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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloppykissesmonsterhugs View Post
    This thread reminds me of three things that always surprised me as a teacher:

    1/ That the smallest of oversights somehow had the potential eclipse all of the effort and thought I applied to each child each day

    2/That parents often admitted to struggling to keep up with 1/2/3 children, and arrived late/turned up without lunch/sent to school without sport uniform etc and understanding was expected. However, when the roles were reversed (where the responsibility was x 20 plus students) little understanding was shown.

    3/That events that caused upset were not always raised with me. As reliable as young children are, they don't always explain an event accurately or have all of the facts at hand.
    Totally agree. Especially point 2.

    I love teachers, most of you do your best, and it world be very hard considering that every child is someone's special little prince/princess that needs to he treated a certain way. Meh, you don't do laces. Well, as long as you're teaching them to read, write and understand the world, then I'm pretty happy.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloppykissesmonsterhugs View Post
    This thread reminds me of three things that always surprised me as a teacher:

    1/ That the smallest of oversights somehow had the potential eclipse all of the effort and thought I applied to each child each day

    2/That parents often admitted to struggling to keep up with 1/2/3 children, and arrived late/turned up without lunch/sent to school without sport uniform etc and understanding was expected. However, when the roles were reversed (where the responsibility was x 20 plus students) little understanding was shown.

    3/That events that caused upset were not always raised with me. As reliable as young children are, they don't always explain an event accurately or have all of the facts at hand.
    Very good points.

    I also agree that it isn't a teacher's job to do this - especially if laces aren't required as part of uniform.

    Sure, it takes no time to do one lace once, but it takes a lot of time to do a class of then throughout the day.

    I don't think teachers should be held responsible for teaching all physical care type things. Otherwise where do you draw the line? Toilet training, sleep, dressing, etc.? I'd suggest giving them velcro and teaching laces at home, and then moving to lace shoes when they can do it.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub

  3. #33
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    I'm a early childhood teacher. I of course have to do all laces as maybe one child in my preschool room will learn how to do laces during the year before they go to school. I've never thought about the germs on laces and since at that age bathrooms are unisex communal I think boys and girls laces would be the same. But I normally go wash my hands straight after doing laces.

  4. #34
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    Interesting.

    So what I can gather is that some teachers wont tie boys shoes because of wee so I would assume they would happily tie girls shoelaces then?

    I understand that teachers are there to teach and not teach the children how to dress themselves but if a child who is obviously struggling to tie his shoes and asks for help I believe should be given help.

    It just seems that its okay then that a child then can trip on his laces, fall over and potiontially do serious damage to himself? That I dont understand.

    Oh and my DS school is velcro free. They HAVE to wear laces and I am trying to teach him....its just that he isnt very good at it.

    I get that teachers are busy....I get that they need to look after 25 kids in a class...and I dont expect my "prince or princess" be treated a certain way as a pp so nicely pointed out.

    My DS asked for help...he was told that his parents should teach him to tie his shoes and left to walk around school all day with a tripping hazard. Now he is scared to ask his teacher to help him.

    Just seems a bit sad to me.
    Last edited by FluffyDucks; 29-02-2012 at 07:41.

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    Ok sorry I was being a bit tongue in cheek about the wee in your hands. But seriously, what do you do when a child has a toileting accident?

    I also don't expect my child to be treated like a princess but some basic human respect I do expect. And leaving a child too scared to ask for help is a no no.

    I'm not talking about those of you who do the whole buddy system in a respectful way. More the teacher in question in the OP

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    twotrunks  (29-02-2012)

  8. #36
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    bellalika is offline I'm trying my hardest, please don't ask for more.
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    I think a lot of us teachers are being misquoted. Most of us have said that we *will* tie laces but *prefer* not to and *encourage* peer based learning. Other than the OP I can't see a single teacher that refuses to tie laces yet many are implying that is what we did say.

    Sorry, but it irritates the crap out of me when everyone jumps on the "hang sh*t on the teacher" bandwagon without reading carefully. Personal vent over.

    (4under4, I was typing while you posted. Sorry.)

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    If the teacher doesn't want wee on their hands why would the classmates?
    the ops teachs was clearly out of line, and should have helped.

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    I think that if she didn't want to tie laces then showing him how to tuck the laces in could have been good.

    But as PP said, none of us were there. She could have been very frazzled/ busy and not paid attention, which I think happens to us all at times - especially if you have lots of children to look after!

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    With my DD, her Kindy teacher willingly helped the parents by having an exercise in class where they had a shoe box that they tied up, then they practised at home. She also helped the children when they came undone throughout the day. DD was able to tie her laces by 3/4 of the way through Kindy.

    On the other hand, the daughter of a family friend who is in Yr4 this year is unable to tie laces. She refuses to learn or try to learn, insists on her Dad on buying expensive shoes (joggers) only to destroy them by never taking them off properly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4underfour View Post
    Ok sorry I was being a bit tongue in cheek about the wee in your hands. But seriously, what do you do when a child has a toileting accident?
    My DD5 had problems with bowel leakage, and thus frequently had toileting accidents. Because it was a problem we had been dealing with since she was 2yo, I had taught her how to clean herself up and shower herself.

    However, the school wouldn't accept that. In year 1, whenever she soiled herself, they would ring me to come supervise her cleaning herself up. Then they made her wait until I got there - which was a 45 minute drive. I was most annoyed. Why would they make a child sit in it for 45 minutes instead of allowing her to clean herself up. (Note also this typically occurred three times a week until she finally got to see a specialist.)


 

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