View Poll Results: Who do you tell about your gifted child's achievements?

Voters
21. You may not vote on this poll
  • Immediate family only (childs parents/siblings)

    7 33.33%
  • Extended family only (childs grandparents/aunts/uncles)

    5 23.81%
  • Family & a few friends

    4 19.05%
  • Anyone who is in my childs life

    6 28.57%
  • Other

    3 14.29%
Multiple Choice Poll.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 41
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,765
    Thanks
    1,903
    Thanked
    2,790
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    It's interesting, DD isn't gifted but she is smart and does well at school. I still only talk about her achievements to family and close friends. I think as a society we generally feel uncomfortable talking about achievements full stop - I know that I was brought up believing that it was a huge no no to be "up myself".

  2. #22
    GluttonForPunishment's Avatar
    GluttonForPunishment is offline Bubhub Award Winner - 2011- Most Optimistic Poster and Newbie of the Year Awards
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,209
    Thanks
    466
    Thanked
    1,796
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I think you should just be proud of your kids in whatever they do well, regardless of what that is. An ex of mine and I had this discussion all the time. Our daughters were the same age which made things challenging. My DD was a fair bit better than her DD at school. But I always thought her DD had a kinder, more gently nature. I just looked at them as being different, whereas the ex was much more competitive with it and felt bad when I praised my DD.

    I think celebrate your childs success. If your child moves to level 18 reading when everyone else is on level 30, then celebrate that acheivement, because they've worked really hard at something that doesn't come easy to them. If everyone else is on level 30 and yours is on level 40, celebrate their ability to read really well. And if they're on level 30 like most everyone else, celebrate the hard work they've put in to get there.

    I would love to see hard work celebrated as much as intellegence, athleticism, looks etc. At the end of the day, it's that and how they treat others that really counts when they're adults. And no, this isn't coming from someone who's kid is behind - she topped her class and got straight A's. But I would be just as proud if she got straight C's. It's the hard work and her thoughtful nature that I'm proud of.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to GluttonForPunishment For This Useful Post:

    bumMum  (27-06-2012)

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,834
    Thanks
    564
    Thanked
    1,962
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Ohh I think you should shout it all over facebook.
    My kids are not gifted but my son is really good at soccer and plays at state level..
    I am so proud and I update people about it.

    It doesnt mean I think their kids are not good, just that I am so proud of mine.

    I have a friend who has a gifted child and she posts updates...have never thought she was being rude..
    she will write things like,

    John and I are so proud that Mikey got into the gifted program he really is an amazing little boy and we are so glad he has the support to explore all that he wants and needs too!

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Batemans Bay NSW
    Posts
    31
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Anyone I will tell that asks about my son. It's something to be proud of. I tell him it's a great thing all the time. I did teach him though not to brag about it so much to friends but help his friends to one day get to his level instead as he was bragging mean about it. But I'll always be proud and tell people. I've never had anyone say bad about me being proud of it. They say how great it is!

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    700
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked
    65
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Recently we had DD IQ tested. The test results revealed she is sitting in the very superior range. She is 7. This years teacher has been telling us that she misbehaves in class and when we asked what they were doing in regards to offering her more stimulating school work, she simply said that she thinks DD is smart, but not gifted, going off one exercise she had the class do, which was writing two pairs of letters together eg "ae" and "ee" from words.. The children had to guess which set of letters were in words by the sound.

    The school suggested if we were not happy to have her tested for her IQ, at least then they would have something to go by.

    We got the final results this week and I am really the proudest person right now.. But again, we are faced with options that could be very real at the beginning of next year for her.. The school may suggest either keeping her in her own year level next year and supply her with work from the grade above, or they may consider moving her up a grade..

    I am wondering if this has happened with anyone here or your children? If they moved up a class, did they cope emotionally? As she is very sensitive and although I think she can adjust easily enough, I guess I'm just curious to see how other children went..

    Also, Ive been trying to research different ways to approach her with tantrums as she has these out of frustration. I am only guessing it is because sometimes I am not giving her enough stimulation myself at home.. Any advice? She will cry over simple things also she is very sensitive.. Like she will be at her father's for Xmas Day and my DH said last night that we won't put the tree up unless DD and DSS are here to help.. She burst into tears immediately because she thought he meant we weren't putting the tree up.. It happened faster than even I could even process!

    How do you handle the super-sensitivities? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    26,930
    Thanks
    2,736
    Thanked
    6,743
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Troopingfairy, DD's principal and teacher wanted to move her up a grade level last year. They asked me for the okay, which I gave, as I knew she was doing well beyond the work they could offer a prep student, but they sent her to the student counsellor for an assessment on the matter, and he said that basically, he'd never okay it (unless the kid was so genius he was a member of MENSA) because the social aspect of schooling is so very important to little ones... and said that while DD might excell academically, she might fall behind socially.

    So she's simply remained in the grade for her age-bracket, but spends time in higher grade classrooms and gets additional and more challenging work.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    700
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked
    65
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    We are in the process of applying for membership into MENSA for her now as she is sitting within the top 2%.
    thanks for your feedback! We don't know anyone else experiencing this with their child/ren so it's good to hear how others are handling it!!

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Point Cook
    Posts
    985
    Thanks
    136
    Thanked
    468
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Re: Do you keep quiet about your gifted child?

    The problem is that intelligence is hard to quantify.
    In sports, if a child is gifted they win competitions. It is easily quantified. Intelligence is so much harder to 'rank'.
    My daughter is highly intelligent, though I wouldn't call her gifted. She taught herself to read before starting school. When ppl ask me about her reading they always insinuate that I pushed her to read, when it couldn't be further from the truth (thank god for reading eggs is all I can say, cause I have no idea on how to teach reading). Because of these past conversations I have trouble telling anyone how good she is doing.

    Sent from my U8860 using BubHub

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mrsdj1234 For This Useful Post:

    BH-KatiesMum  (08-11-2012),troopingfairy  (08-11-2012)

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,892
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by mrsdj1234 View Post
    My daughter is highly intelligent, though I wouldn't call her gifted. She taught herself to read before starting school. When ppl ask me about her reading they always insinuate that I pushed her to read, when it couldn't be further from the truth (thank god for reading eggs is all I can say, cause I have no idea on how to teach reading). Because of these past conversations I have trouble telling anyone how good she is doing.

    Sent from my U8860 using BubHub
    We've been thru that with DD too. We just keep quiet now.

    As to skipping grades. I never did Year 7, I went from year 6 to 8 and handled it well, but it doesn't seem to be the done thing in public schools. Instead DD is in the accelated program, has her own set of spelling and reading, and moved in the class above her every day for maths. So in her school, giftedness is def fostered, but by individualising her learning rather than jumping her a grade. Honestly I would like to see her jumped. She finds the work too easy and is more grown up than her peers. having said that she has lots of friends and fits in well.

  12. #30
    BH-KatiesMum's Avatar
    BH-KatiesMum is offline Community Manager
    Winner 2008 - The most optimistic poster
    Winner 2014 - Most Helpful Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Perth WA
    Posts
    22,393
    Thanks
    5,359
    Thanked
    5,806
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator
    200 Posts in a week100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by mrsdj1234 View Post
    The problem is that intelligence is hard to quantify.
    In sports, if a child is gifted they win competitions. It is easily quantified. Intelligence is so much harder to 'rank'.
    My daughter is highly intelligent, though I wouldn't call her gifted. She taught herself to read before starting school. When ppl ask me about her reading they always insinuate that I pushed her to read, when it couldn't be further from the truth (thank god for reading eggs is all I can say, cause I have no idea on how to teach reading). Because of these past conversations I have trouble telling anyone how good she is doing.

    Sent from my U8860 using BubHub
    pretty much the same in our household.

    I dont think DD is gifted ... but she is highly intellegent and motivated - she genuinely likes reading, schoolwork and is very inquisitive so enjoys learning about new things.

    School did tentatively suggest moving her up a grade (skipping grade 1) but in meeting with the teacher DH and I decided definitely not. She is already the youngest in the class and moving her up a grade would be really bad socially I think.

    this year in grade 1 she has done so well. Her teacher is fantastic and does extend her, gives her extra stuff to do, extra books (she gets books from the library instead of readers) and projects to do.

    The school does not actually have an extension program for the lower primary grades - basically they are just assessed and extended by the classroom teacher - but it seems to work well (so far anyway)

    I am proud of her though, and I do tell her that.

    She is not that athletic though, so we have regular talks about how everyone has different gifts and talents, and other kids are great at sport but arent as good at reading as her etc. Its a fine balancing act though


 

Similar Threads

  1. What makes a child gifted?
    By Renesme in forum General Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26-11-2012, 15:23
  2. How to be quiet when all's quiet?:)
    By Irinko in forum First Trimester Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-11-2012, 23:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pebblebee
Parents spend hours looking for things they need NOW. The keys, the remote, darling daughter's treasured teddy. Stop wasting precious time looking & start finding with Bub Hub reviewed Pebblebee Smart Tag. Simply attach a Pebblebee and find it fast.
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
Billington Street
For stationery as unique as you are! ♥ Handmade, custom designed stationery for all of life's celebrations
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!