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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey face View Post
    Maria02, I think there are a few more things you could have used re: grad nurses first starting out in nursing.

    1/ Many new nurse grads have already been working for years in hospitals, doing the same thing, as EN's.
    2/ Starting from day of enrolment, students are working in hospitals as AIN's, so they get to know the hospital system, are able to do the more simpler tasks required of nurses etc
    3/ In their 2nd year summer break, students can take a 6 week course which will qualify them to work their 3rd year as an EN, so by graduation they already have a years experience.
    4/ Grad programs- nurses get 'eased' into work, by starting off with reduced workloads, a mentor, regular classes and essay/assignments which are more indepth and in line with the area they are doing the grad program in. One of my friends got 6 months oncology which she learnt so much more about IV's and pharmacology than she would have just being thrown in without a grad program. She is now starting her second 6 months in urology.

    Midwifery, whether DEM, dual or postgrad, would be great if they had something like a grad program or a short course in their 2nd year that allows them some sort of qualification to work as an assisting midwife during their final year, so that when they graduate, they are ready to hit the floor running and feel even more confidence in themselves. That would be awesome!

    I personally am not looking forward to my first clinical placement. I have heard that most students get placed in aged care. This is another area I am not interested in. I am a personal support worker of a very young man in a coma, and I love that, but I also know that aged care is not my thing. I can't wait for a placement where I can get into the ED or OR. Those are the areas for me- fast paced, react fast and brain constantly being challenged.
    FWIW - At our university the DEmidwifery students do 1200 hours of clinical placement, PLUS their follow through journeys on top of that (min 10hours per woman for 8 women) Most of us do MUCH more than that as a birth can be many more hours. We are often also given the opportunity (hospital willing) to do extra shifts over our university break.

    The nursing students do 800 hours of placement.



    There ARE graduate midwifery positions just like there are Nursing ones!

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  3. #82
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    I would like to point out that I fully applaud the level of qualifications that DEM's obtain during their degree.

    My opinion is mainly based as a mother and a woman who is currently pregnant. My preference is to have an RNM who has had several years of experience in both nursing and catching babies. I would feel safer having my baby born under the supervision of an extremely experienced RNM rather than a DEM who, while has amazing qualifications, wouldn't have the level of experience that I would feel comfortable with in my vulnerable state.

    This is JMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OneNowOneLater View Post
    I would like to point out that I fully applaud the level of qualifications that DEM's obtain during their degree.

    My opinion is mainly based as a mother and a woman who is currently pregnant. My preference is to have an RNM who has had several years of experience in both nursing and catching babies. I would feel safer having my baby born under the supervision of an extremely experienced RNM rather than a DEM who, while has amazing qualifications, wouldn't have the level of experience that I would feel comfortable with in my vulnerable state.

    This is JMHO.
    Seriously, after working for 10-20 years do really think there's any difference in the expertise of a N/M and a DEM? I'd take midwifery EXPERIENCE over an education certificate anyday. And to me, having a midwife who had previously worked in oncology or palliative care or something wouldn't be of any benefit at all.

    I personally prefer a midwife with lots of experience, I completely trust a less experienced midwife with my care, but just think those with experience probably do the support part better.

    But the only way to get experience is to actually go out there and get it.

    And yes, as cupcake and RHJ said, DEM do hours of placement, some unis the students work 2 days a week for most of the degree, and as far as I know I alot of midwives do graduate programs where they are rotated between different parts of the hospital- birthing suite, day clinic, post natal ward etc to gain more experience.

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  6. #84
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    After 10-20 years of experience - there would be little difference. But the DEM degrees are still relatively new - so subsequently I would personally trust my child birthing experience, AT THIS POINT IN TIME, to an experienced RNM.

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    It is amazing how high emotions run when people are passionate about something.

    I am starting the double degree this year. For my future, which I hope will be in neonatal care. This is perhaps the very best option. It was a hard decision to make as I would have preferred the DEM. Which would still have allowed me to work in scbu. The only other thing I would consider doing as a career (at this point) is Midwifery.

    I am really not looking forward to aged care. Or pallative or anything similar. However I know the double is the best option for myself personally.

    I actually would have been more than happy to have a DEM assist at my deliveries. I have had 4 children. One born in OZ and 3 in UK. In the UK, DEM is the norm. So it is likely that my Mids were DEM's. My only feelings were on age, sex and experience.

    I felt at the birth I wanted only females around. Did not happen though. Age was irrelevant as I was 18 and 20. Therefore younger than any one qualified. By the time I had my 3rd then 4th I did want someone older. Purely because I felt slightly uncomfortable with very young girls. However I got over it.
    I never had a male midwife but I disliked all the Male obstetricians, which totally put me off Males and them being near for Birthing for all 4 children. I hope to get over myself in this area. As I am sure they do have a place.

    Experience was essential for all births. Though I did not ask to see their credentials. I think that women feel confident when their Midwife is confident and that if you feel they are experienced and confident then that is the most important thing to a labouring woman.

    This is my opinion and slightly off the topic in some regards.

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  9. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by kewok View Post
    Experience was essential for all births. Though I did not ask to see their credentials. I think that women feel confident when their Midwife is confident and that if you feel they are experienced and confident then that is the most important thing to a labouring woman.
    Trying to word it appropriately, but I believe that all midwives should appear confident regardless of their levels of experience. A calm midwife, makes a calm woman. There is nothing worse than a midwife (and I have see many of them with 10+ years experience as an RNM) flapping about like a headless chook because the lady's surprised her and started pushing etc.

  10. #87
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    Has anyone done their mental health placement?

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    Quote Originally Posted by babylover111 View Post
    Has anyone done their mental health placement?
    Yes! Ick. Men. Lol. No it wasn't that bad, we had a lady in with PND so that was useful. The other thing I learnt from that will help greatly is how to do a proper mental health referral so you can get help in the quickest possible time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    Yes! Ick. Men. Lol. No it wasn't that bad, we had a lady in with PND so that was useful. The other thing I learnt from that will help greatly is how to do a proper mental health referral so you can get help in the quickest possible time.
    Oh absolutely and how important early intervention is in mental health! I'm on it at the moment and I had my first week at an acute mental health ward and didn't enjoy it at all. It was high security with swipe cards from room to room and we had to have an alarm on us at all times. On a positive note it has made me so much more motivated to get into midwifery.

  13. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    Trying to word it appropriately, but I believe that all midwives should appear confident regardless of their levels of experience. A calm midwife, makes a calm woman. There is nothing worse than a midwife (and I have see many of them with 10+ years experience as an RNM) flapping about like a headless chook because the lady's surprised her and started pushing etc.
    I agree Cupcake. Having laboured 4 times. With different midwifes each time. I can honestly say that I think this is extremely important and can make a vast difference to a birthing women. I had two experiences where there was a slight concern for myself and my baby during labour. The first one, (first baby) increased my panic because I felt the room charge up with tension. I was scared and my experience is looked back on negatively in the way I was dealt with. My second was so different. (4th baby) I never even knew until afterwards that they were worried. Looking back I did sense when the atmosphere changed but it was more controlled.

    The very first moment I decided I wanted to be a midwife, was during my second labour. It was so different to my first and a lot of that, was the attitude of my midwives.
    This proved true when I had my third at the same hospital. My third labour I had a midwife from my first labour and another one who made me feel I was annoying her. This made my third birth quite miserable. I am quite sensitive to people around me unfortunately. My fourth was amazing because the Midwife was delighted I was delivering before she went off shift and made me feel important to her.

    Totally off topic now. Apologies.

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