quiet about your gifted child?

    Quote Originally Posted by troopingfairy View Post
    I find that DD still has tantrums and upon reading the information supplied by QAGCT I have been dealing with her outbursts differently and find that I am able to help calm her down, rather than giving her warnings and it ending up excalating with her in time out. Her rage excalates very fast and I have never understood just how she can be laughing and so happy one minute and completely filled with rage and anger the next... upon reading this -

    Difficulty making decisions. Gifted children, particularly if they’re divergent thinkers, may see so many sides of an issue, so many what-if’s and possible outcomes, that they become overwhelmed. Unable to manage the richness that floods their minds, unable to bear the contradictions and sense of loss about all the roads not taken, they’re unable to act. A child who can’t pick a dessert because she’s acutely aware of all the desserts she won’t be getting if she chooses apple pie – and who tantrums when adults urge her to hurry – may be seen as demanding and spoiled when her behavior is actually due to cognitive overload.
    This is DS1. He is such an intense, sensitive, emotional child.
    I really have to work on how I parent him to try and avoid meltdowns.
    He is currently completing an end of term project and the intensity he is putting into it is quite exhausting. He is a perfectionist as well which causes him to become easily disheartened and frustrated. The angst he showed when choosing the topic for the project was really quite sad! He was genuinely upset about all the "other" things he could have chosen!
    My friends call him the man-child! Lol.
    He asked me about politics in Europe the other day... : /

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    troopingfairy  (09-11-2012)

  9. #36
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    and of course, she has a lot of friends her own age at school, though easily gets frustrated with them and ends up getting angry quickly and has a melt down.. sadly, it usually results in others moving away from her and there are days when I pick her up from school and ask who she played with, only for her to tell me that she just 'walked around the oval on her own because no one wanted to play with her'... its so hard.. the last thing she wants to do is drive her friends away but she doesn't know why, what or how it is happening.

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    pinkdolly  (07-03-2013)

  11. #37
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    Trooping fairy I can relate.

  12. #38
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    The thing about this kind of assessment is that it can set up a kid to have over ambitious expectations of themselves, especially if their identity is formed around an idea of being bright. IQ testing in young children is not correlated with academic success. This is because we all peak at different rates and the bits of grey matter that control the kind of abilities you really need to succeed don't develop in your brain's structure til your early teens.

    These people explain it well in their book; http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...ing-craze.html

    As a former top 2% kid, I can say that being praised for your emotional, artistic, or social skills is just as important as your brains. Actually just being able to do clever stuff doesn't feel like an achievement. It's like being praised for being tall or pretty; its not something you have any control over. I know really hard working not especially brilliant people who are now excellent doctors and scientists. I always thought they deserved the prizes, for hard work and dedication. I swanned in with no prep and did as well and it meant nothing to me. It didn't make me a decent human being.

    My creative thinking talents mean I am bloody great at some things, but that doesn't make me organized or motivated. I'm lucky my university appreciates me for what I can do and overlooks my lack of follow through. But I originally left school at 16, as acceleration and being in a school of selected clever girls was still dull as ditchwater. I'm sending my children to schools which focus on enquiry based learning, in multi age classrooms and are strong in the arts, but most of all are fun. School engagement is your real challenge with clever kids, and you maintain that with social networks and extracurricular activities, not more challenging maths.

  13. #39
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    I only talk about my DS's giftedness with my close family and one or two friends.


 

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