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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by AM View Post
    This logic escapes me. It's kind of like saying "Lets not overstate the benefits of walking on two legs" Um, it's what humans do, and what we are specifically built to do!

    As though we would somehow upset people who have to use wheelchairs or something....
    Ok I have said numerous times that I agree there are benefits to BF for as long as possible. I also said it's natural and normal and should be encouraged and supported.

    Eating food is also what humans do. This thread was about long term BF as opposed to gaining nutrition exclusively from food.

    I don't actually have a strong opinion either way, I was just trying to say that research should be considered critically. But you can't have a differing opinion on BF around here without getting slammed, even when you're essentially agreeing!

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    Cue, I am sorry to hear breastfeeding did not work out for you, and that you needed to wean at 12 weeks. Most mothers find the decision difficult and emotional, so I hope you had the support you needed at the time.

    It must have been hard to read information like this at the time, and maybe still now.

    Sometimes breastfeeding does not work out for all sorts of different reasons, despite best intentions. I guess it is good to remember that breastfeeding is just one part of being a loving mother, and while it is important, it is not everything.

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  4. #43
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    Thanks Purplecat - it was very hard at the time but with plenty of counseling I have been able to see the bigger picture.

    I really hope to BF longer next time but if the next one has the same health problems then I won't hesitate to stop.

    Sorry everyone for getting upset.

  5. #44
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    In response to the OP, I guess the WHO offers a blanket recommendation because it eliminates confusion about just who is first world and who is third world etc. Borders are a fairly arbitrary demarcation when we are looking at quality of nutrition, access to good health and medical services etc. Consider the difference between the standard of living of myself in a near-inner city suburb of a capital city and that of say an Aboriginal woman in a remote indigenous community in norther WA for example, or in South Africa between someone in a shanty town to someone in a middle class suburb. Even in the US, many of the Native American reserves are considered to have a standard of living equal to that of a *third world* (hate that term) country, a similar problem to the one that we have in this country.

    It is also possible that, despite our access to fantastic fresh produce in most parts of this country, people can become malnourished through the poor food choices that they make for themselves and their children. Hence the benefit of a blanket ruling. Unfortunately, not all children will receive adequate nutrition through breastmilk or formula, and a healthy varied diet, but having the recommendation in place helps to set a standard or something to aim for.

    On the issue of vit D, I think that so many of us have become so terrified of exposing our children to the midday sun, or any sun at all for that matter, that children could very easily be missing out on Vit D from the sun, which I believe to be considered the best source. I remember reading about a new child care centre that opened in Brisbane which was in a building in the inner city that had no outdoor spaces. It is entirely possible that some of the children at that centre could be dropped off before 8 (for example) and not get home until 6, leaving only weekends to get a good dose of sun. If those kids are not getting a good and varied diet they could certainly become Vit D deficient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialPatrolGroup View Post
    In response to the OP, I guess the WHO offers a blanket recommendation because it eliminates confusion about just who is first world and who is third world etc. Borders are a fairly arbitrary demarcation when we are looking at quality of nutrition, access to good health and medical services etc. Consider the difference between the standard of living of myself in a near-inner city suburb of a capital city and that of say an Aboriginal woman in a remote indigenous community in norther WA for example, or in South Africa between someone in a shanty town to someone in a middle class suburb. Even in the US, many of the Native American reserves are considered to have a standard of living equal to that of a *third world* (hate that term) country, a similar problem to the one that we have in this country.

    It is also possible that, despite our access to fantastic fresh produce in most parts of this country, people can become malnourished through the poor food choices that they make for themselves and their children. Hence the benefit of a blanket ruling. Unfortunately, not all children will receive adequate nutrition through breastmilk or formula, and a healthy varied diet, but having the recommendation in place helps to set a standard or something to aim for.

    On the issue of vit D, I think that so many of us have become so terrified of exposing our children to the midday sun, or any sun at all for that matter, that children could very easily be missing out on Vit D from the sun, which I believe to be considered the best source. I remember reading about a new child care centre that opened in Brisbane which was in a building in the inner city that had no outdoor spaces. It is entirely possible that some of the children at that centre could be dropped off before 8 (for example) and not get home until 6, leaving only weekends to get a good dose of sun. If those kids are not getting a good and varied diet they could certainly become Vit D deficient.
    We have one like that here, they have an indoor play area with swings, climbing frame, sandpit, bikes and bike track, basketball hoops and balls, everything you would find outside normally. There were kids there by 7am who were then picked up after 6pm. They came in still in there pyjamas, not yet fed and barely awake and went home ready for bed.

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    Cue, I totally get what you were (are) trying to say. I too had to deal with having to stop BFing before I wanted to and a year later I still get angry when I think that there are new mums out there going through such a confusing, frustrating time whilst having to hear that their newborn might be less intelligent if they stop breastfeeding.

    I learned not to pay attention to articles written by people (so often men!) like Dr Jack Newman

    An article I love reading often is similar to the one you posted concerning the overstated pros and cons of BF/FF in the popular media.

    It also discusses an issue seldom brought up - that is the mental health and happiness of the mother. As a feminist I resent being told what I must do with my body.

    Anyway check out the article -

    http://m.theatlantic.com/magazine/ar...-feeding/7311/

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    Discussing research-based evidence of the protective effects of breastfeeding is far from telling someone what to do wtih their body.

    As a very important issue for women (and infant) health though, I'm sure as a feminist you can see how critical it is for adequate funding to be given to resources and education, for protective legislation to be in place to ensure a woman is able to exercise this part of her biology, and for breastfeeding to become normalised.

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    My reading of the research has lead me to conclude that the risks of artificial feeding are more alarming for mothers than babies. Not breastfeeding increases the risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancers, diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and strokes. Personally, as an older mother I want to stay as healthy as possible for as long as possible and breastfeeding is a healthy thing to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SPC View Post
    My reading of the research has lead me to conclude that the risks of artificial feeding are more alarming for mothers than babies. Not breastfeeding increases the risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancers, diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and strokes. Personally, as an older mother I want to stay as healthy as possible for as long as possible and breastfeeding is a healthy thing to do.
    How much does the risk increase by?

    I think sleep deprivation can also put you at risk of those things. I don't think waking every few hours for years is healthy so luckily with bottle feeding DH can share the night feeds.

    Bit off topic there but just something I'm always conscious of!

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    Quote Originally Posted by lemonpancakes View Post
    Cue, I totally get what you were (are) trying to say. I too had to deal with having to stop BFing before I wanted to and a year later I still get angry when I think that there are new mums out there going through such a confusing, frustrating time whilst having to hear that their newborn might be less intelligent if they stop breastfeeding.

    I learned not to pay attention to articles written by people (so often men!) like Dr Jack Newman

    An article I love reading often is similar to the one you posted concerning the overstated pros and cons of BF/FF in the popular media.

    It also discusses an issue seldom brought up - that is the mental health and happiness of the mother. As a feminist I resent being told what I must do with my body.

    Anyway check out the article -

    http://m.theatlantic.com/magazine/ar...-feeding/7311/
    That was a really interesting read, thanks for that.


 
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