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  1. #41
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    I think both have their pros & cons, and it'll be interesting to see how getting rid of the postgraduate programs affects the workforce. Currently I believe midwives are one of the most in-demand areas, and most midwives at the moment are also RN's, so it'll be interesting to see how the bulk of midwives coming through the direct-entry program affects the supply of midwives. I think it will reduce the number of RN's wanting to study midwifery, but for those who know straight off the bat they want to go into midwifery, it'll probably encourage them even more. When I did my BNursing midwifery didn't even exist as a direct entry- it was all postgrad- man I feel old now!

    Like has been said earlier- with the direct entry you do spend 3 years learning about one specific area. Which is certainly good. I guess the cons are that room for movement in the hospital is far less than having dual RN/ midwife registration. With the postgrad most basic training is already taken care of- A&P, basic skills eg meds, IV's, etc, etc, are already learned so they can spend the year just focusing on the specific stuff. I don't think one group comes out more qualified than another.

    As for overseas registration- that's a pain in the neck to get whichever way you go about your degrees- overseas nursing councils (apart from Aust/ NZ who have to recognise each other's degrees) will always find something wrong with something you've done! I'm trying to deal with one particular overseas nursing council at the moment and I wonder if the person I'm emailing even speaks English sometimes...

    I do wonder about job opportunities though. I understand the UK and NZ have a different way of studying that works for them. I'll just mention the UK as I work with a zillion people from there and have got my head around their system. They either study adults nursing, paeds nursing, psych or middy and generally (I can think of a few exceptions who did further study for another area) are only qualified to work in one of those areas. That works fine for the UK- most hospitals over there are in cities and in small towns the nearest urban area is never too far away. However here in Australia there are large amounts of rural areas with small hospitals where they really need staff to be jack of all trades- able to handle adults, kids, pregnant ladies, psych patients and anyone else who walks through the door basically, which is why we do a generalist BNurs degree which covers most of those areas excepts middy. (On a side note, it's interesting that we don't cover a bit of middy in the BNurs degree- we do all the rest.) I wonder how that will affect shortages in rural areas- where you're always hearing about how critical the shortages are etc, etc, etc. I've heard though in some very rural areas they fly you out at 36 weeks to deliver elsewhere, so that might be part of the reason...who knows. I'm just speculating really

    As for me, I've been a RN for a good few years now and I plan on applying for postgrad in 2013, before they phase it out entirely

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    I guess the cons are that room for movement in the hospital is far less than having dual RN/ midwife registration.
    Just wanted to point out that if your doing the BMid it's because you probably because you DON'T want to move within the hospital and want to become an expert in your field not have bits of knowledge in lots of areas.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkey face View Post
    Not always true. A week ago a woman gave went into labour at 25 weeks pregnant. DEM's failed to pick up that the woman had an infection that needed to be addressed and sent her home, where she died of septic shock. Again, something not pregnancy related but should have been picked up by them while she was in their care. The DEM's simply said they were too busy to bother with the mother even though it's been recorded that the lab had rang up to talk to one of the DEM's, for 5 minutes in regards to the infection. The DEM that spoke on the phone failed to see the importance, due to not learning about it and promptly forgot about it.


    .
    Very sad but I doubt it was anything to do with the education. Let's face it (and you have to graduate and start work to realise this) but it's fairly standard that when you've actually graduated and joined the workforce, you realise just how little you knew as a student. Like any profession I guess.

    There's a golden rule in nursing- if you suspect there could be a problem and don't know what to do about it, report it to someone more senior.

    Generally if the lab is concerned enough to call you about results (and not just inform you that you didn't write the time and date clearly enough on your specimens ) it should be reported to the shift coordinator.

    It sounds like a lack of understanding that basic principle more than anything else. You can be a complete expert on everything to do in your area but you're going to get into a lot of trouble if you don't understand- when in doubt - tell someone more important than you!

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    Just wanted to point out that if your doing the BMid it's because you probably because you DON'T want to move within the hospital and want to become an expert in your field not have bits of knowledge in lots of areas.
    Yes, I mentioned that in my post.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    Very sad but I doubt it was anything to do with the education. Let's face it (and you have to graduate and start work to realise this) but it's fairly standard that when you've actually graduated and joined the workforce, you realise just how little you knew as a student. Like any profession I guess.

    There's a golden rule in nursing- if you suspect there could be a problem and don't know what to do about it, report it to someone more senior.

    Generally if the lab is concerned enough to call you about results (and not just inform you that you didn't write the time and date clearly enough on your specimens ) it should be reported to the shift coordinator.

    It sounds like a lack of understanding that basic principle more than anything else. You can be a complete expert on everything to do in your area but you're going to get into a lot of trouble if you don't understand- when in doubt - tell someone more important than you!
    Agree!! Nothing to do with the fact that she didn't have the nursing qualification, just very poor handling of the matter. Its a shame people use situations like these to make midwives feel worthless....

    I also wonder why the doctor wasn't reviewing test results as well, see as 25 weeks PTL would be definitely being treated by a doctor. And I would imagine that if the labs calling you with results then the conversation would go something like 'Look her white cell counts were super high, she has an infection get that looked at'.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    Yes, I mentioned that in my post.
    Sorry you just made it sound like that not being able to move is a bad thing. Personally its one of my favourite things, means they can stop trying to put outlying cardio/resp patients on the maternity ward because I won't be qualified to look after them! What a shame. cough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cupcake91 View Post
    Sorry you just made it sound like that not being able to move is a bad thing. Personally its one of my favourite things, means they can stop trying to put outlying cardio/resp patients on the maternity ward because I won't be qualified to look after them! What a shame. cough.
    No, no! Sorry it came across like that, didn't mean it at all.
    Personally, I like working in different areas but I know a lot of people who fell in love with one area and years later are still there and very happy.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria02 View Post
    No, no! Sorry it came across like that, didn't mean it at all.
    Personally, I like working in different areas but I know a lot of people who fell in love with one area and years later are still there and very happy.
    Definitely! One of my fave things about continuity of care models - one day your running your antenatal clinic, the next your out visiting new mumma's at home with their babies and the day after you've been called in at 2am for a birth! You never know quite what's going to happen that day

  9. #49
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    I agree with all the above. DEM's get bad press above.... But it's bad practice that screws things up not whether u were trained as a nurse or dem or doctor!

  10. #50
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    Sorry for my not spelling MIDWIFERY correctly.....

    I must learn how to spell Midwifery.
    I must learn how to spell Midwifery.

    Actually i must learn how to spell.

    Thanks all for your input. Its definitely swaying me. As one poster said being a nurse and being a midwife are two very different careers.

    Keep the opinions coming.


 

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