+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 109
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    2080
    Posts
    760
    Thanks
    153
    Thanked
    155
    Reviews
    7
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default SPIN OFF***** Direct entry Midwifry vs Nursing then postgrad Midwifry

    This is a question arising from something in the 2012 studying thread, I am a SAHM hoping to go to Uni next January. I have a DD17 mo and DS3mo, I want to study Midwifry. I am undecided whether or not to apply for direct entry midwifry or nursing then postgrad midwifry. I have spoken to some nursing friends and there seems to be some issues with the opinions on direct entry midwifry.

    So tell me if you know, once qualified are direct entry midwives considered less qualified than those who are qualified nurses first? I am Really interested in midwifry, i am 35 and will be 40 when qualified hoping to do 1 year parttime then 2 years fulltime. Direct entry seems better solution for me but i dont want to limit my job prospects. Also i wonder is there an underlying notion in the workplace between midwives that unless you have done nursing first you couldnt have the knowlege to be a great midwife...

    Also has anyone sat a STAT as a means of entry to UTS and whats the score needed to get in?..

    Looking forward to your opinions!

    Im so friggin excited to be doing this!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,701
    Thanks
    212
    Thanked
    373
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I agree I'd like to know from someone in the field preferably. Are direct entry midwives considered second rate? Either job prospect-wise or by working colleagues? I have just been accepted into direct entry and I'm nervous. It is sooooooo much work. What if I put my family through all this and I can't get a job? Or I do get a job and I'm treated like a second class professional? 😖😓

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to ElizaDoLittle For This Useful Post:

    crunchie  (19-01-2012)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    2080
    Posts
    760
    Thanks
    153
    Thanked
    155
    Reviews
    7
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    My concerns exactly! I have a very good nurse friend who doesnt think that direct entry is less qualified... However an older midwife friend thinks that direct entry you are loosing a lot of other knowlege you may need... She studied 30 years ago though and understands that direct eny is more common now.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    437
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked
    32
    Reviews
    0
    With direct entry, we ARE learning all the nursing skills needed for midwifery. I just think that the idea of direct entry is new to some hospitals but it has been in NZ, UK and Canada for years now & works well. I've had direct entry preceptors who are great midwives.

    I'd love to hear whether professional nurses or midwives think direct entry midwives are second rate too.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Brunfelsia Dreaming For This Useful Post:

    crunchie  (19-01-2012)

  7. #5
    MuminMind's Avatar
    MuminMind is offline Bubhub Award Winner - 2011- Most Helpful Member, Member I'd Most Like To Meet, Most Community Minded Thread, Best Potential Moderator and Newbie of the Year Awards
    BH Advocate - PND & AND
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,787
    Thanks
    3,565
    Thanked
    937
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Great thread! I am hereby subscribing.

  8. #6
    Opinionated's Avatar
    Opinionated is offline Winner 2009 - Best Avatar
    You know you love me.
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,509
    Thanks
    140
    Thanked
    808
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I am about to finish my nursing degree, and a family member has just finished their BMid. I am considering doing midwifery post grad. There is nothing wrong with the education given to Bmidders, they have first rate knowledge in their field. The issue seems to be at the other end of the degree. My family member was extremely lucky to secure a position upon graduation. Out of her 8 friends, all of whom were on the deans list with grade point averages of 6.0 or higher, she was the only one to have a permanent job for next year. It seems that womens/maternity hospitals were the only ones keen on straight Bmids. Other hospitals where midwifery is just one department were much more interested in those with double degrees Bnurse/Bmid to staff their midwifery areas and straight Bnurses for other areas of the hospital.

    During my 3rd year placements, I got to do rotations at two regional hospitals near to me, both of which have maternity units. I have friends that have birthed at both of these hospitals and would one day like to work at them. I enquired about how the maternity units were staffed. Neither hospitals hire straight Bmids. This could be because the degree is fairly recent, but also because of the hospitals size. Staff in their maternity units are sometimes required to work in other areas of the hospital and for that reason they only hire RNs with postgraduate midwifery qualifications. One of the hospitals was even happy to pay for their staff to gain midwifery qualifications after they started working for them.

    My advice would be to do postgraduate midwifery or a double degree if midwifery is your passion. At this point in time, employment options for Bmidders is quite limited, and almost non existent in regional and country areas from what I have noticed.
    Last edited by Opinionated; 19-01-2012 at 14:49.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Opinionated For This Useful Post:

    crunchie  (19-01-2012),twotrunks  (21-01-2012)

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,072
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked
    269
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Coming from a different angle here - I'm a kiwi and here in nz they don't do post grad nursing training in midwifery and have two years ago, increased the bmid to a 4 yr degree. Here in nz it seems that straight bmid midwives are seen more highly as they have trained for longer in that one specialized field. I am not 100% able to confirm this - but have been told by hospital staff and a Uni lecturer that in nz they may stop giving registration in the coming years to midwives who didn't do the bmid direct entry. I also was told by an Ozzie midwife that her Uni told her they are phasing the post grad midwifery out all tgtha in the coming years.

    So that's my five cents

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to SunshineMunky For This Useful Post:

    crunchie  (19-01-2012)

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    71
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    11
    Reviews
    0
    That may have been my post? If so, sorry to have worried you.

    The BMID does cover a lot of the knowledge you will need relating to maternity/labour/birth, but as you all know, there is more to this stage of life. General nursing problems do pop up for many women, whether they are pregnant with a prior disease that may unexpectedly cause problems, to those that get severe injuries during their pregnancy or just before their birth, which can impact it. The reason dual or those who did a postgrad or masters in midwifery are more sought after is because they have the nursing background/training to address these problems or even pick up on something during a prenatal that may be wrong with the mother that requires the nursing knowledge as it's not pregnancy related, but could cause problems with it (ie/ blood works that return a reading that are indicative of cancer).

    It may not cause a problem gaining employment, but it may make a difference in how you are treated at work. And that does matter a lot when you are spending more time with co-workers than you are with family. May midwives I personally know see direct entry midwives more on par with EN's and treat them accordingly. But honestly, if you are finding problems with employment, you could always do a postgrad or masters in nusring. 2 years, or 1.5 years if you accelerate it (do summer semester).

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,701
    Thanks
    212
    Thanked
    373
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by monkey face View Post
    That may have been my post? If so, sorry to have worried you.

    The BMID does cover a lot of the knowledge you will need relating to maternity/labour/birth, but as you all know, there is more to this stage of life. General nursing problems do pop up for many women, whether they are pregnant with a prior disease that may unexpectedly cause problems, to those that get severe injuries during their pregnancy or just before their birth, which can impact it. The reason dual or those who did a postgrad or masters in midwifery are more sought after is because they have the nursing background/training to address these problems or even pick up on something during a prenatal that may be wrong with the mother that requires the nursing knowledge as it's not pregnancy related, but could cause problems with it (ie/ blood works that return a reading that are indicative of cancer).

    It may not cause a problem gaining employment, but it may make a difference in how you are treated at work. And that does matter a lot when you are spending more time with co-workers than you are with family. May midwives I personally know see direct entry midwives more on par with EN's and treat them accordingly. But honestly, if you are finding problems with employment, you could always do a postgrad or masters in nusring. 2 years, or 1.5 years if you accelerate it (do summer semester).
    I've done one year part time (under the nursing banner but exactly the same as first year middie, as in they were sitting next to me) and I can already read an ECG, listen to heart and breath sounds and diagnose, give you symptoms of an auto immune disease and recognize them in someone and do a nerve pathways assessment (reflexes and dermatone feeling) and so much more. What is it that they learn and we don't? I swapped to middie because I want to be a midwife in 3 years, not 4.5. Honestly only one subject for the first two years is different to the Bach. Of nursing.

    Sorry I have just read that back over and it sounds like I'm cranky. I'm not just confused and a bit stressed I don't want to have no job in 3 years...

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,701
    Thanks
    212
    Thanked
    373
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Cant edit, darn app the subjects are called different things and the placements are obviously in diff places of the hospital but they are so alike. I hope I haven't made a huge mistake.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Graduate entry nursing or bachelor degree…?
    By gladtobemrsc in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20-06-2012, 20:10
  2. Bachelor of nursing science compared to bachelor of nursing?
    By Jensha in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-04-2012, 17:07
  3. mature aged students - help required for midwifry options
    By pisces00 in forum Hubbers who are studying
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-03-2012, 11:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Ro&Co
Share magical moments this Christmas with this gorgeous gingerbread house. Exclusively available in Brisbane, with FREE delivery in Brisbane Metro areas. Each Christmas Centrepiece is unique and made to order, from $240.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Wendys Music School
Wendy’s Music School. Experience, Quality and great service! For qualifying students we will get you playing or singing your favourite music in 90 days GUARANTEED! Book a free assessment online now!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!