+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    89
    Thanks
    474
    Thanked
    19
    Reviews
    0
    We've had similar issues in the past - their little teeth are so sharp and they're so used to playing rough with their litter mates so it def takes a little bit of time and consistent training to help themn understand how to behave within their pack. Jan Fennel's book 'The Dog Listener' has made a huge difference to us. It helps you to understand how to be the leader of your pack etc. If you google her there should be some good ideas etc to try too. If I can find the list of websites I found when I was looking, I'll come back and post them

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Launceston
    Posts
    13,466
    Thanks
    732
    Thanked
    2,355
    Reviews
    35
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Thank you so much for all the advice I really appreciate it. I understand what you were trying to say bec

    We won't be smacking or even pinching the neck. I know she is an animal but I just couldn't do something to another being, it's not my thing.

    I really appreciate all the advice. This morning I decided to use a very deep stern voice with her and she improved somewhat. I am her favorite so she listens to me more so then DH but she doesn't misbehave for him. They fall asleep in his study together all the time. Lol. I'm clearly the favorite but she clearly respects DH as the leader over me

  3. #13
    Rutabaga's Avatar
    Rutabaga is offline Getting it together, one day at a time.
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Rural Darwin
    Posts
    810
    Thanks
    1,594
    Thanked
    295
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I have a 13 week old english staffy and she's biting a lot too! I've been gently holding her mouth closed and saying no. Is this alright, it seemed to work with our other dogs, but I don't want to do the wrong thing with her. I hate smacking them, cos they start fliching no matter how gently I do it. I know she's only getting carried away cos she's so sociable and happy to be with us, and I don't want to punish her for that.
    Macy also jumps onto our legs while we're walking, what do I do for that?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    82
    Thanked
    104
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Dog Whisperer dvd's are brilliant! Definitely watch them. I used it and still do for my male 40kg American Staffy. He's not desexed either. Fantastic for learning a calm approach to building a healthy relationship with your dog. My dog pays more attention to me as pack leader than DP. Its great!!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7,160
    Thanks
    1,701
    Thanked
    3,395
    Reviews
    4
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Becclesm.... Didn't think you were advocating hard smacks! I don't think anyone would!?! I hope. Just remember seeing something on dog whisperer about it.

    I live by what the dig whisperer says! We adopted a dog from AWL last year. I watched every episode and I totally think it made all the difference to how I treated our dog.

    Water lily..., there's also an episode where he shows how to train your puppies. And he uses a Labrador to do it. Among others. Google it online or something?!? It might be helpful in you establishing yourself as a pack leader. (that is if you ascribe to his thinking, I know lots who don't. But I think he's awesome!)

  6. #16
    Eko's Avatar
    Eko is offline Acrobatic Dominatrix.
    Winner 2012 - Most Politically Correct Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,837
    Thanks
    1,083
    Thanked
    1,427
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I used to love watching cesar milan's show. He taps the dog with his fingers shaped like a claw. Literally as lightly as you would drum your fingers on a desk. Doesn't hurt the dog in the slightest and works to distract them, and they think that it's a dominant animal nipping them because of the claw shape. Which is what a dominant dog would do in a pack, reprimand without pain with a nip.
    I mentioned this to a military working dog handler and he said it's common practice for training because it doesn't hurt them at all and it helps them to understand because you're using dog speak, not human speak. And I've never seen people with better relationships and respect for their dogs than mwdh. They view injuring dogs pretty much the same way that they would injuring children so they would hurt themselves before their dogs!

    Sent from my GT-I9100T using BubHub

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,378
    Thanks
    829
    Thanked
    1,106
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    An alternative way to look at Caeser Millan's methods of training is discussed in this article.

    http://www.livescience.com/5846-critics-challenge-dog-whisperer-methods.html


    I must say that I love watching his show too, but I don't think the training techniques he employs are necessary/suitable for the family puppy who is just learning how to behave.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    First thing - please remember that she's just a baby! It's your job as a puppy parent to teach her how to behave nicely, much the same as you would a two year old. It will take time and patience, but the reward is a lovely, well-mannered dog who is a joy to be around and to take out as well.

    The best thing to do for puppy biting is the dying puppy squeal - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tIExGIwFKg. Yep, that one. Long and loud, until puppy lets go. Re-direct to an appropriate chew toy, and praise, praise, praise for chewing the right thing. And please never hit/tap your dog's nose. They don't understand the action, and worst case scenario it may result in a fear reaction, which is detrimental for everyone involved!

    I'd also avoid keeping her outside for long periods if you can, which I know is really hard when she's chewy. She's likely to be much, much more excited coming inside after being outside for a period of time, which in turn will make the biting worse.

    One thing we were taught at dog school (right from puppy school to CGC) was to not tell your dog 'no'. Sound hard? It is, but there's method in the madness! Dogs don't understand English (obviously), they only associate an action with a sound/signal - sit, drop, wait, come etc. Imagine you say 'no' to your dog when they jump on the couch and you want them to get off, no when they're jumping up while you're walking, no when they're running away with your favourite shoe in their mouth, no when they're biting, no when they're eating something they shouldn't be. The word all of a sudden takes on many different meanings, and the poor dog gets confused as to what they should/shouldn't be doing - after all, they're not mind readers! Instead, sit down with your family and work out a list of 'commands' that you want to use for your dog, and make it consistent with all family members. Eg 'off' for dog jumping on couch (and getting off), 'down' if they jump while walking, 'come' and 'give' if they run off with your shoe, 'give' or 'leave' if they're eating/interested in something they shouldn't be (straining on the leash etc). As soon as they've done the desired behaviour (jumped off of the couch, dropped your shoe etc), praise, praise, praise!

    We've had a lot of success with our two dogs (GSD and Elkhound, who is a severely abused rescue) using clicker training. We don't use an actual clicker, we use 'Yesss' as the marker - much more portable and easier to time. Have a look at Karen Pryor's books/youtube videos if you want to know more. It's also an extremely good idea to look into crate training. I have some excellent resources, however am not sure if I can link on here due to them being on another forum.

    Please feel free to PM me if you'd like some more info/links

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    93
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    We have a Lab that went through the same thing. We made sure we always had a chew toy nearby and gave him that everytime. If we happened to be out of reach of a toy we did a stern Ah! Which our breeder had suggested. I think it took a couple of weeks but he stopped. Consistency is the key with Labs I've found.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Country WA
    Posts
    6,644
    Thanks
    3,135
    Thanked
    3,028
    Reviews
    13
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    We have a Border Collie who did the same when she was a pup. I look at it that they are like babies and put everything in their mouth! But it does hurt - puppy teeth and claws are as sharp as razor blades!!

    I used to put my hand in front of her face (to say stop) and say "no, no biting" loudly and gruffly if she was biting really hard. If she was just nibbling, I would make a big deal out of going "ow" and let her know it hurt me and I would stop playing with her for a few minutes so she could calm down. She didn't like hurting me, so that worked most of the time.

    A few times I did tap her snout (not the actual nose pad) with one finger, but that was mainly when she had a good hold on me and was over excited and drawing blood. It got her attention and then I would do the whole no thing.

    And definitely do puppy classes. We did with ours and she is so well behaved (most of the time!) and is an excellent playmate for DS. I think a lot of that is her personality (she's so laid back and cruisy), but training is also important for them and is great for their socialisation skills as well.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-09-2012, 15:37
  2. desperate for help - advice needed please!
    By ziara in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-07-2012, 17:53
  3. Desperate sleep help needed!!!!
    By MarkandSandy in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-12-2011, 15:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
CarmelsBeautySecrets
Growing your own natural nails is easy. Years ago, I devised a simple and very effective technique which really helps boosts the nails' growth in as little as three days! And most importantly keeps them that way.
featured supporter
Pea Pods Reusable Nappies
Pea Pods are the smart choice when it comes to choosing what's best for you, your baby and the environment. Affordable and simple to use, Pea Pods keep your baby dry & happy. Visit our website to find your nearest stockist or order online.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!