+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 11 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 109
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,909
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked
    381
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    I take offence to that as I will be a 20 year old graduate, and I feel quite confident/competent. I fail to see how being a 20 year old graduate is any different to being a 30 year old graduate as we have both completed the same degree and have both been deemed competent to practice by our university and by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia. It's about the person not their age, and I can tell you I care a hell of a lot of more about the woman I care for then a lot of the older students in my class and the older midwives at the hospital. A lot more.

    You say you're in your first year? Take a look around at how many people are at your nursing orientation. Remember that number in 3 years time at your Graduation. On our first day of third year there was 55% of the original starting cohort left. That says to me that over the two years those who do not care, those who are not smart enough and those who can not cope have been weeded out. It is a tough program, and you have to want it to complete it. Its insulting for you to say that people are just doing it for a job. You seem to underestimate exactly how hard it is to complete a 3 year degree. Also the UK degree is a 4 year program with honours.

    As I mentioned above in the previous posts, I have been at 30+ births so far (20 of those my own deliveries), and will most likely have another 15-20 by the time I graduate. Post graduate midwives in their one year program often only have to do 10 births, and I have been kicked out of a labour in late October so a Postgrad could get her catches because she was running out of time. How does that make them a safer midwife than myself?

    The dual degree students only have half the clinical time in maternity. If they go onto work as a midwife, then they only have half the clinical experience that BMid students have. The comments from midwives at my current placement have reflected the fact that they don't think dual degree students or the current postgrad students are as clinically prepared as the b mid students.

    How is doing nursing first going to make you a better midwife for mothers and babies. If you cared that much you would go straight to the BMid. The best midwives I know (of those that we're non nurse midwives from the UK/NZ) have said if the B.Mid was around in their time there was no way in hell they would have done the nursing.
    As an expectant first time mum-

    I'm going through MGP. I'm glad my midwife has been working in the field for donkey's years and has 3 kids of her own.

    Speaking as an expectant mum now and not a RN, these are my reasons:

    1. She's been working in the field for a while and has a lot of experience seeing different presentations etc. I'm more confident that if anything happens to me, she'll have seen a case like me before and know what to do.

    2. Having kids of her own sort of makes me trust her a bit more. Funny -but I sort of feel like she knows what I'm going through more than a midwife without kids does.

    3. I also do like the fact that she's about 40. I'd probably feel a bit weird being looked after by a midwife who was 20 when I'm almost 30. Sorry, can't give you any reason for that, apart from that I'd feel a bit weird.

    I wouldn't mind a new grad looking after me on the ward for a shift, but I'd be keeping a close eye on what was happening and if I thought anything might be slightly abnormal I'd be asking them to report it to their shift coordinator. And certainly not a young midwife or new graduate in MGP- I would ask to have someone else looking after me.

    Just my thoughts as an expectant, nervous first time mum. Mean absolutely no offence to anyone but I want someone who's experienced looking after me and my baby (and not 'I saw lots of stuff while I was at uni' experienced).

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to TheMadHatter For This Useful Post:

    OneNowOneLater  (22-01-2012)

  3. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,909
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked
    381
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post

    How is doing nursing first going to make you a better midwife for mothers and babies. If you cared that much you would go straight to the BMid. The best midwives I know (of those that we're non nurse midwives from the UK/NZ) have said if the B.Mid was around in their time there was no way in hell they would have done the nursing.
    Not the case.
    Don't forget the BMid is a very recent degree- as I mentioned earlier, it wasn't even around when I started studying.

    How is doing it postgrad going to make you better?

    -You already know the basic nursing stuff. First year out after doing your postgrad you're not going to waste half an hour doing stuff like figuring out meds- trust me you'd be surprised first year out just how much time you can waste doing things that really shouldn't take much time. Meds, IV's, catheters, etc- easy.
    -Already have well established time managment skills.
    -Already know the way hospitals work, tricks to be used when chasing up/ organising people etc. I couldn't believe how much time nurses spent in organising who needs to be where when, making sure patients were at appointments at correct times etc.
    -Already used to shift work. I looked like a zombie by the end of my first month.
    -More in depth knowledge of other areas of nursing. I don't believe my knowledge of paediatrics and newborn nursing will be useless after becoming a midwife! I'll be glad for my experience in being able to say 'this baby is not quite right, there's something going on here....' And I don't think my ICU nursing experience will be useless either- I can react fast in emergency situations and jump on what needs to be done! Regardless of the area worked in beforehand, I don't see why it wouldn't be beneficial in some way.


    Just off the top of my head....
    Last edited by TheMadHatter; 22-01-2012 at 12:53. Reason: half written sentence

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    As an expectant first time mum-
    I wouldn't mind a new grad looking after me on the ward for a shift, but I'd be keeping a close eye on what was happening and if I thought anything might be slightly abnormal I'd be asking them to report it to their shift coordinator. And certainly not a young midwife or new graduate in MGP- I would ask to have someone else looking after me.
    To work in MGP you have to have experience. There's no question about that.

    But...are you going to be able to tell the difference between a 20 year old new grad and a 45 year old new grad? And are you going to treat them differently because of their age? Most likely yes.

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,072
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked
    269
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Sorry but what's an MGP? Lol sorry we don't have those in nz so have no idea

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    Not the case.
    -You already know the basic nursing stuff. First year out after doing your postgrad you're not going to waste half an hour doing stuff like figuring out meds- trust me you'd be surprised first year out just how much time you can waste doing things that really shouldn't take much time. Meds, IV's, catheters, etc- easy.
    -Already have well established time managment skills.
    -Already know the way hospitals work, tricks to be used when chasing up/ organising people etc. I couldn't believe how much time nurses spent in organising who needs to be where when, making sure patients were at appointments at correct times etc.
    -Already used to shift work. I looked like a zombie by the end of my first month.

    Just off the top of my head....
    Just out of interest, why is this an issue for new graduate midwives but not an issue for new graduate nurses??? Double standards.....

    Graduate nurses are going to have the exact same 'problems' that you've stated, and graduate dual degree nurses/midwives are also going to have the same 'problems'.

  7. #66
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,909
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked
    381
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    We learn about the pathophysiology of most conditions (diabetes, cardio, respiratory, endocrine, mental illness etc) and how it affects pregnancy and how pregnancy affects the disease and the medications involved in our BMid degree. We don't spend half the degree learning about high risk women for nothing.....

    So basically you're saying at Midwife wouldn't be qualified in caring for a women with pre-eclampsia (a high risk condition) because she's not a nurse, even though pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy only disease and I doubt that this would have been covered in a nursing degree??

    Oh god forbid I check a woman with diabetes BSL in labour. How could I possibly know what the result would mean, because I'm not a nurse and don't have any knowledge about diabetes, despite having done an entire subject dedicated to women with diabetes.

    Might as well just give up on checking blood pressures, pulses, urine tests, ordering blood tests as well seeing as they could all show that they have a medical condition that I wouldn't know how to care for. You do know that test and observational results (blood pressure, iron levels etc) are different in pregnant women and different between trimesters compared to non pregnant women, so using your nursing knowledge to check these results is going to result in using incorrect reference ranges?
    No need to be sarcastic, ONOL was being very polite. I think it's interesting to hear the point of view of other people actually in the workforce - there are a lot of students on this thread so it's nice to have some other opinions.

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by tashaplus2 View Post
    Sorry but what's an MGP? Lol sorry we don't have those in nz so have no idea
    Midwifery Group Practice. A group of midwives facilitating continuity of care for low risk women through public hospitals. Pretty much the same as Birth Centre care, but without the physical birth centre

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,909
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked
    381
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    Just out of interest, why is this an issue for new graduate midwives but not an issue for new graduate nurses??? Double standards.....

    Graduate nurses are going to have the exact same 'problems' that you've stated, and graduate dual degree nurses/midwives are also going to have the same 'problems'.
    Graduate nurses have the same problems. I've been there done that, so that's why I can write this list!

    I was asked why is it more beneficial to do postgrad midwifery rather than the BMid, and that's why I think it's more beneficial. Postgrad midwives don't have these problems after graduating from the postgrad degree....they've already sorted all that out.

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,909
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked
    381
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    To work in MGP you have to have experience. There's no question about that.

    But...are you going to be able to tell the difference between a 20 year old new grad and a 45 year old new grad? And are you going to treat them differently because of their age? Most likely yes.
    I do like to ask people questions like 'how long have you been working here' etc.

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    5
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    Graduate nurses have the same problems. I've been there done that, so that's why I can write this list!

    I was asked why is it more beneficial to do postgrad midwifery rather than the BMid, and that's why I think it's more beneficial. Postgrad midwives don't have these problems after graduating from the postgrad degree....they've already sorted all that out.
    But what I'm asking is why is this an issue for midwifery and why not nursing???


 

Similar Threads

  1. Graduate entry nursing or bachelor degree…?
    By gladtobemrsc in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20-06-2012, 20:10
  2. Bachelor of nursing science compared to bachelor of nursing?
    By Jensha in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-04-2012, 17:07
  3. mature aged students - help required for midwifry options
    By pisces00 in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-03-2012, 11:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Shapland Swim Schools
Shapland's at participating schools offer free baby orientation classes once a month - no cost no catches. Your baby will be introduced to our "natural effects" orientation program develop by Shapland's over 3 generations, its gentle and enjoyable.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Life Fertility
Life Fertility Clinic is a boutique fertility clinic located in Spring Hill, Brisbane. Our dedicated fertility and IVF specialists offer professional, holistic, personalised options for the treatment of each patient’s specific needs.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!