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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lovemyfam View Post
    Yes I think it should be also would not feel comfortable of I knew someone at my kids daycare was bi-polar etc we as Humana and medication can only control things so much
    You know what.....I actually feel sad for you and sad for your children that because of preconceived fear and ignorance, you could possibly miss out of meeting genuine and loving people, not only your life, but your childrens as well.

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  3. #32
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    It comes as no surprise that there are varying opinions in this thread, since that is exactly what happens out there in the real world.

    Many people think that being diagnosed with a mental illness means that you're a stereotypical 'crazy' person, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

    I know many people effected by mental illness of different types. Some it's a simple chemical balance that can be successfully treated with medication. Some can't find the meds, and some are simply compasionate.

    Too much compassion means it's harder to process the atrrocities in the world, and sometimes when you're dealing with raw and tired people you see so much.
    It's those compasionate people I'd prefer to see dealing with my son, rather than a clinical person who knows what the textbook indicates he should be doing for his age.

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  5. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I do. Two of my sisters have bipolar, both in control, both are nurses. One is more in tune with it than the other. Both are medicated and aware of and experience the up and down cycle. My sister who is more in tune with her condition can recognise when she is about to hit a low and tells her employer she needs to take leave and they are very understanding.

    Having said this, I do not believe that anyone should be discriminated against because of it.
    I agree with this. My have 2 friends with bipolar who are medicated and still have their down periods.

  6. #34
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    When I was 17 and doing placement in a childcare centre, a diploma qualified worker with 3 kids of her own came in, started her day as normal, then suddenly snapped. She was changing nappies and next thing I know she was crying and shaking a baby. Her youngest who was not yet 1 was having his nappy changed and was crying. Babies and toddlers had a shared bathroom and kitchen. After she was taken into the office and her baby was taken to his room with his own staff, it came out that her 3yo was awake until after midnight, the baby cried most of the night and went to sleep at 3am in her bed, then her 5yo was up before 5 and was tired and cranky and whingy. On top of that, her husband left her a few days earlier which she had not told anyone about. In the end, she stopped work, had a year home with the kids then opened up fdc. It was pretty freaky to witness as a 17yo just entering the field, but it shows that people can snap. Other factors influence mood. She got her life back on track and still does fdc and is in high demand. That was early 1998.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lovemyfam View Post
    Yes I think it should be also would not feel comfortable of I knew someone at my kids daycare was bi-polar etc we as Humana and medication can only control things so much
    I agree. Being a small town where we live there were many parents including myself objecting to a person who had mental issues and had applied and was successful in getting a job at the daycare centre. But she also mixed drugs and alcohol into the equation, it was local knowledge in town that she was very unstable. She would not take her meds at times and do stints at a mental hospital and it was a repeated cycle. She didn't get a start at the centre in the end.

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  9. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Izy View Post
    It comes as no surprise that there are varying opinions in this thread, since that is exactly what happens out there in the real world.

    Many people think that being diagnosed with a mental illness means that you're a stereotypical 'crazy' person, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

    I know many people effected by mental illness of different types. Some it's a simple chemical balance that can be successfully treated with medication. Some can't find the meds, and some are simply compasionate.

    Too much compassion means it's harder to process the atrrocities in the world, and sometimes when you're dealing with raw and tired people you see so much.
    It's those compasionate people I'd prefer to see dealing with my son, rather than a clinical person who knows what the textbook indicates he should be doing for his age.
    I agree. That was a beautiful post

  10. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    ]

    I agree. Being a small town where we live there were many parents including myself objecting to a person who had mental issues and had applied and was successful in getting a job at the daycare centre. But she also mixed drugs and alcohol into the equation, it was local knowledge in town that she was very unstable. She would not take her meds at times and do stints at a mental hospital and it was a repeated cycle. She didn't get a start at the centre in the end.
    Disclosure wasn't needed in this instance, sounds as though the 'small town' had that already sorted for her.

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  12. #38
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    inkognito is offline Moving on is simple, its what you leave behind which makes it hard
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    Quote Originally Posted by SassyMummy View Post
    There are some jobs that require a medical, and I think those are the jobs that probably want to know these things... but not every single job one might apply for should be required to know.

    I know that my anxiety won't change my work as am employee. It makes it hard for me to talk to people, but for some reason, in a working environment, I find it quite easy to talk to customers/clients. It's different to me just socialising at a party or something (which is where I feel quite uncomfortable).

    It's unlikely my anxiety would have any impact on my ability to work. Other things in my life are more likely to have an impact on my work than my mental illness. If I felt that disclosing my MI to my employer would make my life easier, then I would... but I see no point in telling anyone, and only see it as a potential risk, not a potential benefit to anyone.
    This....

    My mental illness has never affected my ability to do my job as well as if not better than my co workers, for me my mental health has if anything made me a more diligent worker, It has made me stronger and I am better able to work through fairly difficult situations as I am able to apply the coping strategies I have learnt from suffering with mental illness.
    personally I have no problem disclosing my mental health if I feel it is necessary but only because I think the stigma needs to be removed, and if we keep hiding in the closet so to speak how will we ever get rid of the stigma

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    See, if someone has a drug and alcohol problem that they're taking to work with them, I suspect THAT is the issue, not the mental illness itself. Take away the drugs and alcohol, and there probably wasn't an real issue.

    I can think of a million things that could prevent me from being a good employee - and having anxiety is right near the bottom of that list. It simply would not and does not prevent me from being able to care for other people.

    "Mental Illness," is not a blanket thing either. Just because there is someone out there who snapped and went on a killing spree thanks to suffering from some sort of mental illness, doesn't mean that everyone else with a mental illness will ever come close to doing the same thing. There are different types, different reasons for those illnesses, etc. It can't be talked about like it's just one thing which effects everyone the same way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    ]

    I agree. Being a small town where we live there were many parents including myself objecting to a person who had mental issues and had applied and was successful in getting a job at the daycare centre. But she also mixed drugs and alcohol into the equation, it was local knowledge in town that she was very unstable. She would not take her meds at times and do stints at a mental hospital and it was a repeated cycle. She didn't get a start at the centre in the end.
    So someone has a drug problem, an alcohol problem, and *uncontrolled* mental illness, but the mental illness is the problem? And townfolk can interfere with the employment opportunities of this person? Was anyone giving this person support at all? That poor woman must have felt so alone and worried


 

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