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  1. #1
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    Default Question abou milk supply...

    How long does it take normally for a womans milk to come in?

    Hope this isnt a silly question.

    With ds1 i tried to breastfeed but had alot of problems...he wasnt latching properly and it was very painfull...i had scabby bleeding nipples so in the end i would be crying out when i tried to feed.

    Also my boobs didnt really change at all...no heaviness or milk squirting out or change in shape nd size as so many other women talk about. When i decided enough was enough [in the end ds1 would not even try to latch just wanted nothing to do with my boobs] so i stopped again there was no issue...no leaky boobs...no heaviness, hardness or pain...next day my were just back to normal...i dont think my milk even ever came in.

    I want to try nd breastfeed next bub but feel really put off by my
    1st expereince...i found the midwives no help at all being constantly told to just persevere with no actual practical/helpful advice just really ****ed me off in the end just told them to leave me alone and put ds1 on formula.

    Sorry for the ramble but yeah my actual question is how long does it take for your milk supply to come in?
    TIA

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    On average it should be in by 3 days after the birth, but of course that can vary slightly. Until then you will produce colostrum. Definitely consider talking to a lactation consultant, they are invaluable when it comes to learning to breastfeed successfully

    And your question wasn't silly at all! I remember wondering the same thing when I was pregnant with DD and she is now still happily breastfed at 22 months.

  3. #3
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    Mine took almost five days, but apparently that can happen after a c-section.
    A doula friend of mine said that if you stimulate your breasts for a week or so before your due date it can help to encourage the milk to come in quicker.
    Using a breast pump here and there might also help with tender nipples.

  4. #4
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    Mine took 3 days. I agree with PP, a lactation consultant would be great. Also talking to the Australian Breastfeeding Association would also be a good step.

    I found some of the middies at my hospital to be contradictory so I think having a LC and being armed with additional bf advice would be great.

  5. #5
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    I was a lot like you. It took nearly a week for my milk to come in! It was so frustrating as the midwives kept saying "you're doing fine" but I had to use a nipple shield and I don't think my nipples ever got the stimulation to know to make milk! In the end I was set up with an awesome Lactation Consultant....in order to get my milk in I had to express A LOT. After every single feed for 20min. I would then top bubs up with anything I expressed and then formula. I hired a Medela pump to express and that really helped. I kept hearing about people leaking, and breasts feeling hot and heavy, but really that didn't start happening to me until about 3 weeks after I got home from the hospital.

    I also took Motilium which helps with milk supply. You can get it prescribed by your OB. Hope that helps!

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    It should take 3-4 days but this can vary depending on the type of birth you have and any post birth complications. Also your supply is very fragile to begin with. Most normal healthy babies need to feed at least 8-12 times in a 24 hr period (more likely 12 times or more). Lots of mums who have cracked or sore nipples, understandably don't want to feed that much cause it HURTS so they aren't stimulating their breasts enough (therefore low supply develops). The baby needs to take the nipple to the back of the mouth and most or your areola needs to be in the mouth. That should avoid nipple damage so you can feed more frequently. Also it is suggested that you avoid dummies and bottles for the first 6-8 weeks until your milk supply is well established.
    I would consult a LC or the ABA prior to birth to get some help. You can call the ABA hotline 24/7 and it is free advice. Also they do excellent classes such as Breastfeeding Education Class and Breastfeeding with Confidence.

  7. #7
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    I understand it can take from 2 days to over a week and can depend on drugs used at birth. With DS it took 6 days (I had an induction and epi) and with DD I could express a teeny bit of colostrum immediately and it just gradually changed to milk (there was no obvious end of colostrum and change to milk) - apart from gas at transition she was an intervention and drug free birth.

    My advice would be to join the ABA and start reading on how to bf now and get yourself an LC. Midwives and doctors can be notorious at providing poor, unhelpful and contradictory advice. Maybe even start reading through the bf section of posts in there to get an idea of the issues women have faced and some ideas for resolution as well.

    Best of luck.

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    Thanks for your replies ladies so much more helpful than anything a middie told me!
    I have contacted the aba and will be doing a breastfeeding education class so it will not be as stressful this time. I do realise after what i went through the time to get advice and help is before you actually start lol...

    I really would like to be successful this time

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    Bubbles10  (26-01-2012),smallpotatoes  (27-01-2012)

  11. #9
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    Just thought I would also say that my hospital provided a LC if you wanted to talk with one after the birth in those first few hours/days. Maybe check out if yours does too.
    Good luck!


 

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