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  1. #11
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    Yeah I think prepping him about the behaviour that is expected is a good idea. Also the repercussion of inappropriate behaviour is a good idea too. Then he will know what is expected of him. Mine is also such a gorgeous child till she is tired or digging her heals in! You sound like a great mum, it's hard to think in stressful situations.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CluckySC View Post

    Perhaps I should prep before the play centre "ie this is the behavior I expect from you or we leave" so that threat doesn't arise mid tantrum.
    Yup, definitely. A few months ago DD was being a nightmare about leaving playgroup when it finished up and I pre warned her the next time before we went that we wouldn't go again if she couldn't leave happily, she had another tantrum that day so we didn't go next week - some might not agree with this but the next week I actually started getting us ready for playgroup and then said oh no actually we can't because of your behaviour. She was devastated, but I said she could try again next week, and we did and she has been an angel about it ever since. Good luck!

  3. #13
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    I have nothing. Apart from leaving which would be impossible if you are by yourself. But then I don't judge for very rare smacks either.

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  5. #14
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    I would tell them that we are going to leave if they can't follow the rules.

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    I'm with share a book. With my kids I'd say they had to sit with me til they could play nicely, or go home. In your situation where it's virtually impossible to do that I really don't know. I guess I'd smack them in the hand like you did? I dunno, I'm stumped!

  7. #16
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    OJandMe is offline I am the strength my children will have.
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    I have not read any other replies... but this is how I would deal with that situation.

    Firstly.... NO ONE has the right to speak to you like that. Nuff said.

    Okay... So he's being dangerous I would say to my boys (Who are also risk-takers, extreme extroverts who act before thinking, extremely persistent and resist stopping):
    "Stop! What you are doing is unsafe. I understand you like to be active, but you need to be safe. Let's work out a plan of how you can play safely." At that point, your child snarls at you... so I would say

    "(name) In our family we are polite to each other you MUST NOT snarl at me like that. You can say "Mum, I feel I am playing safely. Or you can say "Mum, I don't want to stop this game." But you WILL NOT snarl at me."

    Then I would repeat: "You can choose to play safely and politely, or you can choose to go home."

    Then your child will respond in either one of two way... they will say they want to play safely and politely.. to which you respond "That's a good choice, I will show you how to play safely and we can have a nice time."

    or they will continue to be rude to which you respond: "(Name) In our family we are polite to each other. The choice was to play safely and politely or to go home. You are choosing not to be polite, so we will go home."

    And then
    go
    home.

  8. #17
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    threechooks is offline If my spelling annoys you that's your problem.... I have better things to do than proofread !
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    If my 12 week old bub was in a pram. I would wheel her to the nearest staff member. Ask them to watch her for 2 minutes. I would grab the child and explain that that sort of behaviour means that we go straight home. Grab him and take him to the car, put his belt on him in and return inside to get my baby. i would not give warnings for that sort of behaviour, or negotiate. It would be straight home. Do not pass go.

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  10. #18
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    OJandMe is offline I am the strength my children will have.
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    I just read that it's not his usual behaviour....

    If that is so, could something trigger it? I know my aforementioned spirited risk-takers get monumentally rude and aggressive when they actually need some time out to recoup themselves.

    If he starts acting like that could you say something like : The way you are talking to me and acting is telling me that you need a break. Would you like to come and choose a drink/food/book? or direct him towards a quieter section of the play centre.

    I also know that for my boys when their intensity level rises I need to get them doing a repeated physical activity.. such as bouncing on the trampoline, swinging in the hammock or riding their scooter up and down the drive.....

    ETA: and I agree with threechooks about the pram and leaving.

  11. #19
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    I would probably be going home at that point. I have done that before, but they have to be pretty badly behaved for me to get to that point. Although I can carry both my kids still (the oldest is 6), which helps.

    Sounds difficult!

  12. #20
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    If u cant physically remove him, then i just wouldnt take him. And explain why when he asks to go.


 

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