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  1. #21
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    I'm more scared of the needle in the spine for an epi than anything else. It is my greatest fear to have that needle!!

  2. #22
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    I had an epi with my 1st which ended in an emergency cesaer.
    I chose completely drug free with my 2nd (no gas, peth or epi). I planned to do drug free so I was prepared for it, and I chose it because my 1st experience with the drugs was horrible, a failed epidural + c/s and then I was allergic to the morphine I had after my c/s, disaster! I wanted to avoid it all and thankfully I had a 5hour (but intense) labour and then only had panadol afterwards.
    I can honestly say the recovery was so much better without drugs, I wasn't so spaced out, I could get up straight away, no pain in my back thanks to the epi, even my afterbirth pains weren't as bad as the first time.
    It's totally up to you, I think to go drug free you have to be determined because the pain gets pretty itense and its tempting when you're actually in labour. But look, if my 1st experience was a good epi and a vb with no probs, I'd probably have it again, unfortunately I was an unlucky few that it didn't work for.

  3. #23
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    I haven't read all the other replies, but thought I'd weigh in with my opinion. I think that having a drug-free birth is like running a marathon, you don't just rock up and have a crack without doing some training. For birth, you need to have your mind in the right spot, I had a twelve hour labour and did it completely drug free. I credit that to having my mind in such an amazing place, I practices relaxation techniques and used information that I learned in my calmbirth course.

    It may not be the same for everyone, and it may not even be the same for me when I have my next baby, but I truly had a pain free birth (except for the pushing part, that hurt a fair bit) without drugs.

  4. #24
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    I don't know how or why, but for my 3rd birth, I got to 10cm painlessly, but then OMG!! Hard and fast after that!

  5. #25
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    I agree with what a few other people have said - that if you want to go drug free you have to be really determined to do it, and you have to prepare by doing some research and having some strategies to deal with the pain of contractions. I've had 2 drug free births. The first was about 14 hours, the 2nd was very quick and very intense (about 45 minutes, though I think I slept through the first bit of the labour!). Both times I used the same strategies to get me through the contractions. These were things like breathing, relaxation, vocalising, movement and squeezing a squishy ball! It worked for me. Yes the contractions get painful, but you get a break in between (until near the end when they're very close together). Personally I didn't find the pushing stage painful as such, just a feeling of pressure and really hard work. I didn't tear at all either time. Afterwards the pain is all gone and you have a beautiful baby! Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

    A book that I found really useful was Birth Skills by Juju Sundin. Lots of strategies for dealing with the pain like the ones I mentioned above.

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    I am reading Juju's book now and I think I will take some of those ideas in with me- I am keen to avoid side affects from drugs for me and bubs.

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    Will definitely be doing my next one drug free. I only had gas for my first one (induction which ended up emergency c/section) and I won't even have that because last time it made me feel so light headed and sick. I found the best thing was to just bite down on the hose and squeeze a tennis ball in my hand lol.
    Yeah definitely no drugs for me!
    Last edited by brooke88(mum2b09); 17-02-2012 at 16:35.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MumDadBoyandGirl View Post
    I'm more scared of the needle in the spine for an epi than anything else. It is my greatest fear to have that needle!!
    Like most things get a skilled anaesthetist and you don't feel it at all

    drug side effects are so dependant on the individual I had no side effects so would take them again ever time but when you do an elective c/s its a case of bring on the drugs

  9. #29
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    I'll start by saying one thing first. Go with what your gut tells you. If you don't think you can do the whole thing without it then don't push yourself to do so just because someone else thinks you should. It's your pregnancy, and your birth. YOU'RE the one that lives with it until the end of your days!

    That being said, I did most of my labour with no painkillers AT ALL. Not even gas. Being painkiller resistant meant that there was nothing those would achieve apart from making me nauseous. I got to the last hour of it, and they offered me the epi I'd told them I wanted in my birth plan.

    Pros (for me):
    New woman.
    Able to enjoy the fact that my bub was coming.
    Able to calm hubby (who was white as a sheet and horrified at the fact that I kept having my eyes roll back in my head whilst trying to pass out in the non-existant gaps in my back to back contractions) and convince him that I wasn't actually dying.
    Able to convince MYSELF that I wasn't actually dying .

    Cons:
    Bub went into shock and was born by emergency c-section. The epi was most likely the biggest factor.
    I didn't get to see my bub for the first 24 hours after he was born because I was too doped up to (and this is going to sound awful) be bothered with him, and didn't have the energy to demand that they take me to see him. The middies fed him with a bottle without asking my wishes on it so he was one of those stubborn bubs that wouldn't BF because a bottle was so much easier. Had I had him with me straight away, there would have been less chance of that happening.

    The cons are large, I'll admit. But everyone's birth experience is different, and the labour I went through last time was enough to convince me that the next one is a guaranteed elective c-section. Some people may think I'm a wuss or not a good mum because of it. Frankly, I don't give a rats what they think. They're not my problem. My memory and what I have to live with are my problem, and I try to keep it that way

  10. #30
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    I figured I'd put my 2 cents worth in.

    I had a completely drug free birth with dd, my first. I laboured at home, went about my day, went shopping, went and picked up the laybys, all while having contractions. I found that I had absolutely no pain between contractions, so I just thought about that. A minute or 2 of pain, then I was fine until the next contraction.

    I went into hospital when I was having contractions so powerful they made me sit on the floor. Needless to say, I was fully dialated and dd was born just after I arrived at hospital. I didn't do any preparation like hypnobirthing or anything, but I do believe in my body and its ability to do what it was designed to do. I think that the best thing I did was not focus on the pain, I just knew the pain would stop as soon as the contractions stopped. And once baby is out, no more contraction pain.

    That's just me and my experience though. I wish someone had told me before dd was born that there was no pain at all in between contractions. Once I realised that, I was able to relax and go with it. So now I tell anyone who'll listen. And even those who won't!


 

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