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    Default Dreaming of a (semi) self-sufficient lifestyle?

    Hi all, I've just found this section of the forum and am wondering if there are others out there who would like to share ideas about growing veg, saving power, chooks, permaculture etc etc that all lead to a semi-self-sufficient lifestyle? Or at least save money!

    I'm new to the idea and so far have only grown vegies etc but we are about to move out of town to our little farm block and are looking at getting advice and trying some new ideas. Now I have to say....I'm no committed greenie! In fact I'm pretty hopeless at even understanding how anything grows or what time of year to plant etc. But I'm willing to learn and have been working hard to try things out. So if anyone else knows anything or would like to toss around some ideas, let me know.

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    Would love to learn about this too if anyone has hints

    Sent from my GT-I9000 using BubHub

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    This has been a dream of mine for ages. We're on a decent block now and have vege beds and a dozen fruit trees, a worm farm, and I would love to get chooks, but are holding off for now due to start up costs.

    I'd love to be semi self sufficient. I've even just planted sugar cane for an experiment.

    I'm still just learning myself though. My biggest obstacle is pest control. I hate chemicals, but we lost all our strawberries to caterpillars and most of our mulberries to birds. Peas, beans, corn and pumpkin worked well, but every lettuce or salad green I've planted has been inedibly bitter despite loads of water. So still lots of learning to do for me.

    I've found Daley's online is a great place for buying food plants, including many hard to find ones, and for info. The other thing I've found good is growing from seed whenever possible. So much cheaper and most vegies are fast growers. Fruit trees are best bought as grafted trees though as it seems a lot do not grow true from seed and can take years to fruit.

    I could rabbit on for ages about this topic. I love gardening.

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    Izy. Let's see how we go here. I see you're in Brisbane. I'm in S.A. but I figure a lot of basics are the same, just different times of the year.

    Do you have a backyard garden? That's all I have so far and have spent a couple of years experimenting with four garden beds of vegies and a herb bed. Trying to be organic as much as possible and try out some simple home-remedies to problems Eg: my major snail problem! We live in the country so access to good produce is limited and expensive, being a great motivator to grow our own.

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    Miss Muppet. Fantastic to have you along too! Your block sounds great and you sound very similar to me, just giving things a go to see how it works out.
    We put an orchard out on the farm about 3 years ago but it has been a bit neglected with us living in town so we are currently trying to spruce it up.
    I think we'll have to invest in lots of bird netting. We have two fig trees on the farm that must be over 100 years old and they produce HEAPS of fruit but the birds get most of it before we do! I'm keeping a close eye on them this year to catch the fruit at exactly the right time and then try some fig drying (not that I know how yet....)

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    I did this for some time when I lived in Nevada, we grew our veggies and raised our own chickens for eggs and meat, we raised goats and pigs for meat. We butchered our own chickens and a friend did the goats and pigs. I am not sure we saved money but we ate healthier between the feed, worming, and grain to make sure our animals we ate were healthy and fat we prob spent more money but the meat was much better. Butchering is not for the faint at heart and some people end up with pets because they cant do it, I will admit while I had no trouble killing the chickens the pigs and goats are tough because they are so cute. If you need any tips feel free to ask, we also went a period where we didnt use electricity except to wash clothes, we used oil lamps for light and when it was dark we went to sleep

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    Quote Originally Posted by NAT256 View Post
    Izy. Let's see how we go here. I see you're in Brisbane. I'm in S.A. but I figure a lot of basics are the same, just different times of the year.

    Do you have a backyard garden? That's all I have so far and have spent a couple of years experimenting with four garden beds of vegies and a herb bed. Trying to be organic as much as possible and try out some simple home-remedies to problems Eg: my major snail problem! We live in the country so access to good produce is limited and expensive, being a great motivator to grow our own.
    Do you have a compost pile going? they are great for gardens

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    Hi Lovemyfam. I do have a bit of compost going, just 2 bins of it at the moment in the backyard. We are about to create bigger ones on the farm and I must admit mine are always so slow! We live in a cooler climate so I don't know if this makes a difference. Do you have any tips for getting them going? Did you build bays for them?

    One thing we've done for fertiliser is make seaweed fertiliser. We are on the coast and we put seaweed in a plastic bin, add water and create a 'tea'. This, diluted, onto plants seems to be lovely for them and cheaper than the commercial version.

    We currently have sheep that we butcher ourselves sometimes but often send to the butcher as it's cheap and easy. We've thought about pigs but I must admit, I think I'd get a bit attached. We probably will some day but chooks, ducks etc will come first.

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    Hey there, there are a couple of other spots on the forum that have some threads about this sort of thing (sorry I don't know where exactly maybe in this section, but I thought theter was a 'green section' kinda thing)

    Anyway, we moved from the city 4yrs ago with the of being more self sufficient.

    We have 8acres that we are slowly, slowly getting our head around.

    We have vegie garden, worm farm, compost bays, dams etc etc. No chickens yet - we need to prepare a big area for them to run around in.

    We just started reading books for information and inspiration. We did a permaculture design course online and also have bill mollison books. It has all been really helpful, but we kinda just take the bits we use and leave the bits we dont' think apply. There are alot of rule in permaculture, but we take it a philosophy that can be applied in many many ways to achieve the same goals.

    For our veggie gardens - we use no dig which was invented by Esther Dean (she has some good books/internet info).

    Bascially, in order to cmpelte the perm design course you needed to come up with a plan for a property so we used our property as our assignment. Using the principles we designed where we needed to build things in order to get teh best results. Ie, where to put dams, trees, greenhouses etc etc. The main thing has been planting trees and that has been our focus for the last 12mths or so.

    Now that is done, we are focusing on the food forest which has self sustaining system that requires no human interaction to flourish.

    We get all our seeds from eden seeds and are just learning how to seed save.

    umm in not really sure what other info would be helpful, but if you have anythign specific please ask.

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    Subscribing.

    I too dream of becoming self-sufficient (or part thereof). We are on a farm so have meat, eggs and milk covered but I need to get a vege garden going. We planted a heap of fruit trees last year (mainly citrus at this stage) and I'm looking forward to them bearing fruit 'cause our girls are a pair of fruit bats!!

    My biggest problems are that I have a BROWN thumb (very good at killing any thing and every thing that is plant-like!!) and I am time poor.

    I'm open to any advice that anyone has to help me become a better gardener.


 

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