View Poll Results: Would you let your child model?

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  • No way

    17 51.52%
  • Maybe, if they wanted to

    11 33.33%
  • Yes for sure

    4 12.12%
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  1. #21
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    No because I don't think it's appropriate but I also don't judge those that do
    It's up to each family

  2. #22
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    wow lots of great responses, sounds like everyone had their children's best interests at heart as i said earlier its not something i could do, but i do like looking at kids catalogues so i guess i cant criticize! (oh that sounds a bit weird, don't mean it in a sinister way lol).

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  4. #23
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    I don't think many people are aware of the really really strict rules and laws for a child to do media and modelling. There are so many hoops to jump through, and even the child's school gets a say in whether or not a child is allowed to work. I also don't think many people are aware of the amount of work on behalf of the child and parent. No one could force a child to work, they would get work of their heart wasn't in it. I also think, for as much as there is a lot of emphasis on looks, there has to be a huge amount of natural talent - a child who doesn't work to the camera for example just won't get work. It NOT just looks, it's something a not more than thatFor example, any child can be taught to play football/soccer/tennis, but unless there is a natural talent, drive and hunger they will never make the professional circuit, and the same is in the media.To make it in any field, media, sport or CEO of a business there needs to be a particular *something* (apart from just looks) that a persons needs to have, as well as a strong work ethic and a thick skin.
    Last edited by WorkingClassMum; 01-02-2012 at 10:56.

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrunks View Post
    This is a semi spin off I guess, from lots of threads that mention child modelling...
    would youletyour child become a model? Or do modelling? I am talking mainly under 12s I guess, but even up to teens, while you still have some control over it. I just don't really get why anyone would do this. To me it sets themselves up to value their self-worth on their appearance, which seems ludicrous. I mean my kids are amazing looking, don't get me wrong but it just seems like such a cruel thing to do.
    So without starting a huge fight, or offending anyone, I would genuinely like to Know why people would do it?
    cheers.
    Ps. Ironically as I posted an ad appeared at the side for a child cuteness contest.

    If my child was old enough to tell me that's what he wanted to do then that's fine.

    But when it comes to mothers living their dream through their children such as what you see on "toddlers and tiara's" this doesn't sit well with myself and dh at all. It's a form of abuse forcing your child to dress, act, a face full of makeup, hair extensions, spray tans, plucked eye brows, false eye lashs, false nails, plates on their teeth and parade around like they do. It makes me feel physically ill. And those parents are in denial when they say "she enjoys it" when you can see very obviously that most don't, they feel they have to do it because they aren't given a choice. I watched an episode once when a 2yr old was battling to stay awake during a competition as it was her sleep time, she was given lollies to keep her awake. And the pressure to succeed and the disapointment on the parents faces when they don't win is terrible!

  7. #25
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    I guess it would depend on the kind of pictures being taken. If it was for my daughter and she was made up like the 13-14 year old girls that pop up in vogue magazine looking like they are 20- then HELL NO

    But if it was something fairly harmless and natural looking then maybe.. But i don't know either i think the industry is shady at the best of times.

    I was a prmotional model and we had 'castings' for car shows and events that could often times be brutal (but i have no idea if it's the same for childrens castings). The people looking you over don't hold back when they tell you what needs changing or what they don't like, or do like. I would hate for my child to base their worth on their looks. Kids have enough of that in school and via the media as it is.
    Last edited by laurea; 01-02-2012 at 11:19.

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    no, i wouldn't want/let my kids do modelling.

  10. #27
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    Hard to say really.

    DD did some baby modeling when she was 7 months old and once that contract was up I swore never again.

    They were too rough with her (IMO) spent hours trying to get her to make different faces and hold different poses. It was noisy & hectic and DD looked confused at the end of each session. Plus they weren't supportive of her sleep needs.

    Now she's 20 mnths (and would probably yell and struggle if THEY didn't do what SHE wanted) I might let her do it.

    Once she old enough to express her wants and needs and if I thought she was mentally mature enough to not be consumed by the industry I would consider it.

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    My daughter has done modeling since birth for WAHP businesses.

    I like the free stuff we get as payment, but won't pursue getting her representation unless she asked (she's 9 months old).

    For now it's pretty clothes and pretty pictures.
    This

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by laurea View Post
    I guess it would depend on the kind of pictures being taken. If it was for my daughter and she was made up like the 13-14 year old girls that pop up in vogue magazine looking like they are 20- then HELL NO But if it was something fairly harmless and natural looking then maybe.. But i don't know either i think the industry is shady at the best of times. I was a prmotional model and we had 'castings' for car shows and events that could often times be brutal (but i have no idea if it's the same for childrens castings). The people looking you over don't hold back when they tell you what needs changing or what they don't like, or do like. I would hate for my child to base their worth on their looks. Kids have enough of that in school and via the media as it is.
    I have never let my DD to be made up to look like anything except what she is Ive never heard a harsh word mentioned to a child at a casting, wardrobe fitting or during filming - children all get told they did well during a casting audition, they all get thanked and they get treated very very well on set. I've only ever seen one child refuse to be filmed at a filming and they were allowed to leave and they were still thanked for turning up I have once seen a child refuse to do a task (throw up) - and then my DS was asked and he happily 'threw up' a mouth full of yoghurt and pineapple. When the production crew were asked what would they do if both kids refused they said they'd quickly rewrite that small scene or work with what they had
    ...


    I think there is a huge misconception about what actually takes place when children work in the media these days
    Last edited by WorkingClassMum; 01-02-2012 at 13:06.

  13. #30
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    no. My kids will only be doing a very very limited number of extra curricular activities and I would want them to do something that develops more skills than modelling would. Playing team sports, or an instrument, or performing arts etc.


 

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