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  1. #11
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    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
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    Also, we are in cool climate of Victoria to but find our compost are really quick. We have bays; hubby mulches everything that goes in so it is already smallish. WE don't put food scraps in them though - we have a worm farm for that and make 'tea' out of it for fertiliser.

    Also, we have ALOT of comfrey growing around the place. We put this in our compost and it makes a huge difference. We also use it to make a 'tea' as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NAT256 View Post
    Hi Lovemyfam. I do have a bit of compost going, just 2 bins of it at the moment in the backyard. We are about to create bigger ones on the farm and I must admit mine are always so slow! We live in a cooler climate so I don't know if this makes a difference. Do you have any tips for getting them going? Did you build bays for them?

    One thing we've done for fertiliser is make seaweed fertiliser. We are on the coast and we put seaweed in a plastic bin, add water and create a 'tea'. This, diluted, onto plants seems to be lovely for them and cheaper than the commercial version.

    We currently have sheep that we butcher ourselves sometimes but often send to the butcher as it's cheap and easy. We've thought about pigs but I must admit, I think I'd get a bit attached. We probably will some day but chooks, ducks etc will come first.
    we just had a huge pile in the yard and turned it a lot we were in a dry warm climate and then when we had one in Pennsylvania it was humid climate so not sure about cooler climates I can try to find some tips though

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    Hi kbf2plus2 and buttoneska. Great to have you along.
    Buttoneska - good to hear you're in the cooler climate too. We are at the bottom of SA so in a similar climate. Do you use a lot of manure in your compost? I wonder if this might help? I used a couple of bags of horse poo in it once and it got going really well. We have sheep....BUT our shearing shed isn't possible to get under to get the manure. I might have to get the rake out and follow them around instead

    The permaculture really interests me but I can't see myself going full-on with it, just taking the bits that fit with us. I have one great Bill Mollison book and it has certainly been the starting point for lots of our ideas.

    We have 80 acres and it's pretty much a blank canvas for us, so it's a big project. We run a couple of hundred sheep but apart from that it's starting from scratch. We have an old cottage built in 1854 that has been our focus to renovate but now that that is nearing completion we are looking to move out there and get started on everything else. There are sooooo many options for what to do that my head goes crazy with it. I think we just need to plod along and tackle one thing at a time. We are adding a food storage cellar, store room, preparation area etc as we renovate with a view to this self-sufficient idea so we're trying to get our head around the big picture. So many ideas!!

  4. #14
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    Buttoneska is offline Winner 2010- Most Community Minded Thread Award
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    yeh thats what we do - just use what we think will help - we don't realyl care whats its called, just as long as it works for us.

    WOW 80acres is alot - our 8acres gets overwhelming sometimes!

    From what we have read, for somethign that big the big focus would be on water (they say you should dedicate 15% of your land area to water catchment/recycling sytems), land erosion and vegetation. (so basically earthworks to start with).

    Depending on your long term goals, its probably good to have a skeleton plan of the main design. Get the topography sorted out and plan the overall design things that make sense with the land - your main zones, locations of dams, swales. and then planting out certain areas to create wind breaks, heat and cool traps etc. The later on you can add all the details. The trees will take 5yrs or so to grow so you can plod along after that doing the smaller things.

    And yeh we use horse poo and lots of it (we live near a stud so get it fro free)

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Buttoneska For This Useful Post:

    NAT256  (06-02-2012)

  6. #15
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    We live on less than 800m block with house and have 4 chooks.
    Also have various lil veg garden beds front, sides & back.
    Have wild tomatoes & potatoes growing in kids playground mulch!

    We live in Victoria and mid last year until now we have griwn and eaten: peas, snow peas, assorted lettuce, strawberries, oranges, passion fruit, apricots, pepino fruit (hopefully chilean guava soon!!), corn, garlic, spring onions, leeks, red onions, garlic chives, chives, parsley, cucumbers, zuchinni, cherry tomatoes, blk rusdian tomatoes (make best chutney/ have made iver 40 dolmio jars worth off one plant!!!), golden nugget pumpkin, eggplant, thyme & baby carrots.
    Had no luck with cauliflower or brocolli (caterpillar infestation twice regardless of where I planted them! Chooks loved it though)

    It is a bit trial & error depending on soil & where u live - I rarely water unless we have a week full on heat then I had seasol and give them a good drenching!!! Other than that I'm pretty neglectful if anything and am always amazed when things grow!!!

    There are a few pages I follow on FB and subscribed to a monthly email which tells you for each region monthly what to plant, prep & harvest.

    Will post back with names & links :-)

    Best thing for fussy lil eaters!! If my DDs pick it themselves good chance they'll eat it!!!!


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    Ooh, keen to see those links, Crissy! When our house is (finally) build, DP and I won't have a lot of backyard space, so I'm going to have to try and make do. I know I'll definitely be taking full advantage of a kitchen planter box for herbs, but apart from that I'll have to wait and see how much room we have.
    If I don't have enough room, I'll have to settle for a solitary tomato plant

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    www.gardenate.com for monthly email update for your area.

    FB page - Australian Organic Gardening


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    Quote Originally Posted by Berrie View Post
    Ooh, keen to see those links, Crissy! When our house is (finally) build, DP and I won't have a lot of backyard space, so I'm going to have to try and make do. I know I'll definitely be taking full advantage of a kitchen planter box for herbs, but apart from that I'll have to wait and see how much room we have.
    If I don't have enough room, I'll have to settle for a solitary tomato plant
    You will actually be amazed at how little room you need :-)
    Google small veg garden designs - loads of inspiring ideas


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    Wow CrissyG - that sounds brilliant. Well done! You must pack it all in and it sounds like you use all available space too. I love this idea. Will try to use usable plants where I can as we set up. Eg, passionfruit vine over the chook fence etc.

    Buttoneska - I'm envious of your horse poo! I need to source some manure in bulk somewhere. Although we are in a rural area, gathered manure is scarce. I'll have to find a feed lot or something.
    Fortunately we're not starting from scratch with our farm, it's fenced well into 6 paddocks and it's all on a hill so we've cleared a bore and now pump up to a tank and gravity feed water to the cottage. It has a 4 stand shearing shed and yards so we'll only need to a add a small cattle yard to run a few steers for some $ and meat too. We have a natural water course that runs along the bottom of our hill which fills in winter and the soil stays beautifully damp year round. A friend suggested we fence a little area from the sheep and throw pumpkin/watermelon etc down there as they won't need watering with the wet feet they'll have. Anyone know if this would work?

    The farm part is easy enough for us, but it's the house/home garden stuff that I'm starting to plan and get my head around. So another question...

    We are planning to build a chook yard and shed some time soon. We want chooks (probably a dozen or so) and a few ducks (for snails!). I'm not sure whether to put these near our house yard or up on the hill near the shearing shed (about 200m away). I'd like them near the house for ease but know they attract mice and snakes which would be better away from the house. Is it right that ducks can wander the garden and won't eat vegies? Do they just eat bugs/snails? So many questions....

  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrissyG View Post
    www.gardenate.com for monthly email update for your area.

    FB page - Australian Organic Gardening


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    Great website CrissyG! Thanks!


 

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