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  1. #11
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    I think its definitely the lack of education that leads to the ignorance of some people when it comes to mental health/disabilities. I have worked in mental health/ disabilities for over 10 years and it still shocks me when people openly say such ignorant things.

  2. #12
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    I have spoken many a times on bubhub about the fact that I have bipolar. I am working towards changing the stigma that mental illness has attached to it.

    I'm on a government commitee this year to change it.

    I have now been hospitilised 9 times for bipolar, its not fun to be in there and have no one visit you.People think that it is something you can change like its a choice.Its not. Bipolar is a chemical imbalance in the brain.The medication that bipolar patients take are mood stabilisers, it helps our brain to know what chemical to release ,how much and when as our brain does not have the ability to do this.

    I have had varied reactions from people when they find out that I have bipolar. I am such a strong person that when I tell people I have bipolar I have no problem if they no longer wish to associate with me as its a reflection on them and not me.

    Mental illness will not go away no matter how much people try to sweep it under the rug, oh and don't even get me started on the mental institutions, were not criminals

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    sweetseven  (26-02-2012)

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fichicken View Post
    I have spoken many a times on bubhub about the fact that I have bipolar. I am working towards changing the stigma that mental illness has attached to it.

    I'm on a government commitee this year to change it.

    I have now been hospitilised 9 times for bipolar, its not fun to be in there and have no one visit you.People think that it is something you can change like its a choice.Its not. Bipolar is a chemical imbalance in the brain.The medication that bipolar patients take are mood stabilisers, it helps our brain to know what chemical to release ,how much and when as our brain does not have the ability to do this.

    I have had varied reactions from people when they find out that I have bipolar. I am such a strong person that when I tell people I have bipolar I have no problem if they no longer wish to associate with me as its a reflection on them and not me.

    Mental illness will not go away no matter how much people try to sweep it under the rug, oh and don't even get me started on the mental institutions, were not criminals
    I have nothing useful to say but I just wanted to congratulate you on such a great attitude and outlook on things.

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    fichicken  (26-02-2012)

  6. #14
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    I have: PND, depression, anxiety, panic disorder, sociophobia, mild agoraphobia and a family history of bipolar. I have been medicated and unmedicated on and off since 2008.

    When I was first diagnosed with panic disorder/sociophobia, my own mother (who has bipolar!) said I was lying and that it wasn't a real illness, and was just an excuse to stay home all day. Never mind that even the thought of going in to social situations would send me in to collapsing panic attacks, it was "all in my head" and an "excuse to to be anti-social".

    Before it got bad enough that I /couldn't/ ignore it anymore, I had been in Scouts, did dance and bowling, and was studying to be a teacher. I was, if not a social butterfly, at least able to make friends pretty easily. Now I can't even make eye contact until the third time I meet someone, and meeting new people, no matter how short the meeting is, can send me into a panic attack that wipes me out for the rest of the day.

    My DD goes to daycare so she gets social interaction, because while unmedicated due to pregnancy, there is NO way I could go to mothers groups or whatever. I hate the 'but you seem fine' comments I get when I tell people.

    My mum actually witnessed a panic attack and no longer says I'm faking, but I hate that she had to have physical proof. My husband is pretty much the only one that supports me without question, well, him and my panic disorder support group on Facebook.

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    sweetseven  (26-02-2012)

  8. #15
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    Agree with what everyone else has said re: ignorance and fear.

    My grandma has been hospitalised at a secure facility for a couple of years now due to severe depression. When I told people I was taking my newborn DS to go see her (being her first great-grandchild) quite a few people said "Ohhh... Do you think that is safe?". I was a bit bewildered by that reaction TBH!

    The same hospital has a PND mother and baby wing where a good friend of mine spent some months recently and she was very honest and open about it. A few of our friends questioned whether she really needed to be there because she didn't seem "that bad". No one sees what happens behind closed doors

  9. #16
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    Don't know what drives peoples opinions. Just know they tend to never change them especially when it comes to mental health!

    I worked my *** off from being told I would never be a functioning member of society signed over from my parents care to a be ward of the state to now being a mother working full time paying off a mortgage and being married to a fantastic man.

    But stuff that every time I get upset about something I will still be called a psycho b*tch, everytime I get into a fight with family they will still threaten to have my boy removed from my care and everytime I make a friend they will eventually ignore me because my previous sucide attempts are pretty obvious.


  10. #17
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    I work in mental health and I would say most of the stigma comes from fear and ignorance. I don't think I have ever seen someone bring flowers onto a psych ward. Really sad. The media still use mental illness to sell newspapers too and that fuels fear. I always have people comment about my work and ask if I am scared of my clients. Umm, no just because people are unwell doesn't mean that they are violent- its more likely that if they were violent they would take that violence out on themselves. I have more reason for concern walking through a pub after 10pm at night where people have been drinking.

    I had a marketing manager recently say to me that I should think about changing the name of my courses as there is a lot of stigma around mental illness and it might put people off signing up to do them! She then suggested I use the word 'stress' because its far more acceptable. Idiot.
    There's this and then there's the social conditioning aspect of mental illness in that we are taught that it's permanent, violent, usually results in someone being killed (especially if it's being represented in a movie, complete with hockey mask) and that you can treat it but you can't cure it and that it will always be on your medical record so never tell your GP that you're depressed.

    Let's just say that an earlier point of view I held is being challenged by a completely unexpected learning curve.

  11. #18
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    I had a friend stay in a mental health ward a few months ago because she was suicidal. I had asked a friend to go visit her and her reply was "but I'm scared. I don't want to be see all those people and be there." She thought that she'd see people rocking back and forth in a corner or trying to take chunks out of her.
    People don't bother researching or learning. They assume that depression=bunch of whingers, bipolar= uncontrollable crazy person etc. etc. It's so stupid.
    I suffer from PND and I made it a mission to get it out there and talk to people about it, but you know what? People ignore it. My family didn't want to talk about it, instead they found it easier to ignore it. I really don't understand why there's such argue stigma attached to it.


 

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